Letters

Letters 09-07-2015

DEJA VUE Traverse City faces the same question as faced by Ann Arbor Township several years ago. A builder wanted to construct a 250-student Montessori school on 7.78 acres. The land was zoned for suburban residential use. The proposed school building was permissible as a “conditional use.”

The Court Overreached Believe it or not, everyone who disagrees with the court’s ruling on gay marriage isn’t a hateful bigot. Some of us believe the Supreme Court simply usurped the rule of law by legislating from the bench...

Some Diversity, Huh? Either I’ve been misled or misinformed about the greater Traverse City area. I thought that everyone there was so ‘all inclusive’ and open to other peoples’ opinions and, though one may disagree with said person, that person was entitled to their opinion(s)...

Defending Good People I was deeply saddened to read Colleen Smith’s letter [in Aug. 24 issue] regarding her boycott of the State Theater. I know both Derek and Brandon personally and cannot begin to understand how someone could express such contempt for them...

Not Fascinating I really don’t understand how you can name Jada Johnson a fascinating person by being a hunter. There are thousands of hunters all over the world, shooting by gun and also by arrow; why is she so special? All the other people listed were amazing...

Back to Mayberry A phrase that is often used to describe the amiable qualities that make Traverse City a great place to live is “small-town charm,” conjuring images of life in 1940s small-town America. Where everyone in Mayberry greets each other by name, job descriptions are simple enough for Sarah Palin to understand, and milk is delivered to your door...

Don’t Be Threatened The August 31 issue had 10 letters(!) blasting a recent writer for her stance on gay marriage and the State Theatre. That is overkill. Ms. Smith has a right to her opinion, a right to comment in an open forum such as Northern Express...

Treat The Sickness Thank you to Grant Parsons for the editorial exposing the uglier residual of the criminalizing of drug use. Clean now, I struggled with addiction for a good portion of my adult life. I’ve never sold drugs or committed a violent crime, but I’ve been arrested, jailed, and eventually imprisoned. This did nothing but perpetuate shame, alienation, loss and continued use...

About A Girl -- Not Consider your audience, Thomas Kachadurian (“About A Girl” column). Preachy opinion pieces don’t change people’s minds. Example: “My view on abortion changed…It might be time for the rest of the country to catch up.” Opinion pieces work best when engaging the reader, not directing the reader...

Disappointed I am disappointed with the tone of many of the August 31 responses to Colleen Smith’s Letter to the Editor from the previous week. I do not hold Ms. Smith’s opinion; however, if we live in a diverse community, by definition, people will hold different views, value different things, look and act different from one another...

Free Will To Love I want to start off by saying I love Northern Express. It is well written, unbiased and always a pleasure to read. I am sorry I missed last month’s article referred to in the Aug. 24 letter titled, “No More State Theater.”

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · What to do when the oil...
. . . .

What to do when the oil runs out/Madonna alert/Algae action/Wind energy for Charlevoix

- May 26th, 2008
What to do when
the oil runs out?
As many as 1,000 participants are expected to attend “The Sustainability Conference on Peak Oil and Climate Change” this weekend in Grand Rapids.
The coming crisis in the oil supply is one of three key topics to be covered at a conference bringing together national experts on “peak oil,” climate change and an environmentally-friendly and sustainable economy.
The conference is scheduled for Friday, May 30, through Sunday, June 1, at the Calvin College Fine Arts Center.
Many experts believe that the worldwide production of oil has “peaked” and that the coming decades will bring a decline in the amount of available oil, leading to a global economic crisis unless steps are taken to promote conservation and sustainable local economies.
The conference is being organized by Local Future, founded by Aaron Wissner, a Grand Rapids-area educator and environmental speaker.
“Dwindling oil supplies are causing a ripple effect across the economy, threatening the American way of life, as sharply rising gas prices impact the price of food, shelter and heating. And fierce competition for oil threatens peace around the globe,” Wissner said. “It is imperative that we begin to understand the impact of peak oil so that we can move quickly toward finding solutions.”
For info see: www.SustainabilityConference.org

Madonna alert
Superstar Madonna is wearing a new hat these days: that of director of a new film on the east African country of Malawi. She plans to attend the Traverse City Film Festival on August 2 for a showing of the film, “I Am Because
We Are.”
“Madonna’s film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York, but this will be its Michigan debut,” said Deb Lake of the TC Film Festival. “She’s currently rehearsing for her new tour, but plans to be here for the screening.”
Madonna adopted a child from Malawi, one of the poorest countries in Africa and a place stricken with one of the continent’s highest AIDS rates.

Algae action
Congressman Bart Stupak (D-Menominee) has introduced legislation aimed at reducing the harmful effect algal blooms have on the Great Lakes.
H.R. 6017 would require the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop a plan to reduce algal blooms in the Great Lakes and require the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to ban household cleaning products that contain greater than 0.5 percent phosphorus by volume.
“Similar efforts have worked at the local and state level, but a piecemeal approach isn’t enough,” Stupak said in a news release. “We need a comprehensive plan to address the harmful effects of the excessive nutrients choking off our Great Lakes ecosystem.”
Nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, in appropriate amounts, are essential to the health of aquatic systems. Excessive nutrients, however, can result in harmful or nuisance algal blooms, reduced spawning grounds and habitat, fish kills and public health concerns related to impaired drinking water sources and increased exposure to toxic microbes. A 2005 study by the state of Minnesota found that approximately 19 percent of phosphorus entering municipal
wastewater systems comes from dishwashing detergent.
Widespread outbreaks of harmful algal blooms have occurred throughout the Great Lakes, but most notably at Bear Lake, Muskegon Lake, Saginaw Bay and Western Lake Erie in Michigan.

Wind energy for Charlevoix
A 400-acre rock quarry south of Charlevoix is being considered for the installation of wind turbines.
Traverse City Light & Power has signed a real estate option and wind easement contract which may lead to the construction of wind turbines in Charlevoix County’s Norwood Township, pending final zoning and permitting.
Construction would not take place for approximately three years, according to a TCL&P news release. The first step in the process will be erecting a meteorological tower to measure if wind speeds are sufficient to justify the construction of one or more wind turbines.
Simultaneously, L&P plans call for a series of public meetings to receive input from area citizens about wind power. L&P erected two similar towers in the past in the Traverse City area.
The 400-acre site is zoned industrial and is owned by Manthei Development.




 
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