Letters

Letters 08-29-2016

Religious Bigotry President Obama has been roundly criticized for his apparent unwillingness to use the term “radical Islamic terrorism.” His critics seem to suggest that through the mere use of that terminology, the defeat of ISIS would be assured...

TC DDA: Focus On Your Mission What on earth is the Traverse City DDA thinking? Purchasing land around (not within) its TIF boundaries and then offering it at a discount to developers? That is not its mission. Sadly enough, it is already falling down on the job regarding what is its mission. Crosswalks are deteriorating all around downtown, trees aren’t trimmed, sidewalks are uneven. Why can’t the DDA do a better job of maintaining what it already has? And still no public restrooms downtown, despite all the tax dollars captured since 1997. What a joke...

European-Americans Are Boring “20 Fascinating People” in northern Michigan -- and every single one is European-American? Sorry, but this is journalistically incorrect. It’s easy for editors to assign and reporters to write stories about people who are already within their personal and professional networks. It’s harder to dig up stuff about people you don’t know and have never met. Harder is better...

Be Aware Of Lawsuit While most non-Indians were sleep walking, local Odawa leaders filed a lawsuit seeking to potentially have most of Emmet County and part of Charlevoix County declared within their reservation and thus under their jurisdiction. This assertion of jurisdiction is embedded in their recently constructed constitution as documentation of their intent...

More Parking Headaches I have another comment to make about downtown TC parking following Pat Sullivan’s recent article. My hubby and I parked in a handicap spot (with a meter) behind Mackinaw Brew Pub for lunch. The handicap spot happens to be 8-10 spaces away from the payment center. Now isn’t that interesting...

Demand Change At Women’s Resource Center Change is needed for the Women’s Resource Center for the Grand Traverse Area (WRCGT). As Patrick Sullivan pointed out in his article, former employees and supporters don’t like the direction WRCGT has taken. As former employees, we are downright terrified at the direction Juliette Schultz and Ralph Soffredine have led the organization...

Home · Articles · News · Features · College: Things I wish I had...
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College: Things I wish I had known

Katie Huston - August 9th, 2007
When I left for college three years ago, my brain was packed with advice: from parents, from teachers, from older friends. As it turned out, though, there were some things I just had to learn the hard way – for myself. Here’s the advice I wish I could go back in time and give to my college-bound self...

Give yourself time to adjust
Everyone told me not to overschedule my first semester at college, but I didn’t listen. I’d always been busy in high school; I should have no problem taking 20 credits, playing clarinet in the marching band, and keeping up my dance training five to six days a week, right?
Wrong. Moving to college is a huge adjustment, and my first semester was miserable. I didn’t have time to go out on weekends or make good friends. I was constantly stressed about school, although looking back, my classes were pretty easy.
It’s important to get involved on campus: join an intramural sports team, write for the paper, or become an activist. However, don’t try to take on too much at once – get your bearings first.

Schedule morning classes
I won’t lie: 8 a.m. classes are pretty brutal, and I’ll never take one again. But when I didn’t have to be somewhere until 11:30, I slept all morning, and I was stuck studying all night. If you schedule a class at 9, you’ll get up and out much sooner, ready to make the most of your day. You’ll finish your work several hours earlier and have a lot more free time.

Take the teacher, not the class
During your first year, you probably won’t be able to avoid huge lectures and TAs with broken English. I got stuck with a world politics professor who spent more than half of each class ranting and showing anti-Bush political cartoons.
However, always try to “take the teacher, not the class.” An amazing professor can make anything exciting. Talk to other students in your department, especially upperclassmen, and when you’ve built up a good relationship with a professor, don’t be afraid to ask for his or her recommendations. You can also check out www.ratemyprofessors.com, where you can read student reviews of lecturers’ easiness, helpfulness and clarity.

Communicate with your roommate
My roommate was a light sleeper, but she never told me if something bothered her. “Do you want me to turn this light out? Should I go study downstairs?” I’d ask. “No, no, I’m fine,” she’d say, time and time again. I can sleep through anything, so I thought she was telling the truth. Later, I learned she was gossiping behind my back because she was afraid to confront me about what should’ve been easy to fix.
We worked it out, but if we’d had an honest discussion about what bothered us at the outset, a semester of tension could’ve been avoided. Set out roommate rules early in the year, and address topics like music, guests, sharing, personal belongings and security.

Find a study spot
It took me four semesters to realize that I work best in a library or coffee shop. When I tried to work in my dorm room, I was more likely to chat with my roommate, visit a friend, blog, or watch a movie next door.
If you really want to study efficiently, get offline! Facebook and online chatting can turn an hour of studying into four hours of procrastination--and the Internet will be there when you’re done.

Have fun
Four years may seem like forever, but they’re going to rush by. College is a lot of hard work, but it’s also one of the most fun times of your life. You’re no longer a kid, but you don’t yet have to assume full adult responsibilities. Academics are important, but so is enjoying your time. Squeeze the most out of it!

 
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