Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Features · The sky‘s the limit
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The sky‘s the limit

Erin Cowell - June 9th, 2008
It’s 4 a.m., and the phone rings.
“Hello Jeff,” I say, half asleep.
“Weather looks good. We’ll see you at 4:30,” he says, in his usual chipper voice.
My eyes are still closed as I roll out of bed. I’m too tired to make coffee, so I slap myself on the cheek. I get dressed and head out the door.
When I drive to work, even the stoplights are asleep. They remind me with their blinking lights, telling early commuters they should go back to bed. But as the rest of Northern Michigan sleeps, I’m on my way to help launch a hot air balloon.
Last summer I started working for Grand Traverse Balloons. I had never been in a hot air balloon, nor did I know the logistics of flying one. My boyfriend, a crewman of four years for the company, had convinced me to apply.
This will be my second summer crewing, and since graduating college this spring, I have recently started my job as the office manager, or “answerer of the phone calls.” I never knew how many people want a hot air balloon ride to be part of their summer adventure, until now.
Yes, there are faster modes of transportation. They get us from point A to point B without much attention paid to what’s in between. We have cars to get us to work and airplanes that take us to Hawaii. And although ballooning may be considered an old technology, it hasn’t lost its appeal. Cars will pull off to the side of the road, their passengers craning their necks upward to catch a glimpse of the flying, colorful orb.

Although our feet never leave the ground, I’ve learned that our job as crewmen is important.
We have one simple duty: help launch and land a safe flight while providing a memorable experience for the passengers. No one has more of that responsibility than my boss, owner and pilot Jeff Geiger. To assure he has little to worry about in the air, every flight follows a step-by-step process from beginning to end.
During that process, we deal with not only expensive equipment but very large and heavy equipment. The wicker basket built to hold 10 passengers, plus pilot, weighs more than 1,000 pounds. And a heavy basket means a heavy-duty balloon. Jeff’s current balloon, respectively dubbed, “On Target,” is made of 210,000 cubic feet of nylon fabric. We in the balloon business call this fabric “the envelope.”
It fits into a comparatively small canvas bag that must be packed after each flight. Sweat pours from our foreheads when we pack those 600 pounds of fabric into a three-by-six-foot bag. So, to lighten the work load, we encourage passengers to participate in this “authentic ballooning experience.”
The envelope is tall, to say the least. At 80 feet tall, it’s higher than an eight story building. The manufacturer, Cameron Balloons, is based in Ann Arbor. Cameron built the Breitling Orbiter III, the first hot air balloon to fly around the world.
Jeff’s balloon isn’t built to fly around the world, but it can withstand up to 500 flight hours. This summer, “On Target” is nearly halfway through its life expectancy at 200.

Before each flight, the envelope is laid out on whatever grassy field we’re at for the day. To fill it with air, two crewmen control inflator fans while two others control the top vent. We do this by attaching a flap with Velcro strips. Each strip has a number, which corresponds to its placement on the main fabric.
With the fans on high, the nylon fabric monster unfolds itself. Its belly fills and rolls about the grass. Then, as if giving it life, Jeff turns on the pilot lights and sends a stream of hot propane gas into the colorful orb. The balloon seems to roar with each shot of hot air and rises with a smooth, fluid motion.
This is when passengers start to get excited. We tell them to watch out for holes and other hazardous objects as they step back to take in the massive view. Ironically, this time is also the most hazardous. One woman, trying to get the best angle for a picture, once stumbled into a gopher hole and broke her ankle. Fortunately, she wasn’t a passenger and, after they made sure she had a way to the hospital, her family jumped into the balloon and ended up having a marvelous flight.
Gopher holes aside, safety is our number one concern. Before the flight, each passenger is given a Federal Aviation Administration mandated life vest and told about the emergency lifeboats attached to the side of the basket. Parachutes would make more sense to me, but if you’re going to fly in Northern Michigan, there’s always a chance you may go swimming.
According to Jeff, the beauty of flying in this area is also the most difficult part. We have a large amount of water, which includes several nearby lakes and both arms of Grand Traverse Bay.
“It’s easier to fly in other places,” Jeff says, “but this area is one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever flown.”
Jeff, who started out as a crewmember and earned pilot certification in 1986, has flown all over the world – California, Mexico and Africa, to name a few.

I have personally gotten to know the Traverse City area better, just by taking the numerous back roads while chasing. Crewmembers follow the balloon in chase vehicles to meet it when it lands. In the process, we tend to accumulate a parade of vehicles with people wanting to see the action. Sometimes they can get in the way, blocking an essential entrance to a field or driving painstakingly slow at balloon-watching speeds.
And because it literally goes wherever the wind blows it, “On Target” doesn’t always take off where it lands, thus, the importance of Jeff having a close relationship with local land owners.
Mark Bancroft, of Rolling Meadows Farms, just south of Traverse City, even takes offense when Geiger doesn’t land on his 300-acre property.
“We wish he would do it more often,” Bancroft says. “It’s kind of a novelty when he does land. The neighbors come out and see it. They’ll talk about it at church the next day.”
Sometimes landowners get involved by helping us pack up the envelope. Bancroft and his sons have helped on numerous occasions, using the hard-working discipline only farmers possess to get the job finished quickly. Afterwards, it’s a firm handshake and an invitation to land there again.
Geiger wouldn’t have been so welcome 200 years ago. When ballooning started in France, farmers emerged from their houses with pitchforks after spotting the alien-looking craft landing in their fields. So, to show they were harmless, balloonists brought champagne to offer the landowners – a tradition that stands today.

Sometimes I find myself knocking on a door, a dog barking from somewhere inside, and a landowner opening the door warily with the suspicion that I am there to sell them something. I quickly say, “Hi, my name is Erin from Grand Traverse Balloons and this may sound like a weird question; but, can we land our hot air balloon in your hay field?”
I never expect pitchforks, but offer gift certificates and champagne just in case. They look at me surprised and don’t answer right away. But when I add the deal-sealer that they can watch, shoes go on, Fluffy gets told to “be good,” and they’re running with me to the backyard.
Although I’ve learned a great deal about ballooning, I’ve also learned a lot about people. I have found adults can still be young. They are like little children – scared, excited, curious. They wave their arms in excitement as the basket lifts weightlessly into the sky and laugh when it skids back down to Earth.
When I see honeymooners, sisters keeping a pact or a woman celebrating her 80th birthday, I appreciate the role I play in their adventure. We may always be rushing from A to B and worrying about the gas that gets us there. But, we will always find time to glide, and just go wherever the winds blow us.
It’s those moments when I really love my job, and I really don’t mind waking up so early. But then again, I always enjoy a sunset.

Interested? Check out their website at www.grandtraverseballoons.com.

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