Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

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The gas crunch, Rep. D. Camp, Rep/ B. Stupek

Sen. C. Levin - May 19th, 2008
The Gas Crunch
Elected officials offer their views on $4-per-gallon dilemma

The following views are drawn from a mix of essays and press releases from our elected representatives:

Congress needs
to take action

Rep. Dave Camp, R-Midland

In the last two weeks Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has had us voting on World Glaucoma Day, recognizing 2008 as the International Year of the Reef, and putting the House on record as supporting a National Watermelon Month. Now, we didn’t actually create a National Watermelon Month; we just said there should be one.
There is serious work to do, but it is not being done by this Congress. No wonder Americans are frustrated with Congress. So am I.
Of course, when she was in the minority, Pelosi promised big things...she promised a plan to immediately lower gas prices. Well, that plan has remained a secret these past 16 months and gas prices have shot up $1.20 since she and the Democrats took over Congress. That’s right...the nationwide price for gas has gone up $1.20 since January 1, 2007. Call it the Pelosi Premium.
We need to eliminate the Pelosi Premium, which has added an extra $25 every time you fill up your car. A decade ago, I began pushing alternative energy in the auto industry because transportation makes up 75 percent of our oil consumption. We are now just beginning to see the impact of alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles. But that is only part of the solution.
I believe there are a number of fairly simple, straightforward approaches we can take, if we had the political courage to do so, to lower gas prices in America.
1. Use domestic oil before buying oil from the Middle East.
We have 50 years worth of energy in Alaska and the deep waters of the Outer Continental Shelf. We can tap these in environmentally friendly ways and we should do it today!
2. Increase the number of refineries in the United States.
In 1981, 324 refineries were operating in the United States. In 2005, that number stands at 148 – less than half! Unless we increase domestic production, prices will not drop. And we can do that by cutting the red tape, streamlining the permitting process and utilizing federal property – like old military bases – to build new facilities.
3. Get the Alma Energy Park up and running.
The oil wells in Alma at the old Total refinery can help stabilize prices right here in the region. Experts suggest that by using new technology that blasts CO2 into the old wells (sort of like shaking up a pop bottle) we could get as much as half the oil that is still down there.
4. Continue to promote alternative fuels, vehicles, and infrastructure.
Ethanol is a bridge to the future, but it is not the sole solution. I have authored a new law that provides consumers with a tax credit for the purchase of a new hybrid, lean burn diesel, or other clean fuel car or truck. My plan also provides incentives for gasoline retailers who convert their traditional fuel pumps and tanks to those using clean fuels.
If we can get some of this done, we will start to change the direction we are heading in.

Stop filling Strategic
Petroleum Reserve

Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Menominee

The U.S. House of Representatives has voted on to suspend filling the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) through the end of the year if the price of crude oil remains above $75 a barrel. The action would inject an additional 70,000 barrels of oil per day into the U.S. market to help stabilize the U.S. oil supply and provide some relief at the pump for consumers.
Oil economists estimate suspending the flow of oil into the SPR could lower gas prices by 5 to 24 cents per gallon.
I have long advocated for this action and am a cosponsor of H.R. 6022, which passed the House by a veto-proof majority of 385-25.
Filling the Strategic Petroleum Reserve didn’t make sense when gas prices were approaching $2 a gallon in 2005 and it certainly doesn’t make sense today with prices hovering around $4.
The president has the authority to suspend SPR deliveries without congressional action but – despite repeated bipartisan calls to do so – has refused to take action to address the current energy crisis.
Bush has threatened to veto the House bill if it reaches his desk and the White House has stated that the administration plans to expand the size of the SPR.
With the reserve 97 percent full and oil at an all-time high, now is not the time to continue filling the SPR.
At current prices, the Department of Energy spends more than $8.5 million a day to stockpile oil which, in turn, drives up demand. It’s the families in Northern Michigan and across the country struggling to fill their gas tanks who ultimately pay the price for these policies.
The SPR is an emergency stockpile of petroleum maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy. Congress created the SPR in 1975 in order to protect from future supply disruptions after oil supplies were cut off during the 1973-74 oil embargo. The SPR is the largest emergency stockpile of oil in the world, with the capacity to hold up to 727 million barrels of crude oil. The SPR currently contains more oil than it ever has. With 703 million barrels of oil, it is at 97 percent of its total capacity and contains enough oil to meet U.S. demand for 58 days if oil imports were cut off completely.

Police oil companies
& tax windfall profits

Senator Carl Levin, D-Michigan

Because the Bush Administration has proved itself unable and unwilling to make the necessary changes in its economic, foreign, and energy policies to provide affordable energy supplies to the American people, it is up to the Congress to try to jumpstart a comprehensive solution to skyrocketing energy prices.
The Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, which I chair, has conducted four separate investigations into how our energy markets can be made to work better. As a result of these investigations and hearings, I have advocated the following four measures:
• Put a cop back on the beat in the energy markets to ensure these markets are free from excessive speculation and manipulation;
• Stop filling the Strategic Petroleum Reserve until prices are lower;
• Develop alternatives to fossil fuels to lessen our dependence on oil; and
• Impose a windfall profits tax on oil companies that have profited from the unjustified price increases.

Suspend state gas tax

State Rep. Kevin Elsenheimer

Rep. Kevin Elsenheimer will be at the Marathon Gas Station in Mackinaw City on Monday, May 19 at 2 p.m. to unveil an initiative to temporarily eliminate the 6-percent state sales tax on gasoline through Labor Day, to help drivers during the summer months.
“These costs add up quick on family budgets that are already being stretched to the limits for many Northern Michigan households,” Elsenheimer said. “We’re encouraging people to adapt their driving habits where they can, and suspending the state’s gas sales tax can help while people make adjustments to our current situation. Every bit helps.”
The price for a gallon of gas is now over $4 a gallon in many areas up north. The cost for a gallon of gas at $4 includes 61.5 cents in taxes per gallon - 18.5 cents Federal Gas Tax, 19 cents State Gas Tax and 24 cents sales tax.
Elsenheimer sent a letter to the House Transportation Committee almost a year ago asking for immediate action to be taken on similar legislation to that would lower gas prices overnight. “We can talk about long term strategies to solve our energy crisis until we’re blue in the face,” said Elsenheimer. “Everyone supports alternative technologies, but unfortunately these technologies won’t help us today, what we need now is immediate relief at the pump and there is only one simple way to get that, reduce taxes. Why should the state profiteer off high gas prices?”

 
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