Letters

Letters 07-21-2014

Disheartened

While observing Fox News, it was disheartening to see what their viewers were subjected to. It seems the Republicans’ far right wing extremists are conveying their idealistic visions against various nationalities, social diversities or political beliefs with an absence of emotion concerning women’s health issues, children’s rights, voter suppression, Seniors, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid...

Things That Matter

All of us in small towns and large not only have the right to speak on behalf of our neighbors and ourselves, we have the duty and responsibility to do so -- and 238 years ago, we made a clear Declaration to do just that...

An Anecdote Driven Mind

So, is Thomas Kachadurian now the Northern Express’ official resident ranter? His recent factfree, hard-hearted column suggests it. While others complain about the poor condition of Michigan’s roads and highways, he rants against those we employ to fix them...

No On Prop 1

Are we being conned? Are those urging us to say “yes” to supposedly ”revenue neutral” ballot proposal 1 on August 5 telling us all the pertinent facts? Proposal 1 would eliminate the personal property tax businesses pay to local governments, replacing its revenue with a share of Michigan’s 6 percent use tax paid by us all on out-of-state purchases, hotel accommodations, some equipment rentals, and telecommunications...

Fix VA Tragedy

The problems within the Veterans Administration identified under former President Bush continue to hinder the delivery of quality health care to the influx of physically wounded and emotionally damaged young men and women...

Women Take Note

I find an interesting link between the Supreme Court Hobby Lobby and the crisis on the southern border. Angry protesters shout at children to go home. These children are scared, tired, hungry and thirsty, sent to US prisons awaiting deportation to a country where they may very likely be killed...


Home · Articles · News · Features · College: Things I wish I had...
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College: Things I wish I had known

Katie Huston - August 9th, 2007
When I left for college three years ago, my brain was packed with advice: from parents, from teachers, from older friends. As it turned out, though, there were some things I just had to learn the hard way – for myself. Here’s the advice I wish I could go back in time and give to my college-bound self...

Give yourself time to adjust
Everyone told me not to overschedule my first semester at college, but I didn’t listen. I’d always been busy in high school; I should have no problem taking 20 credits, playing clarinet in the marching band, and keeping up my dance training five to six days a week, right?
Wrong. Moving to college is a huge adjustment, and my first semester was miserable. I didn’t have time to go out on weekends or make good friends. I was constantly stressed about school, although looking back, my classes were pretty easy.
It’s important to get involved on campus: join an intramural sports team, write for the paper, or become an activist. However, don’t try to take on too much at once – get your bearings first.

Schedule morning classes
I won’t lie: 8 a.m. classes are pretty brutal, and I’ll never take one again. But when I didn’t have to be somewhere until 11:30, I slept all morning, and I was stuck studying all night. If you schedule a class at 9, you’ll get up and out much sooner, ready to make the most of your day. You’ll finish your work several hours earlier and have a lot more free time.

Take the teacher, not the class
During your first year, you probably won’t be able to avoid huge lectures and TAs with broken English. I got stuck with a world politics professor who spent more than half of each class ranting and showing anti-Bush political cartoons.
However, always try to “take the teacher, not the class.” An amazing professor can make anything exciting. Talk to other students in your department, especially upperclassmen, and when you’ve built up a good relationship with a professor, don’t be afraid to ask for his or her recommendations. You can also check out www.ratemyprofessors.com, where you can read student reviews of lecturers’ easiness, helpfulness and clarity.

Communicate with your roommate
My roommate was a light sleeper, but she never told me if something bothered her. “Do you want me to turn this light out? Should I go study downstairs?” I’d ask. “No, no, I’m fine,” she’d say, time and time again. I can sleep through anything, so I thought she was telling the truth. Later, I learned she was gossiping behind my back because she was afraid to confront me about what should’ve been easy to fix.
We worked it out, but if we’d had an honest discussion about what bothered us at the outset, a semester of tension could’ve been avoided. Set out roommate rules early in the year, and address topics like music, guests, sharing, personal belongings and security.

Find a study spot
It took me four semesters to realize that I work best in a library or coffee shop. When I tried to work in my dorm room, I was more likely to chat with my roommate, visit a friend, blog, or watch a movie next door.
If you really want to study efficiently, get offline! Facebook and online chatting can turn an hour of studying into four hours of procrastination--and the Internet will be there when you’re done.

Have fun
Four years may seem like forever, but they’re going to rush by. College is a lot of hard work, but it’s also one of the most fun times of your life. You’re no longer a kid, but you don’t yet have to assume full adult responsibilities. Academics are important, but so is enjoying your time. Squeeze the most out of it!

 
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