Letters 10-05-2015

Bravo Regarding the Sept. 28 Northern Express letter “Just The Facts” by Julie Racine, opinion column “E Pluribus Unum” by Thomas Kachadurian, and Spectator column “Fear Not” by Stephen Tuttle: Bravo. Bravo. Bravo....

Right On OMG. Julie Racine’s letter “Just the Facts” in the Sept. 28 issue said everything I was thinking. I totally agree. Amen sister...

Kachadurian’s Demeaning Sham Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion piece “E Pluribus Unum” is a very ill-informed perspective of American history. He attempts to portray our past as a homogenized national experience that has transcended any ethnic and regional differences with “the understanding” that our differences shouldn’t really matter...

Opinions Disguised As Facts Freedom of speech is a founding principle upon which our country prides itself, and because of this we all have a right to our opinion. It is when opinions are disguised as facts that we allow for ignorance to spread like wildfire...

Reject Your Own Stereotypes In his “E Pluribus Unum” column of 9/28, Mr. Kachadurian starts calmly enough with a simple definition and history of that famous motto from the Great “from many, one” seal of the U.S., but soon goes off the rhetorical rails. Alas, this heritage-sharing chat with neighbors soon turns into a dirty laundry list polemic, based on an us vs. them worldview...

Thanks For Just The Facts Thank you sooooo much to Julie in Marion for laying out the laundry list of right wing fabrications in her letter last week...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Nancy‘s Fury
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Nancy‘s Fury

Glen Young - June 21st, 2007
Rock and roll has long been implicated as a cause of the generation gap. Fathers, the argument goes, champion the Rolling Stones and the like, while sons bang their heads to hip-hop, Saliva or The Killers.
Scott and Dave Bachelor of Petoskey have instead used the thumping sounds of rock rhythms to forge a stronger father-son relationship. Scott plays drums and Dave sings lead vocals for the Petoskey-area band Nancy’s Fury, more popularly known as Footloose.
Appearing regularly at Petoskey’s Papa Lou’s, Northern Lights Recreation Center, and the Stampede in Gaylord, Nancy’s Fury has won a regular following, thanks in part to Scott’s cohesive drumming and Dave’s rangy singing.
The two are joined on stage by lead guitarist Dave Misale, guitarist Eric Wilson, and bassist Ken Reedy.
Footloose formed in the mid-‘90s, playing largely country-flavored sets. Scott eventually sat in as a back-up drummer, and ultimately took over the job full time. With a few other personnel changes, his son Dave also came to be a regular member of the band.
“It definitely wasn’t planned,” Scott says. “He asked if he could come up and sing a song sometime,” Scott, 43, says of his now 18-year-old son. Crowds responded appreciatively. “So, we started making his guest appearances a regular thing,” Dave’s proud dad continues.
Dave, who says he wants to eventually “become a rock and roll superstar,” recalls his early days vividly. “When I started I was 15,” Dave says. His appearances had to come early in the band’s sets, because “I couldn’t stay in bars that late back then.”

Before performing with Footloose he sang with some bands made up of other Petoskey High School students, from where he recently graduated, but only because he fibbed to some friends in ninth grade and told them he could sing when they needed a front man. “I didn’t know how to sing at all,” he admits with a laugh.
Dave says he and his father, who has been involved in rock and roll since he was a teen himself, “have a friendship as well as a father-son relationship.” He does admit as well however, that “any son knows that when you work with your dad, this ‘I’d do it this way’ response sometimes comes out.”
Scott says that the two sometimes disagree because Dave “expects things to happen faster than we realistically know they will. He’s kind of like a wild horse; you have to tame him sometimes.”
Lead guitarist Misale, who joined the band almost a year ago, after answering an ad in the newspaper, says the band has found a comfortable groove. “We’re all equals here.”
The band, which is slowly changing its name to Nancy’s Fury in order to distance itself from the country roots of Footloose, enjoys an eclectic audience at its regular venues. On a recent night at Papa Lou’s, the crowd included both the Harley set as well as local real estate professionals. Their combination of classic and contemporary rock weaves itself well into the memories of all stripes of music fans. Their newest CD, simply titled “Nancy’s Fury,” features covers of “No Sugar Tonight” by the Guess Who, as well as “Basket Case” by Green Day.

Johnnie Walker, bartender and booking agent at Papa Lou’s, says the band “has a good energy to them” and they “have a good clean sound.” He says that crowds react enthusiastically and that at times “we can’t get people off the dance floor.” He also likes working with the band, which he books about once a month, because “they’re all really professional.”
Scott says Nancy’s Fury is hoping to record a CD of original material sometime before next ski season. When they are onstage, up to four nights a week, adding Boyne Mountain’s Snowflake Lounge to their regular venues. He says they have more than a half dozen tracks to date, and need maybe that many more to fill out the disc. All five members collaborate on songwriting.
For more information about Nancy’s Fury visit their website at www.freewebs.com/footlooseband
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