Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · A Meijer Moment
. . . .

A Meijer Moment

Robert Downes - May 5th, 2008
While reaching for a bag of corn chips in the snack aisle recently, an unexpected thought flew into my head: Why the heck am I shopping at Meijer?
Although I’m a member of our local co-op and also support independent supermarkets in the area, there are times when the need for some hardware or whatever leads me down the miles of aisles at the big M.
But lately, you can’t help but wonder if Meijer is the sort of “good neighbor” that’s worth supporting.
It’s troubling to see, for instance, that Meijer has replaced many of its cashiers with digital scan terminals. If a large corporation isn’t bringing jobs to our community, why should we support it? I can’t imagine that many of the cashiers replaced by digital robots were exactly on Easy Street to begin with.
More disturbing is the ongoing scandal in Acme Township. Last December, it was revealed that Meijer’s used corporate money to fund a recall drive against officials in the township who had a zoning issue over the construction of its new superstore. The funds included $30,000 spent on a public relations firm to sway public opinion.
Township officials weren’t bent on scuttling the proposed store; they simply wanted it to fit Acme’s master plan with some requirements that the Meijer bigwigs found inconvenient. The township’s intention was to develop Acme in a way that would still bear a slight resemblance to a nice place to live, rather than the depressing, run-amok, urban sprawl scenario that corporate America seems to prefer.
Using corporate funds in a recall campaign is a felony. In an article in last week’s Detroit Free Press, Rich Robinson, the executive director of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network, spelled out what that means:
“Meijer spent years and tens of thousands of dollars bullying local officials, suing them and generally making their lives hell because they dared to exercise local control in a zoning decision. In this case, justice demands more than a wrist-slap and a token fine.”
Now, there is also an issue over whether Meijer has to respond to the subpoenas of Grand Traverse Prosecutor Alan Schneider, who is seeking communications documents from the corporation regarding the recall. In an April 11 ruling, Circuit Court Judge Philip Rodgers noted that our Legislature has created a special “political class” under the law which could provide Meijer with a way out. Under the Campaign Finance Act, only Michigan’s Department of State can pursue this criminal investigation.
Judge Rodgers‘ opinion stated: “While all other citizens are subject to the full brunt of the justice system for their alleged crimes, the Legislature has created a ‘political class’ of those who are elected or would be elected to office and exempted their alleged campaign crimes from scrutiny by experienced county prosecutors.”
And, quoting again from Rich Robinson’s excellent article: “In this case, the member of the ‘political class’ getting the exemption was the secret source of money behind an election campaign.”
So, that leaves the investigation hanging, and Robinson claims that Meijer hopes to get off with a fine through Michigan’s Department of State, which has no subpoena power, and therefore, no real ability to investigate a possible felony.
Ultimately, this is all just splitting hairs. If Meijer had funded the recall through a political action committee instead of corporate funds, it would still be the mark of a bad neighbor, and the result would be just the same.
True, there are many residents of Acme Township who are angry at their local officials over this case: Funds have been squandered on the Meijer battle at a time when Acme’s roads and sewers need serious attention. And many were giving Meijer the thumbs-up from the get-go.
But, if ever there was a time to support your local, independent supermarket or food co-op, this sure seems to be the proper occasion until Meijer proves that it can be a good neighbor and corporate citizen. Since I stopped shopping at Meijer, I’ve been delighted to find that local stores such as Glen’s, Oleson’s, and certainly the Oryana Food Co-op, have made significant improvements that are well worth your consideration. See you there.
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5