Letters

Letters 11-24-2014

Dangerous Votes You voted for Dr. Dan. Thanks!Rep. Benishek failed to cosponsor H.R. 601. It stops subsidies for big oil companies. He failed to cosponsor H.R. 1084. There is an exemption for hydraulic fracturing written into the Safe Drinking Water Act. H.R. 1084. It would require the contents of fracking fluids to be publicly disclosed to protect the public health.

Solar Is The Answer There have been many excellent letters about the need for our region, state and nation to take action on climate change. Now there is a viable solution to this ever-growing problem: Solar energy is the future.

Real Minimum Wage In 1966, a first class stamp cost 5 cents and minimum wage was $1.25. Today, a first class stamp is 49 cents, so federal minimum wage should be $11.25.

Doesn’t Seem Warmer I enjoy the “environmentalists” twisting themselves into pretzels trying to convince us that it is getting warmer. Sure it is... 

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College: Things I wish I had known

Katie Huston - August 9th, 2007
When I left for college three years ago, my brain was packed with advice: from parents, from teachers, from older friends. As it turned out, though, there were some things I just had to learn the hard way – for myself. Here’s the advice I wish I could go back in time and give to my college-bound self...

Give yourself time to adjust
Everyone told me not to overschedule my first semester at college, but I didn’t listen. I’d always been busy in high school; I should have no problem taking 20 credits, playing clarinet in the marching band, and keeping up my dance training five to six days a week, right?
Wrong. Moving to college is a huge adjustment, and my first semester was miserable. I didn’t have time to go out on weekends or make good friends. I was constantly stressed about school, although looking back, my classes were pretty easy.
It’s important to get involved on campus: join an intramural sports team, write for the paper, or become an activist. However, don’t try to take on too much at once – get your bearings first.

Schedule morning classes
I won’t lie: 8 a.m. classes are pretty brutal, and I’ll never take one again. But when I didn’t have to be somewhere until 11:30, I slept all morning, and I was stuck studying all night. If you schedule a class at 9, you’ll get up and out much sooner, ready to make the most of your day. You’ll finish your work several hours earlier and have a lot more free time.

Take the teacher, not the class
During your first year, you probably won’t be able to avoid huge lectures and TAs with broken English. I got stuck with a world politics professor who spent more than half of each class ranting and showing anti-Bush political cartoons.
However, always try to “take the teacher, not the class.” An amazing professor can make anything exciting. Talk to other students in your department, especially upperclassmen, and when you’ve built up a good relationship with a professor, don’t be afraid to ask for his or her recommendations. You can also check out www.ratemyprofessors.com, where you can read student reviews of lecturers’ easiness, helpfulness and clarity.

Communicate with your roommate
My roommate was a light sleeper, but she never told me if something bothered her. “Do you want me to turn this light out? Should I go study downstairs?” I’d ask. “No, no, I’m fine,” she’d say, time and time again. I can sleep through anything, so I thought she was telling the truth. Later, I learned she was gossiping behind my back because she was afraid to confront me about what should’ve been easy to fix.
We worked it out, but if we’d had an honest discussion about what bothered us at the outset, a semester of tension could’ve been avoided. Set out roommate rules early in the year, and address topics like music, guests, sharing, personal belongings and security.

Find a study spot
It took me four semesters to realize that I work best in a library or coffee shop. When I tried to work in my dorm room, I was more likely to chat with my roommate, visit a friend, blog, or watch a movie next door.
If you really want to study efficiently, get offline! Facebook and online chatting can turn an hour of studying into four hours of procrastination--and the Internet will be there when you’re done.

Have fun
Four years may seem like forever, but they’re going to rush by. College is a lot of hard work, but it’s also one of the most fun times of your life. You’re no longer a kid, but you don’t yet have to assume full adult responsibilities. Academics are important, but so is enjoying your time. Squeeze the most out of it!

 
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