Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Books · The Low-Carb Lifestyle - New...
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The Low-Carb Lifestyle - New research on nutrition and slimming results have made us hungry for more

Nancy Sundstrom - January 8th, 2004

Just how big is the low-carb craze? In a word - huge - and it doesn‘t look like that‘s going to change anytime soon.
We‘re living in an era when an Internet search produces scores of sites on the subject, the top Hollywood celebrities endorse the shunning of bagels and pastas for goat cheese omelettes and Chef‘s salads, stores catering to the growing contingent of low-carb dieters are popping up everywhere, including two that recently opened in Traverse City, and books on the topic dominate the bestseller list.
As if that weren‘t enough, there‘s even a new low-carb beer on the market in the form of Michelob Ultra.
It seems that it wasn‘t all that long ago that people were learning about the Atkins diet and were skeptical that an eating plan based around the near-limitless consumption of red meat and cheese could actually promote weight loss. When Dr. Robert Atkins first introduced the low-carb concept to the public in the 1970s, it was dismissed as dangerous and radical by the cardiologist‘s peers. It was almost 20 years later that the movement caught on and Americans began to accept the notion that it was carbohydrates, not fats, that were making them fat and that all the sugar-heavy, low-fat foods they were consuming was at the root of more than half of the citizens in this country being overweight.

While low-carb diets vary somewhat, the basis is the same: Carbohydrates lead to increased blood-sugar levels, which spur production of insulin, a hormone needed for energy. When carbs and insulin are reduced, the body is forced to burn fat for energy, leading to increased weight loss.
The newest kid on the low-carb block is the South Beach Diet, one which declares upfront that it is not so much a low-carb diet as it is one that focuses on “good“ and “bad“ carbs. Industry experts believe that between 15 and 30 million Americans are flirting with some form of a low-carb diet. Sales of “The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss“ by Arthur Agatston, M.D., have been at the top of the bestseller lists since it came out this past spring, and it seems that no matter where you turn, someone is talking about or trying the diet, which guarantees a loss of eight to 13 pounds in the first two weeks if followed properly.
Linda Decker is a respiratory therapist at Munson Medical Center who just started the South Beach Diet after hearing enthusiastic testimonies from co-workers about its success. Intrigued, she got a copy of the book, read it thoroughly, and liked what it had to say. Nine days into the effort, she has lost four pounds and is highly motivated to continue.
“I picked this diet because I believe in eating all food groups and eating nutritiously, and this one focuses on good, complex carbohydrates, good fats and good fibers,“ said Decker. “I don‘t think it‘s realistic to say you‘ll never eat any form of carbs again, but it‘s obvious that by cutting things like breads and sweets out of your diet, you‘re going to lose weight. What appealed to me here was how healthy this diet seemed and the potential I thought it had for compliance. Diets are worthless if you can‘t stick to them and eventually convert them into a way of life and everyone who has tried South Beach seems to be having good luck with that.“

Kristen Roush is a low-carb resource consultant and certified personal trainer who started a low-carb support group at Munson in November and saw more than 150 people attend that first session to explore how a low-carb lifestyle could work for them. She is a passionate advocate on the issue, having started a low-carb eating program after years of grappling with disordered eating. Her doctor, Thomas Bannow, a supporter of low-carbs, pointed Roush in that direction, something she believes saved her life.
Roush says that even though more people have become aware of the benefits of a low-carb lifestyle, she has still found it difficult to get the word out and deliver accurate information on the diet. So she decided to become a crusader.
“As a full-time realtor, I was spending more time talking to people about making low-carb a lifestyle than real estate,“ she explained. “The subject would always turn toward diet and exercise and I‘d be clearing up the misconceptions about Atkins or something. When I found myself talking more and more about a low-carb lifestyle, and people were calling to ask for help, I knew I needed to make this support group happen.
“This way of eating had become so ingrained into my daily life, that I couldn‘t imagine not following a low-carb lifestyle. I knew that the need for information exchange was so great that I had to do something about bringing these people together. I wanted to be the missing link in encouragement and information and clearing up misconceptions.“

Those misconceptions might include people thinking of low-carb as no-carb, added Roush. “I promote carb-conscious not carb-phobic because there are carbs in practically everything we eat, and you have to make this a workable plan in order to follow,“ she stated. “Dr. Michael E. Schulte, a board-certified cardiologist with Grand Traverse Heart Associates who spoke at our last meeting, is convinced that there is no need to do further studies to prove the success of a low-carb lifestyle.“
“In fact, feeling better‚ is just that, period,“ says Dr. Schulte. “Don‘t let anyone tell you that feeling better just isn‘t enough. Your body is smarter than any physician, and has the power to heal itself.“
Based on the attendance at the first two low-carb support group meetings, Roush knows she‘s delivering a product for which many in the community seem - well - hungry.
“The response has been amazing so far, and some of that is because people have been so scammed for so long that they don‘t trust any one thing. When dieters do follow a low-carb program, the benefits are felt so quickly that it‘s hard to comprehend the difference. The support group comes into play when they feel that they want to turn the initial phase into the next phase, making it a lifestyle. People attending the group are looking for recipes and cooking, resources from the experts and those who have been successful, and online support groups and a diet buddy. Most people who have been successful want to share and help because they feel so great. The doctors who have come to speak at our group are the icing on the cake.“
For more information on the group, contact Roush at lowcarbing@aol.com or call (231) 645-2373.

Benefits of a low carb lifestyle:

• sustained weight loss
• stabilized blood sugar (especially important for diabetics)
• lowered blood pressure
• more energy and an overall sense of well-being
• exchanging fat for muscle, which will give you a lean, toned look.
• stamina and strength will increase
• moods will level out, making you manage stress (and your loved ones!) much more effectively
• the appearance of cellulite will dramatically improve
• you‘ll stop craving sugar and say bye-bye to your carbohydrate addiction

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