Letters

Letters 11-24-2014

Dangerous Votes You voted for Dr. Dan. Thanks!Rep. Benishek failed to cosponsor H.R. 601. It stops subsidies for big oil companies. He failed to cosponsor H.R. 1084. There is an exemption for hydraulic fracturing written into the Safe Drinking Water Act. H.R. 1084. It would require the contents of fracking fluids to be publicly disclosed to protect the public health.

Solar Is The Answer There have been many excellent letters about the need for our region, state and nation to take action on climate change. Now there is a viable solution to this ever-growing problem: Solar energy is the future.

Real Minimum Wage In 1966, a first class stamp cost 5 cents and minimum wage was $1.25. Today, a first class stamp is 49 cents, so federal minimum wage should be $11.25.

Doesn’t Seem Warmer I enjoy the “environmentalists” twisting themselves into pretzels trying to convince us that it is getting warmer. Sure it is... 

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · Reggie‘s Boxed...
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Reggie‘s Boxed Set/Opying out/New players

- February 25th, 2008
REGGIE‘S BOX SET
When Reggie Box died in 1995 from non-Hodgkins lymphoma, the popular general manager of WKLT-FM left behind 28 boxes of rock memorabilia.
Those hundreds of items will be auctioned online in early April through backstageauctions.com, based in Houston.
“Reggie was a great collector and when he passed away, all of his rock and roll memorabilia was boxed up and stored in my basement,“ says Katherine Ryder Purcell, who was married to Box for more than 10 years. Their marriage encompassed the same years that Box worked at KLT, from 1985-‘95, first in radio sales and then as station manager. Many give credit to Box for his leadership in taking the station from a small signal in Kalkaska to a radio powerhouse that is heard across Northern Michigan.
Box, who was also a Civil War buff, had an opportunity to meet many rock stars at the station, and was the recipient of numerous promo items. He had also been witness to the explosive rock scene of the late ‘60s-early ‘70s, with an appreciation for pop history.
“He had everything from a guitar signed by Stevie Ray Vaughn to some thong underwear from AC/DC,“ Purcell says. “And there are also rare tickets, backstage passes, posters and copies of Rolling Stone magazine back when it was a paper tabloid.“
Other items to be auctioned include guitars signed by John Cougar Mellencamp and Buddy Guy; every Kinks album the band put out, including imports and rarities; mementoes of Woodstock I & II; 16-20 boxes of promo CDs; and between 50-60 framed items.
“Reggie was a picture framer before he joined WKLT, so he had all of these beautifully framed pieces of rock and roll history in his collection,“ Purcell says. One such item is a copy of “Teen Beat“ magazine, featuring proud poppa Ringo Starr with his baby son, Zack. When the two performed at the Grand Traverse Resort in the early ‘90s, Box got them both to sign the cover.
Purcell heard about the auction while visiting Cleveland‘s Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. A similar collection was up for sale through the online auction company which specializes in rock memorabilia. The Reggie Box collection will be previewed online the first week in April and then open for bids from April 6-13. See www.backstageauctions.com.

OPTING OUT
A Central Lake woman didn’t know there was a way to stop military recruiters from getting the home phone number of her high school son, but she wishes she had. Now, he is deployed in Iraq and is committed to a five-year stint.
The woman (who wishes to remain anonymous) said her son’s “direct ticket to the war zone” came from a military recruiter. She recently spoke to the Central Lake High school board and is urging parents to ask about an opt-out form. It’s the only way to stop personal contact information from reaching recruiters. It must be submitted each year (junior and senior year). She also wants schools to tell parents about the form.
For a generic form, Google “military opt-out” and submit to the school principal.
“It may not have made a bit of difference,” she said. “But what if it had? I don’t want other parents to have that regret. I’ll tell you one thing — the picture the recruiters present is broken and unclear. There are a lot of loopholes and hidden messages and broken promises, most of which you’ll never catch onto until you’ve been there, done that.”

THE NEW PLAYERS
Increasingly, the biggest players on the music scene in Northern Michigan are its casinos, with national acts flooding into the region to fill plush venues with 1,500 seats or more. Tickets tend to run in the $25-$40 range.
With new pop, rock, country and comedy acts arriving weekly, the face of entertainment in Northern Michigan is brighter than ever before; in the past, a desire to see many of the acts meant a long drive to Detroit or Chicago.
Here‘s a partial rundown on some of the upcoming acts at casinos:

• Odawa Casino Resort, Petoskey:
-- Miranda Lambert
-- Robert Cray Band
-- Creedence Clearwater Revisited
-- Chubby Checker
-- Pat Benatar

• Kewadin Dream Makers,
Sault Ste. Marie:
-- Brett Michaels & Firehouse
-- Collective Soul
-- Styx
-- Loretta Lynn

• Soaring Eagle, Mt. Pleasant:
-- Taganai
-- Ace Frehley & The Tubes
-- Grand Funk Railroad &
The Romantics
-- Gladys Knight

• Little River Casino, Manistee:
-- Foreigner
-- Gordon Lightfoot
-- Smokey Robinson

Additionally, construction is nearing completion on the new $80 million Turtle Creek Casino outside Traverse City, which will also host a music venue. Marty Stuart has been booked for June with The Georgia Satellites booked for July at the new facility.

 
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