Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · What to do when the oil...
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What to do when the oil runs out/Madonna alert/Algae action/Wind energy for Charlevoix

- May 26th, 2008
What to do when
the oil runs out?
As many as 1,000 participants are expected to attend “The Sustainability Conference on Peak Oil and Climate Change” this weekend in Grand Rapids.
The coming crisis in the oil supply is one of three key topics to be covered at a conference bringing together national experts on “peak oil,” climate change and an environmentally-friendly and sustainable economy.
The conference is scheduled for Friday, May 30, through Sunday, June 1, at the Calvin College Fine Arts Center.
Many experts believe that the worldwide production of oil has “peaked” and that the coming decades will bring a decline in the amount of available oil, leading to a global economic crisis unless steps are taken to promote conservation and sustainable local economies.
The conference is being organized by Local Future, founded by Aaron Wissner, a Grand Rapids-area educator and environmental speaker.
“Dwindling oil supplies are causing a ripple effect across the economy, threatening the American way of life, as sharply rising gas prices impact the price of food, shelter and heating. And fierce competition for oil threatens peace around the globe,” Wissner said. “It is imperative that we begin to understand the impact of peak oil so that we can move quickly toward finding solutions.”
For info see: www.SustainabilityConference.org

Madonna alert
Superstar Madonna is wearing a new hat these days: that of director of a new film on the east African country of Malawi. She plans to attend the Traverse City Film Festival on August 2 for a showing of the film, “I Am Because
We Are.”
“Madonna’s film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York, but this will be its Michigan debut,” said Deb Lake of the TC Film Festival. “She’s currently rehearsing for her new tour, but plans to be here for the screening.”
Madonna adopted a child from Malawi, one of the poorest countries in Africa and a place stricken with one of the continent’s highest AIDS rates.

Algae action
Congressman Bart Stupak (D-Menominee) has introduced legislation aimed at reducing the harmful effect algal blooms have on the Great Lakes.
H.R. 6017 would require the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop a plan to reduce algal blooms in the Great Lakes and require the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to ban household cleaning products that contain greater than 0.5 percent phosphorus by volume.
“Similar efforts have worked at the local and state level, but a piecemeal approach isn’t enough,” Stupak said in a news release. “We need a comprehensive plan to address the harmful effects of the excessive nutrients choking off our Great Lakes ecosystem.”
Nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, in appropriate amounts, are essential to the health of aquatic systems. Excessive nutrients, however, can result in harmful or nuisance algal blooms, reduced spawning grounds and habitat, fish kills and public health concerns related to impaired drinking water sources and increased exposure to toxic microbes. A 2005 study by the state of Minnesota found that approximately 19 percent of phosphorus entering municipal
wastewater systems comes from dishwashing detergent.
Widespread outbreaks of harmful algal blooms have occurred throughout the Great Lakes, but most notably at Bear Lake, Muskegon Lake, Saginaw Bay and Western Lake Erie in Michigan.

Wind energy for Charlevoix
A 400-acre rock quarry south of Charlevoix is being considered for the installation of wind turbines.
Traverse City Light & Power has signed a real estate option and wind easement contract which may lead to the construction of wind turbines in Charlevoix County’s Norwood Township, pending final zoning and permitting.
Construction would not take place for approximately three years, according to a TCL&P news release. The first step in the process will be erecting a meteorological tower to measure if wind speeds are sufficient to justify the construction of one or more wind turbines.
Simultaneously, L&P plans call for a series of public meetings to receive input from area citizens about wind power. L&P erected two similar towers in the past in the Traverse City area.
The 400-acre site is zoned industrial and is owned by Manthei Development.




 
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