Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · The Great American Hamburger
. . . .

The Great American Hamburger

Rick Coates - June 9th, 2008
The Great American
Hamburger
Where would summer be without it?
“Hamburger America”
By George Motz
The Running Press
$19.95



Sure, that old saying bills “apple pie” as American, but nothing says American like a juicy hamburger. Just ask filmmaker and author George Motz. Last month his book, “Hamburger America: A State-By-State Guide To 100 Great Burger Joints,” was released by The Running Press.
Now, usually movies are inspired by a great book, but “Hamburger America” was inspired by the documentary film Motz began in 2001. He had this idea of traveling the country, seeking out the best burger joints. The film focuses on what Motz describes as “eight historically significant hamburger counters in America.”
Released in 2005, the film won three Emmys, 12 Broadcast Design Awards, a Telly Award and a James Beard nomination for its contributions in recognizing America’s most iconic food. The documentary has even become required viewing for students at Princeton University who take the food course.

1,000 BURGER JOINTS
To identify these eight hamburger counters, Motz visited 1,000 hamburger joints over five years. After the success of the film, he was encouraged to write the book.
“The real reason for writing this guide was to bring to the table the vast importance of the all-American burger joint and shine a light on this nation’s favorite food,” said Motz. “Looking into the not-so-distance future I see the McDonald’s hamburger as a reference point for many as to what a hamburger should look and taste like. This is not a good thing.”
Now, Motz doesn’t lay claim to his list as being the “100 Best” -- it’s simply a guide to “100 Great” hamburger joints. “Hamburger America” overall does a great job painting for the reader the cross section of the diverse American burger and the roadside stands, nostalgic diners, mom ‘n’ pop establishments and college town eateries that make them.
“Hamburger” is easy to navigate and doubles as a great coffee table book and travel guide. The burger joints are featured by state, so the reader may flip through the book when traveling to a particular state, to find out Motz recommendations.
Each joint is profiled in a manner that captures the personality and atmosphere of the place in addition to its specialty burger. Motz gets behind the scenes and goes into great detail on the different techniques these diners use to make tasty burgers. For example, at Miller’s Bar in Dearborn, Michigan, Motz lets the reader know that the burger is ground fresh daily beginning at 4 a.m. and that “1,200 burgers are cooked daily on a griddle next to the bar that is no bigger than three feet.”

CHARACTER STUDY
“Hamburger” is loaded with colorful photos. The book has a nice combination of burger photos along with both inside and outside shots of the eateries. Each profiled hamburger joint has the address, phone number, hours and website clearly identified.
At the heart of what makes this book such a great read is that Motz has captured the character and characters of each hamburger joint. The best hamburger places all go beyond having great burgers; they have interesting people who own the eateries, and prepare and serve the burgers.
Here is how Motz captures the personality of Krazy Jim’s Blimpy Burger in Ann Arbor:
“A visit to Blimpy Burger can be a daunting but rewarding experience. Theatrically, the cooks behind the counter engage in a sort of Soup Nazi berating of the customers who do not follow the cafeteria-style rules for ordering.
‘Just answer the questions I am asking you,’ grill cook Brian told a group of newcomers the first time I visited. In reality, the rules are there to help you, not scare you.”
Motz also does a great job in giving the history of each diner. He includes comical tales of his travels, including his travel companion: his vegetarian wife. Most the of the burgers Motz has in his book are all under $5.
“Bigger and more expensive are not always better,” said Motz. “I tried to select burgers and places that capture the spirit of the American hamburger. I chose places that the reader would want to go and try.”
The book comes with a DVD of Motz award winning documentary, along with a fold-out “hamburger map.”
On average Motz ate five burgers
a day. He suggests that readers not try and do the same. He took breaks and stayed at “hotels that had exercise equipment.” Despite being a number one consumer of burgers, Motz has maintained his slender waistline. He attributes it to “moderation” (if five burgers a day is moderation, what amount is considered gorging?).
Certainly “Hamburger America” will become as much about who is not in the book as who is in. Everybody who loves burgers will have their case and argument for their favorite places. For me, Don’s Drive In, Bubba’s, Mode’s and The Chef’s Inn in Traverse City are all worthy of consideration.
The book does inspire the reader to want to gas up the car and head down the road in search of America’s best burgers. Though with gas prices now costing more per gallon than most burgers, that search might best be made closer to home.
For additional details on the“Hamburger America” book and documentary, check out hamburgeramerica.com.


 
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