Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Letters · Letters 6/23/08
. . . .

Letters 6/23/08

- June 23rd, 2008
Swan song
Over the last seven years, I’ve devoted myself and a great deal of my time and dedication to the music scene here in Northern Michigan.
I‘ve been involved with organizing the food drive for the Tom Wright Project at the Dennos Museum. I‘ve created the M.E.P. program for Grand Traverse probationary youths at Northstar productions.
I helped create a successful battle of the bands, have formed several bands, and played for such charitable causes as the motorcycle rodeo for disabled veterans, for the Betsie River Labor Day disabled veterans party. I‘ve hosted several open mic shows and opened a studio where local musicians can come to practice for little or no money at all. It’s not about the money, it’s about the music, it’s about the people.
On June 4 I received several phone calls informing me of an attack on my character and my name. The callers wondered if this was a stage bit for the audience by Steve Normandin on the radio. Who is Steve Normandin? He’s better known as Omelette of WKLT’s Omelette and Finster morning show. I was called a liar, a backstabber and manipulative, and in past weeks received calls regarding comments they made on the air, stating my band, The Mob, had broken up.
You wonder why? I’ll tell you. I supported Omelette and Finster from the moment they hit the air, thinking here’s a couple of guys that are all about the people. I donated my time to record a demo CD for the show featuring Finster singing “I’ve been everywhere, man.” I even helped create the Twisted Finster band out of my studio, holding auditions for the project as well as rehearsals. Bet you readers and listeners didn’t know that.
Hell, I even got Mister Windy a job! All because I believed they were for the people. But they’re not... they’re about the ratings!
Here’s where it all goes wrong: earlier this year I held auditions for a female vocalist for my band, The Mob. Many came, many tried, but we chose the best. This woman is a single mother with a heart of gold and a voice to match. Her name is Crystal Wilcox. You readers and listeners might know her as 95.5 The Zone‘s very own Mizz Crystal.
We chose her for her talents, not her radio connection, all in the name of creating a more entertaining aspect to our fans.
But Omelette and Finster seem to think I’ve betrayed them and have taken it upon themselves to ridicule me ON THE AIR over this!
Now I know radio stations are competitive, but I never knew they could be so childish. Isn’t there enough anger and hatred in this world? Isn’t life just a little too short for such pettiness? Does Traverse City have to tune in and hear one of their very own being torn apart by a Northern Michigan wanna-be with a radio show? As far as the Godfather is concerned, Steve Normandin is no more than a fudgie with a microphone and a sidekick.

Don Swan • TC

Take Lyme seriously
I am enraged at the number of people that have written letters to the editor of this publication, critical of the doctors that diagnose and treat lyme disease.
As one who has experienced some improvement from such treatment after years of debilitating symptoms, I am very grateful my doctor stuck her neck out to do so.
Interestingly there was a recent WebMD article that reports new research indicating that not only is Lyme disease a reality, the particular strain found here in the U.S. is the same virulent strain found in Europe. Those criticizing doctors that diagnose and treat patients with Lyme, or bash folks that have Lyme disease are in for a very rude awakening. As time goes by, few will be left that won’t have personal experience -- either themselves or someone close to them - with Lyme disease and co-infections. Count on it.

Diane Bailey • SE Michigan

Bring back our trains
Back in 1910 before the automobile changed the American lifestyle, railways ruled. In those days the children of Redridge here in the U.P. went to school by train. The Soo Line Copper Country Limited ran from Calumet to Chicago. Groceries came to the Copper Country by rail to the Cahodas-Paoli wholesale grocery and were delivered by horse and wagon to various locations around the Keweenaw. Michigan was interlaced by railways.
The automobile freed us from train schedules and one-by-one rail service was shut down. The rail bed and tracks remained, but they were taken up. That was a mistake.
In 1992 I wrote about the consequences of the end of oil. (“Big Changes facing us when world oil supply runs out” -- Daily Mining Gazette) and now it’s happening. With the end of affordable oil, we must look for alternatives.
Electric cars require batteries that require expensive exotic metals which, in turn, need lots of fresh water for production. Water is also in short supply. You cannot maintain the current fleet of airliners on canola oil and ethanol, for it would take all of the arable land in the country to produce biofuels, leaving nothing for food production.
In the 1950s, thanks to the vision of President Eisenhower, we created the interstate highway system. Now those highways are wearing out and driving on them is getting more and more expensive.
What we need now, as air travel becomes a luxury for the rich, is a return of the railway. With new technology, magnetic trains can travel at 240 miles an hour, outperforming airlines in portal-to-portal service.
It’s too bad the rails were taken up. The snowmobile trails that occupy those roadbeds won’t be much use when recreation vehicles disappear for lack of fuel. We need those road beds for future light rail commuters and connections to big cities when there are no other alternatives. Vision anyone? Or shall we wait for a crisis of economic collapse first?

Harley Sachs • Houghton

Come back Home
When can our troops come home from Iraq? “That’s not too important,” said John McCain when he was asked this month on NBC’s “Today” show. But how does that sound to families who have a loved one serving in Iraq, who live for the day when they can see their child, spouse, or parent again, alive and in one piece? I thought McCain was out of touch with us before, but this takes the cake.
From what McCain has said about continuing his war in Iraq, he does not care one bit about what most of us want. Most Iraqis want us out of their country, too. But he has said he would keep us in Iraq for another five years, or as he excitedly told one reporter, maybe “a hundred years” or “a thousand or million years”. What mood swings the man has!

Doug Long • New Mexico

McCain said in March of this year, “No one has supported President Bush on Iraq more than I have”. Yet now he conveniently tries to distance himself from Bush. If McCain is elected president, we will be dragged down by another four years of Bush policies.

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5