Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Ryan Shay
. . . .

Ryan Shay

Erin Cowell - July 21st, 2008
Ryan Shay was an elite runner. Among his accomplishments, he was a five-time national road racing champion, winning the 2003 U.S. marathon, 2003 and 2004 half-marathon, and the 2004 20k and 2005 15k races. Before then, he ran at the University of Notre Dame, earning the school’s first national individual track title by winning the 10,000 meter race.
But even before the national titles, Ryan Shay had developed himself as a running marvel in his school days at Central Lake High School. Before winning 11 state high school titles, he entered the sport in junior high by following in the footsteps of his four older siblings. Shay not only lived in a household of runners, but was surrounded by a running community of Central Lake friends.
Shay collapsed and died during the 2008 Olympic Marathon Trials in
New York last November due to an enlarged heart. News of Shay’s death spread internationally throughout the running community and hit home in Northern Michigan.

A RACE IS BORN
This January, Ryan’s father, Joe Shay, met at a local restaurant with family friends Matt Peterson, Doug Drenth and Douglas Bergmann. The three ran track for Charlevoix High School and continued their running careers together at Central Michigan University. They told Joe they wanted to do something for Ryan. Their idea was to create a memorial run that would coincide with another memorial race set during the Charlevoix Venetian Festival.
Drenth’s brother, Jeff, an elite runner himself, passed away in 1986 from an irregular heartbeat. The Drenth Memorial Foot Race is in its 30th consecutive year. Joining it this year will be the first annual Ryan Shay Mile set for July 26.
The idea for the race came to Peterson, Drenth and Bergmann when they were out on one of their runs. At first, the three weren’t sure if Joe would agree to have a race in his son’s name.
“When we contacted the Shays, we really didn’t know what they would say. They’ve turned down other offers to have memorial races named in their son’s honor,” Bergmann said.
However, on that January day in that local restaurant, Joe Shay said yes.
“It really means a lot to us,” Bergmann added. “There’s been a lot of human interest around Ryan’s story. We’re trying to do something that will be unique and long lasting.”

$4,000 PURSE
The race, itself, won’t last too long – just one mile. However, The Ryan Shay Mile is not just an ordinary foot race. It will invite just a handful of men and women to compete for a purse of $4,000, provided by Bergmann Marina. Runners from around the country were formally invited earlier this year. Runners also responded to a posting on Runmichigan.com asking them to submit proof of their personal bests. They are some of the best in their sport. Some runners include Derek Scott of Indiana, who ran a four minute mile, and Mandi Zemba, a Grand Valley State University student who holds a personal mile best of 4:41.
“It’s not an ‘anybody’ race,” said Matt Peterson, who teaches science at East Jordan Middle School. “We’re trying to attract, probably not Olympic caliber runners, but athletes who stand out in their field.”
The race will begin at 10:30 a.m. and is set to start prior to the Venetian Festival Parade. The race course starts at the corner of M-66 and US-31 and will finish near Bridge Street. The public is encouraged to come out and watch.
While the race is named in Ryan’s honor, Joe Shay said the three men assured they would alleviate any responsibility. The only thing they requested was if either Joe or his wife Susan could officially start the race. Shay said one of them will be there on Saturday.
“(Ryan) really was from Northern Michigan,” Shay said. “He would train out west but would always come home. He bought a piece of property down the road from us. He always planned on returning home to his roots.”
When reflecting on something that would honor Ryan, Joe Shay said he can’t think of anything better than the Ryan Shay Mile.
“I can’t begin to appreciate the work that these three gentlemen have done.”

For more information on the Ryan Shay Mile and the Drenth Memorial Foot Race, go to: www.venetianfestival.com
 
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