Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · Electric Cars
. . . .

Electric Cars

Katie Huston - August 23rd, 2007
When Garth Ward steps on his accelerator, he can go from 0 to 60 miles per hour in less than 10 seconds. His 20-mile commute used to cost him $18.75 per trip. Now, he’s paying a mere 37 cents.
Ward, a resident of Garfield Township, is the proud owner of an electric vehicle – a Corbin Sparrow. “People don’t realize I move down the road for a penny a mile, and the only thing I have to do is plug it in and fill the windshield fluid,” he says.
The three-wheeled, one-seater Sparrow looks like it drove straight out of a Pixar movie. It doesn’t burn a drop of oil. It can travel 40 miles on one charge, reach speeds of 80 miles per hour, and go from 0 to 60 mph in less than 10 seconds. It fits two bags of groceries. And it’s quiet. “You hear the tires on the ground and the brakes. There’s nothing else to listen to,” Ward says.
His Sparrow can be recharged at any electrical outlet. “Everyone’s porch becomes a gas station,” he says. When he charges his car at home, his energy comes largely from a wind turbine in his backyard.
The car’s a real conversation starter. “The profile of it coming down the street really stops people. When I go for a loaf of bread, I better plan at least an hour,” Ward says.

Made by Corbin Motors in California, 285 Sparrows were manufactured and put on the road between 1999 and 2002. Ward paid $9,000 used, for his car. Today, Corbin Motors has gone under; Myers Motors has adopted the design, but the vehicles, now called NmGs, will set you back $24,900.
If you want to buy an electric car in America, your options are limited. Today, it seems, electric vehicles are either an elitist commodity or little more than a golf cart.
If you only need your car to travel short distances at moderate speeds, you could look at a “Neighborhood Electric Vehicle,” known as an NV. According to the Electric Drive Transportation Association, estimates showed that up to 76,000 low-speed, battery-powered vehicles were in use in the U.S., up from about 56,000 in 2004. While they may be great for in-town drives, their 40-mile range and top speed of 35 (regulated to only 25 in most states, including Michigan) limits their feasibility.
There are electric cars that go faster and farther, but they’re a lot more expensive. Besides the NmG, two options are currently on the market in America. A Tesla, which has a top speed of over 130 miles per hour, and a range of 200 miles, costs $100,000. The ultra-narrow Commutercar Tango, which can reach 150 miles per hour and go 160 miles before a recharge, will set you back $105,000.
“What practicality is that for me, the common homeowner?” asks Ward. “They’re overbuilding it for the one guy who can afford it.” Today, the electric cars on the market are sleek and glittering vehicles that focus on acceleration and speed, not the needs--and pocketbooks--of average Americans, he says.

Electric cars are nothing new in America. They may look and sound futuristic, but 100 years ago, there were more electric cars than gas-powered cars on the road. With the advent of automatic starters, cheaper oil, and mass production, the internal combustion engine eclipsed the electric car in the 1920s.
In 1990, California passed the Zero Emissions Act, which required two percent of vehicles sold in 1998 and 10 percent of vehicles sold in 2003 to be “zero emission vehicles.” Automakers began to produce electric cars aimed at the average consumer. General Motors’ EV1, released in 1997 and 1999, could travel 75-150 miles on one charge and reach speeds of up to 80
miles per hour.
Other vehicles were introduced: the Ford Th!nk, Honda EV Plus, Toyota RAV4 EV, Ford Ranger EV, and Nissan Altra EV.
In 2002, however, carmakers sued the state of California, which repealed the Zero Emissions Act. They removed all these cars from the market, and concentrated their resources instead on developing hybrids and fuel cell technology.
Auto companies say there was not enough demand for the vehicles, and that they were too expensive to produce. People wanted a car that could travel an unlimited distance, they claimed.
Safety is also a concern. The Tesla has airbags, as did all of the cars introduced in the late ’90s, but discontinued when the Zero Emissions Act was repealed. However, many electric vehicles, including Ward’s Sparrow, do not (technically, it’s not a car.). And automakers have yet to create an electric vehicle that can be used year-round in cold climates. During the winter months, Ward’s Sparrow waits for the snow to melt.

Critics of electric vehicles also argue that 55% of America’s electricity comes from dirty, coal-fired power plants, which means electric vehicles are not truly “zero-emission” vehicles.
However, many people -- Ward included -- believe that automakers are wary to invest in electric cars because the alternative technology could dramatically reduce their profits -- not to mention the profits of every other facet of the auto industry, including parts manufacturers, mechanics, and the oil industry.
“What about the guy who fixes the transmission? What about the guy who pumps the gas?” Ward asks. “If everyone that could, drove one of these, it would drive Michigan into an economic slump it could probably never recover from.”
Although he lives in the auto state, Ward had trouble finding an electric car that would meet his needs; his only options were NVs or do-it-yourself kits. When he heard about a Sparrow for sale in Washington state, he drove all the way across the country to
pick it up.

Americans want electric vehicles, but they want more practical options, says Ward. “There’s no support out there for it because people look at this car and say, ‘Gee, I don’t want to go 40 miles; I want to go 200 miles,’” he says. “They’re gonna want it to haul their families to Sacramento and back in a weekend at 100 miles per hour.”
The auto industry shouldn’t feel threatened, he says, because electric cars will never replace all our transportation needs. “Just because we invented the car doesn’t mean we shot every horse,” he says. “Just because we invented the electric car does not mean all the gas guzzlers will go away.” Petroleum-powered cars will still be needed to transport heavy loads.
But, he says, “People have sports cars they just use on weekends. People have different ties for different days. I don’t see why people don’t have different cars for different purposes.”
If we put our resources into developing electric vehicles, he says, we could offer practical and affordable alternatives to conventional cars, but petroleum-based technology pushes electric cars to the back burner. “The reality of moving cars down the road without gas is right in front of
our faces.”

For more information about the rise and fall of the EV1, check out the documentary “Who Killed the Electric Car?”
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5