Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · College: Things I wish I had...
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College: Things I wish I had known

Katie Huston - August 9th, 2007
When I left for college three years ago, my brain was packed with advice: from parents, from teachers, from older friends. As it turned out, though, there were some things I just had to learn the hard way – for myself. Here’s the advice I wish I could go back in time and give to my college-bound self...

Give yourself time to adjust
Everyone told me not to overschedule my first semester at college, but I didn’t listen. I’d always been busy in high school; I should have no problem taking 20 credits, playing clarinet in the marching band, and keeping up my dance training five to six days a week, right?
Wrong. Moving to college is a huge adjustment, and my first semester was miserable. I didn’t have time to go out on weekends or make good friends. I was constantly stressed about school, although looking back, my classes were pretty easy.
It’s important to get involved on campus: join an intramural sports team, write for the paper, or become an activist. However, don’t try to take on too much at once – get your bearings first.

Schedule morning classes
I won’t lie: 8 a.m. classes are pretty brutal, and I’ll never take one again. But when I didn’t have to be somewhere until 11:30, I slept all morning, and I was stuck studying all night. If you schedule a class at 9, you’ll get up and out much sooner, ready to make the most of your day. You’ll finish your work several hours earlier and have a lot more free time.

Take the teacher, not the class
During your first year, you probably won’t be able to avoid huge lectures and TAs with broken English. I got stuck with a world politics professor who spent more than half of each class ranting and showing anti-Bush political cartoons.
However, always try to “take the teacher, not the class.” An amazing professor can make anything exciting. Talk to other students in your department, especially upperclassmen, and when you’ve built up a good relationship with a professor, don’t be afraid to ask for his or her recommendations. You can also check out www.ratemyprofessors.com, where you can read student reviews of lecturers’ easiness, helpfulness and clarity.

Communicate with your roommate
My roommate was a light sleeper, but she never told me if something bothered her. “Do you want me to turn this light out? Should I go study downstairs?” I’d ask. “No, no, I’m fine,” she’d say, time and time again. I can sleep through anything, so I thought she was telling the truth. Later, I learned she was gossiping behind my back because she was afraid to confront me about what should’ve been easy to fix.
We worked it out, but if we’d had an honest discussion about what bothered us at the outset, a semester of tension could’ve been avoided. Set out roommate rules early in the year, and address topics like music, guests, sharing, personal belongings and security.

Find a study spot
It took me four semesters to realize that I work best in a library or coffee shop. When I tried to work in my dorm room, I was more likely to chat with my roommate, visit a friend, blog, or watch a movie next door.
If you really want to study efficiently, get offline! Facebook and online chatting can turn an hour of studying into four hours of procrastination--and the Internet will be there when you’re done.

Have fun
Four years may seem like forever, but they’re going to rush by. College is a lot of hard work, but it’s also one of the most fun times of your life. You’re no longer a kid, but you don’t yet have to assume full adult responsibilities. Academics are important, but so is enjoying your time. Squeeze the most out of it!

 
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