Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Garden Theater
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Garden Theater

Danielle Horvath - July 21st, 2008
Since 1924, the Garden Theater in downtown Frankfort has been an entertainment spot for local families, seasonal residents and tourists by offering first-run movies, live concerts, plays, recitals and even hosting town hall meetings and community gatherings. As of July of this year, a group of investors and community members are breathing new life into the old venue, which had fallen into disrepair and had been open summers only for the past five years.
The community effort is being led by Rick and Gennie Schmidt and Marci Brooks, who are both raising families in Frankfort and wanted to invest in the future of the area.
“It’s a Benzie County and Frankfort treasure,” Rick, Crystal Mountain Resort vice-president said. “And with the response we have gotten from the community, a lot of other people feel that way too.” To secure up-front capital for immediate needs, the partners offered two percent shares to 14 people who wanted to see the project go. “We could’ve sold more and we may in the future – we actually have a waiting list of people interested.”

HELPING HANDS
Because of a delayed closing on the sale, the new owners had just two weeks to open for the summer season, and were amazed when 35 people showed up for an afternoon with mops and brooms to spruce it up before the opening.
“Everyone is asking us – how can we help?” Rick said. “People are motivated on this, they want to walk by and see their theater open and thriving. There has been an overwhelming outpouring of community interest and support.”
The 650-seat theater needed a new sound system, which was purchased through Central Interconnect from Grand Rapids at a substantial discount. Local contractors Olsen Electric, Smith Plumbing and Turner Brush Network have donated time and lowered costs, and new exit signs were installed with donated labor. One community member has volunteered to refurbish all the old sconce lighting inside.
Since a good theater experience depends on a good seat, and the existing ones are too far gone to refurbish, a “Buy–A-Seat Campaign” has started where patrons can purchase a new seat for $200. The campaign has already received 100 pledges and hasn’t been completely publicized yet.
“The community helped me see the value in this hidden gem,” Marci said. “At first, my business mind was thinking it was a bad idea, but my gut said differently, and the community support is what pushed me over.”

YEAR-ROUND PLANS
The next immediate need is a new heating system so the Garden can be kept open year-round, something that’s essential to the continued renovation and use of the building.
“We have the advantage of being in a beautiful area, but we do get bad weather -- especially in the winter -- and with the gas prices like they are, people aren’t as eager to travel as far for entertainment.” Marci offered. “And there is still nothing like seeing a movie on the big screen.”
Even with the outpouring of community support, the Garden Theater still has major (and costly) improvements that will need to be made in the near future, including a new roof and movie projector updated to digital standards and quality.
“We hope the roof will hold on for a couple more years; we have done patching and will continue to monitor it,” Rick said. “And we have a vintage projector. about half of the movies are digital right now, so we will have to upgrade.” Both are big-ticket items, he admits, but is optimistic about what the theater can offer in the long run.
“Although we are not a non-profit, – we are not in this to make money. there will be no profits for many years –
everything will be turned back in to the project,” Rick explained.
Check the Garden’s current schedule online at frankfortgardentheater.com or by phone at 231-352-7561.

 
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