Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · Mental Health is...
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Mental Health is everyone‘s business

Leslie Sladek - June 28th, 2007
A long list of politicians and rulers throughout time have had mental health diagnoses.
At some point, most of us will suffer from stress, anxiety and/or depression. These often come with changes in one’s life; i.e., moving, childbirth, a new job; or from financial troubles, the loss of a job, friend or family member. This may be how mental illness starts out, but with proper treatment and/or medication, life returns to happy contentment again for most.
For others the symptoms are worse and mental health can be a life-debilitating event. The severity of the illness can affect not only the people themselves but their family, their ability to work or go to school, their finances, and the ability to function as they once had.
The good news is that we are on the cutting edge of change.
Today, we do recover and lead lives that are often more satisfying than prior to the diagnosis. With many new medications, evidence based treatments, therapy, and the hope and belief in recovery by those who serve the people with mental illness, people can and do recover.
I know this as I am in recovery and moving beyond. What is recovery? That depends on with whom you speak; recovery is unique to all.
For me, recovery is seeing my life clearly; having hope through the many trials and problems life puts on my plate; seeing a future that I can work toward filled with goals and dreams; and always having the necessities in life, including food, shelter, transportation, health, and relationships. Recovery can be challenging, but those of us who walk this path find a resilience we never knew existed.
The national consensus statement on recovery defines it as: “a journey of healing and transformation enabling a person with a mental health problem to live a meaningful life in a community of his or her choice while striving to achieve his or her full potential.”
The President’s Freedom Commission on Mental Health reiterates these principles and stresses that recovery is to be expected. The Governor’s Mental Health Commission emphasizes recovery as well.
Michigan is in the midst of transforming the public mental health system to one that is recovery based. Closer to home, Northern Lakes Community Mental Health is working to this end also. New grants for family psychosocial education, recovery, anti-stigma, and other initiatives aid in this change. The funds are used to assist individuals with mental illness to recover through various means such as: speakers’ panels, community inclusion activities, the arts, and job skills.
Peer specialists across the state are being hired, trained, tested and certified to work with peers, to instill hope and share their stories. (Yes, we’ve been there!) They provide a service to other consumers, assisting and encouraging them in their recovery journey.
Let us remember that mental illness is real, common and treatable; and recovery is not only possible, but to be expected. There is hope!

Leslie Sladek is employed as a customer service representative at Northern Lakes Community Mental Health. She is one of the first peer specialists in Michigan to receive certification to serve as mentors to others. She serves on the Michigan Recovery Council and the state board of directors for the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

 
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