Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Turtle Creek unveils new $80...
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Turtle Creek unveils new $80 million casino & resort hotel

Al Parker - June 9th, 2008
Complete with a 30-foot water wall, an expansive three-story interior and high-tech lighting to set the mood, Michigan’s newest hotel-casino complex will debut this month.
The new Turtle Creek Hotel and Casino, owned and operated by the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, offers visitors an impressive variety of slot machines, video poker, and table games on its 52,000-square-foot gaming floor.
“It’s going to be a stunning property,” said marketing director Shawn Carlson, a gaming veteran who has been involved in six previous casino openings, including THE Hotel at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas. “We’ve put a lot of thought into every aspect of this building.”
Walking toward the casino’s front entrance, visitors stroll past some two dozen freshly-planted “Champion Trees,” from the Champion Tree Project based in Copemish. Impressive lighting, reflecting pools, lush greenery and running water set the exterior mood.

WALL OF WATER
Once inside, guests are greeted by an impressive three-story wall of running water flanked by escalators on each side. High above the gaming floor, colored lighting bathes the surroundings in blue, then green, then red or purple.
The gaming floor’s ultra-high white ceiling gives it an airy, open feel that is seldom found in any casino, let alone any in Michigan. With fresh lines and an inviting vibe, it exudes contemporary elegance.
The complex’s impressive design is the work of Walsh Bishop, a noted architectural firm that has developed casino and hotel projects across the nation for clients such as Hilton, Marriott, Time-Warner/Comcast and several tribes.
Workers were still putting finishing touches on the casino floor, eateries and hotel rooms when Carlson and Barbi Ance, assistant to the hotel director, recently led a tour through the complex, which stands just south of the current Turtle Creek Casino on M-72 in Williamsburg. Donning hard hats, visitors strolled through the new gambling palace where workers are busy getting the place ready for a soft opening on June 17.

GRAND OPENING
A grand opening is set for June 24, while hotel reservations are being accepted for June 25 and beyond. There are 137 rooms in the hotel, plus five suites that will allow guests to relax in elegant comfort.
From upscale toiletries, to the latest high-tech phone system, to a tasteful leather desk pad, the room amenities are impressive, yet practical. Standard room rates are in the $130-$150 a night range, with discounts available for gaming club members.
“We worked hard to get Michigan workers involved in this project,” said Carlson. “About 85 percent of the materials are from Michigan. We really tried hard to buy locally whenever possible.”
Many of the workers on the project are tribal members, according to Ance.
Color tiles and muted colors lend a contemporary, yet relaxing beauty to the gaming floor, restaurants and restrooms. For slot players, the machines are placed on ergonomic tables, complete with comfortable footrests. Blackjack tables are lined with an elegant wooden border rail with openings for ashtrays and cup holders.
The place is loaded with high-tech gadgetry, including two “Towers of Power” that each feature 16 plasma TVs.
Ance has the building’s intricate floor plan well memorized as a result of giving dozens of tours. She leads visitors from room to room, up and down floors, unveiling Turtle Creek’s roomy restrooms, its spacious cloakroom and the state-of-the-art ventilation system that doesn’t recycle air, but pumps in fresh air from the outside.

TRIBAL HISTORY
Unlike some other casinos that splash tribal art throughout their facilities, the Turtle Creek Hotel has dedicated a “cultural corridor,” which houses tribal artwork and tells the history of the Grand Traverse Band. Nearby is a boutique for hotel guests to browse and shop.
The casino’s large gaming floor will feature some 1,300 slot and video poker machines, 42 table games and a poker room, featuring 10 tables and its own bar and waiting area. The table game pits also have their own bar areas.
If you work up an appetite during a gaming session, Turtle Creek offers some distinct dining choices:
• Bourbon 72 is an upscale steakhouse type of eatery, featuring a huge custom wine rack and comforting fireplace. While promising elegance, entrees are still expected to be in the $20-22 price range.
•The spacious terrazzo-tiled Seasons Buffet features several different food stations and will seat about 180 comfortably.
• The Deli features fun red-and-white tile and will offer a wide selection of deli foods and beverages.
• On the third floor, The Coffee Spoon is available for those who want a coffee and a quick nosh during the day. At night, it’ll transform into a hipper wine and martini bar. Near the coffee bar is a relaxing area where customers can sit near the fireplace, sip their java and enjoy a great overview of the expansive gaming floor.
Another great drawing card will be the Level III lounge which features a center bar, several plasma TVs, cozy seating, a DJ booth and a stage. Colored globes add a festive air to Level III, which also features an outdoor party deck.
There’s a specially-designated high limit area with gaming tables and slots, plus a high limit lounge. For some high rollers, there’s also an underground parking area, complete with a car wash.
After the grand opening, demolition is expected to begin in July on the current Turtle Creek Casino, according to Carlson.


 
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