Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Proposed theme park a bad trip

Robert Downes - April 14th, 2008
Proposed theme park a bad trip
Remember Auto World?
Auto World was the theme park that opened in Flint in July, 1984. It was supposed to tell the glorious story of the automobile with exhibits like a giant car engine. It had all the goodies: animatronic robots, an amusement park... even a mannequin representing Jacob Smith, the founder of Flint. You walked into Smith’s humble cabin, pressed a button, and a film was projected onto the mannequin’s face, welcoming you to Auto World.
But this was one jalopy that soon ran out of gas. It proved to be about as popular as “Refrigerator World” or “Naugahyde Seat World.” Auto World went bankrupt within a year for lack of customers... possibly, they headed just up the way to “Chicken Dinner World” in Frankenmuth instead.
Now, Michigan’s Department of Natural Resources is being asked to sell 1,800 acres of state land for a theme park in Grayling that promises to bring thousands of jobs to the area, along with more tourists. But to paraphrase a line from the film Sixth Sense: “I see Auto World.”
Grayling’s chamber of commerce is lobbying the State to sell the land for a proposed $161 million theme park which would be built just off I-75. More than 2,000 residents of Crawford County have signed petitions supporting the project. The new park would bring many more people in search of jobs to Crawford County, not to mention a flood of chain stores, restaurants and motels.
But, as noted in published reports, there’s doubt as to whether developer Patrick Crosson of Axiom Entertainment in Rochester Hills can pull off the project. He was involved in a theme park in Indiana in the 1990s that went bust, and he emerged from personal bankruptcy in 2006.
Still, Walt Disney owned a number of companies that went broke before he hit the right formula. After his first company collapsed, Disney reportedly survived by eating dog food. His theme parks turned out okay, so perhaps it‘s unfair to count a bankruptcy or two against an entrepreneur willing to stick his neck out.
But theme parks in general are on a downswing across the country: the $30 million Wild West World in Kansas closed within two months of opening last year. Cypress Gardens, the oldest theme park in Florida, went bust in 2004 after a major upgrade (and three hurricanes). And in 2006, Six Flags decided to sell three of its 30 theme parks because the chain is $2.1 billion in debt and has suffered a 13% drop in attendance. Overseas, Euro Disney is on the skids.
Even Cedar Point, “the world’s largest amusement park,” in Ohio, which is within half a day’s drive of some 50 million people, cut its admission prices in 2006 because attendance has dropped at the park.
Speaking of which, why would anyone want to drive 200 miles or more to a theme park in Grayling when Cedar Point is a short hop from Detroit and boasts 68 rides, some of which are acknowledged as being among the best in the world?
But the real question is what do we residents of Northern Michigan want our home to become? The scales can tip toward more urban sprawl and chain stores, or toward scenic beauty and a pleasant place to live and raise a family: you can’t have both.
The developers claim their park will bring more tourists to Northern Michigan, but it‘s also possible that the reverse is true over the long run.
When I first visited Grayling from Detroit in the late ‘70s, it was the forests, clean air and wild atmosphere of the place that made my heart soar. It was the “way up north” sensation that made me want to visit Northern Michigan.
True, some hearts might soar at the sight of the “world’s tallest Ferris wheel and Christmas tree,” a race track, roller coasters and a water park which are proposed for Grayling. But people with that sort of mindset might be more inclined to visit Cedar Point, what with gas prices heading to $4 per gallon this summer.
But for the folks who come up north to “get away from it all“ for hunting, fishing, hiking, sailing, snowmobiling, skiing, cycling (and shopping, by the way), the sight of the “world’s tallest Ferris wheel and Christmas tree” at our gate would likely be a depressing reminder that Northern Michigan is in danger of becoming as butt-ugly as the rest of America as a result of urban sprawl.
In the long run, this dubious park would be one more nail in the coffin of killing off Northern Michigan’s wild, outdoor appeal and everything that makes your heart soar when you hear the words “up north.“
And who will pick up the pieces if this thing takes a dive like Auto World?
 
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