Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Art · The art of the latte
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The art of the latte

Katie Huston - July 26th, 2007
“Coffee?” Noel Trapp offers before I’ve even pulled out my notepad. He looks like a beatnik poet in a shirt that says “Viva Barrista” over a skull and... crossbones? What are those, I ask?
“Portafilters,” he tells me. Portafilters? I don’t know this lingo; I only began drinking coffee a few months ago. And what is a barrista?
Portafilters hold the coffee grounds in an espresso machine. And a barrista is an expert at preparing espresso-based coffee drinks, I find out, as Trapp pours the frothy milk into my latte in a way that creates a foamy white heart on top.
He’s doing what’s known as “latte art” -- something I didn’t even know existed, although apparently, at coffee shops on the West Coast, it’s standard fare.
“Essentially you’re creating a canvas,” Trapp explains, shaking the pitcher of milk gently back and forth to create a delicate leaf on top of his own latte. This is what’s known as free-pouring, but sometimes he uses a thermometer, a screwdriver, or a leather needle to etch designs into the drinks. He can make elephants, skulls with halos, even dragons.
“Latte art is not hard,” Trapp says. “People are amazed by its visual effect, but that’s arguably the least important thing I’m doing. The hard part is knowing enough about coffee to control all the variables.”

The 28-year-old TC native certainly knows enough about coffee. He can tell you about coffee’s mythological origins--perhaps it was discovered by a goat herder in ancient Ethiopia. He can quote growth figures and raw crop costs. He can tell you about every step of the production process, from picking to roasting to brewing. And he’s more than happy to.
“Coffee’s just incredibly interesting,” Trapp says. “Green [unroasted] coffee is 600 chemical compounds. We can identify maybe two-thirds of them. One third can’t even be identified on the periodic table of elements. We don’t even know what coffee is.”
Wars have been fought over coffee, he says. There are many misconceptions; for example, a shot of espresso actually has less caffeine than a cup of coffee.
And coffee is big. It’s the world’s second-most traded commodity after oil. What was a $9 billion industry in 2005 is predicted to rise to $18 billion by 2012.
Trapp has worked at over two dozen coffee shops across the states since the age of 16. He currently works at TC’s Another Cuppa Joe, but is moving to Marquette in late July to head the coffee division of a coffee shop and wine-and-tapas bar called L’attitude.
He trains coffee shop staff with a quote by John Reskin, a 19th-century philosopher: “Taste is the only morality.” What really drives him, though, is sustainability. He’s passionate about helping people who have nothing.
“A barrista puts the face on coffee. We are, for most people, the only face they’ll ever see,” he says. However, hundreds of people contribute to every cup of coffee we drink; in fact, many people’s livelihoods depend on the industry.
“If my shop goes under, I could always get a McJob. They can’t. These are people who’ve been doing this for generations, these are people who have the culture imbued in them,” he says. “When I train my staff, it’s not just with the idea to treat people in front of us well. We’ve got to treat the people behind us well.”

He’s not a fan of fair trade, because it’s a model we’ve outgrown, he says. If farms want to be certified, they have to pay large amounts of money -- money they don’t have, and Fair Trade often takes only about 50% of their beans.
Instead, he supports Cafe Sustenables, claiming the program provides better resources and monetary compensation to farmers, emphasizing sustainability and traceability.
Trapp loves the taste of coffee. He usually has about six espresso shots per day--the equivalent of a 24-ounce cup of coffee--but not all at once.
He’s even tattooed his devotion to coffee. One shoulder sports a huge portafilter; the other, a tamper.
What makes a good coffee?
“Everything,” he replies. “Everything comes into play. They’ve gotta be good beans. You’ve gotta have a good crop to start with.” Taste also depends on processing methods, which are determined by culture.
“Most Americans are lulled into the idea that dark roast, French roast, is the best, because they’re smoky, they’re peaty,” he says. “There’s no palate challenge at all. You don’t have to guess -- you know what you’re drinking. Most of the time, dark roasts are used to hide the fact that they’ve used bad beans.”

The lighter the roast, the more you’ll taste where your coffee’s coming from, he explains. Central American coffees tend to be spicy, floral and citric. African coffees are laden with dark fruit flavors, like blueberries. “They don’t age as well when they get cold, but when they’re hot there’s nothing like an African coffee. They’re intensely delicate and very fragile,” he says. And Indonesian coffees? “Hell yes to Indonesian coffees,” he says. They’re earthy, peaty and mellow.
His favorite, depending on his mood, is either a traditional Italian-style latte or a wet macchiato: two espresso shots topped with one ounce of milk. A straight shot of espresso is also nice.
Tra[[ is as passionate about poetry and politics as he is about coffee. He studied poetry at the University of Arizona, where he won a prestigious Hattie Lockett award. His book, “An Experiment in Change,” was published in 2000, and another book is in the works.
He hopes to one day open a nonprofit that translates confusing legislation into everyday language. “No one can be truly responsible anymore. It makes it difficult to be a civic-minded citizen,” he says.
Perhaps one day he’ll combine that mission with his own coffeeshop. “It should be a place where you can perch one Democrat, one Republican, and one Green Party member and say, the topic is X. Discuss.” He hopes to offer workshops on everything from sustainability and roasting profiles to local politics and “what’s muddying the waters.”
In short, it would be what every coffee shop should be--”a revolutionary space,” he says.

For more information about Cafe Sustenables and UTZ, visit www.sancristocafe.com and www.utzkapeh.com.
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