Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · Mental Health is...
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Mental Health is everyone‘s business

Leslie Sladek - June 28th, 2007
A long list of politicians and rulers throughout time have had mental health diagnoses.
At some point, most of us will suffer from stress, anxiety and/or depression. These often come with changes in one’s life; i.e., moving, childbirth, a new job; or from financial troubles, the loss of a job, friend or family member. This may be how mental illness starts out, but with proper treatment and/or medication, life returns to happy contentment again for most.
For others the symptoms are worse and mental health can be a life-debilitating event. The severity of the illness can affect not only the people themselves but their family, their ability to work or go to school, their finances, and the ability to function as they once had.
The good news is that we are on the cutting edge of change.
Today, we do recover and lead lives that are often more satisfying than prior to the diagnosis. With many new medications, evidence based treatments, therapy, and the hope and belief in recovery by those who serve the people with mental illness, people can and do recover.
I know this as I am in recovery and moving beyond. What is recovery? That depends on with whom you speak; recovery is unique to all.
For me, recovery is seeing my life clearly; having hope through the many trials and problems life puts on my plate; seeing a future that I can work toward filled with goals and dreams; and always having the necessities in life, including food, shelter, transportation, health, and relationships. Recovery can be challenging, but those of us who walk this path find a resilience we never knew existed.
The national consensus statement on recovery defines it as: “a journey of healing and transformation enabling a person with a mental health problem to live a meaningful life in a community of his or her choice while striving to achieve his or her full potential.”
The President’s Freedom Commission on Mental Health reiterates these principles and stresses that recovery is to be expected. The Governor’s Mental Health Commission emphasizes recovery as well.
Michigan is in the midst of transforming the public mental health system to one that is recovery based. Closer to home, Northern Lakes Community Mental Health is working to this end also. New grants for family psychosocial education, recovery, anti-stigma, and other initiatives aid in this change. The funds are used to assist individuals with mental illness to recover through various means such as: speakers’ panels, community inclusion activities, the arts, and job skills.
Peer specialists across the state are being hired, trained, tested and certified to work with peers, to instill hope and share their stories. (Yes, we’ve been there!) They provide a service to other consumers, assisting and encouraging them in their recovery journey.
Let us remember that mental illness is real, common and treatable; and recovery is not only possible, but to be expected. There is hope!

Leslie Sladek is employed as a customer service representative at Northern Lakes Community Mental Health. She is one of the first peer specialists in Michigan to receive certification to serve as mentors to others. She serves on the Michigan Recovery Council and the state board of directors for the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

 
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