Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Myers Granary
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Myers Granary

Danielle Horvath - July 14th, 2008
Looking for a piece of Great Lakes memorabilia or an authentic signed Fred Bear hunting bow? Or maybe you’re a comic book collector in search of that one special issue? Chances are you can find all that and more at Myers Granary & Antique Market in downtown Beulah.
A “must stop” for many collectors on the Northern Michigan antiques trail, the building is as interesting as its contents. The massive wooden structure, just a block off downtown and Crystal Lake, was built in 1907. At one time it included a feed and grain mill with a milk house and artesian well “cooler” in the front portion. It housed coal that was brought in by rail from the 1920s to ‘40s, and in its later years it was a farmers cooperative. In the 1970’s the building operated as the Beulah Lumber Company.

TRANSFORMATION
In 1984, Basil Myers rescued the turn-of-the-century structure from deterioration and embarked on more than a decade of renovation, transforming it into one of the most memorable antique markets in Northern Michigan.
His first idea was to turn it into a bed and breakfast country inn. But Myers had a life-long love of antiques and collectables, including a substantial primitive farm collection that he had begun while living in the Detroit area, so he changed his mind and began renovating the 10,000-square-foot space into an antique market instead.
“I began renovating the back portion because it was the easiest,” Myers said. “It was a long-term project that just evolved as we went.”
In the summer of 1989 he opened for business, starting what is now known as “the granary family” which consists of about 20 exhibitors.
The three-phase renovation included demolishing the built-for-a-lifetime coal bins. All the fir lumber was saved and used upstairs in beautifully refurbished living quarters. The old grain bins are now rooms with nearly 16-foot high walls and are where the dealers have their “open air” booth spaces. The rooms still retain the original vertical ladders, which accessed the bins from above. The high ceilings lend openness to the upstairs, and the additions of skylights, sliding glass doors and decking add to the ambience.

NEW BLOOD
Now in its 21st year, Basil’s son Jed took over The Granary when he retired in 2005.
Jed has a graphic design degree from CMU but says it just sort of happened that he is now running the family business.
“I started selling sports memorabilia when I was about 15 and then worked all my summers here with dad, so I’ve grown up around it. I feel very comfortable here. When Dad decided to retire, it seemed like the natural thing for me to do. I like helping people find unusual things. It’s pretty hard to not walk out of here without some kind of unique treasure.”
Jed has made some changes in the ways things are arranged, and at 28, brings a youthful perspective to the world of antiques and collectables.
“I think the Internet has hurt the general antique malls, with eBay and craigslist and sites like that,” he offered. “The market is flooded with all kinds of items that used to be hard to find. But a lot of our customers enjoy walking through the old building and people still want to come in and touch things. We have such an amazing collection that there is something here for everyone, and many things can still be used – it’s the ultimate form of recycling.”
Along with the great variety of antiques and collectables, you’ll also find the Leelanau Wine Cellars wine tasting center, now in its 13th year, at Myers Granary, where Jed is often the one pouring the wine and will be happy to take you on a tour of the place upon request. Gourmet Michigan and local food products are also available.
Myers Granary is open seven days a week through October: Mon.-Sat., 10 – 6; Sunday, 12-6. Call 231-882-9422 or email myersgranary@charter.net.


 
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