Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Women in Art
. . . .

Women in Art

Kristi Kates - November 1st, 2007
Friday, November 2 is the day for the Women In Art lecture, as put on by artcenter Traverse City - and if you’re at all interested in art, artists, or art education, you’ll want to be there. The event is part of artcenter’s lecture series, designed to introduce artists, art historians, and lecturers to the community to encourage conversation and collaboration.
“Last month, we hosted Joe DeLuca, who had a retrospective showing at Gallery 50 throughout October, and next month, in addition to Women in Art, we will be welcoming Ed Wong-Ligda to speak on the importance of public art,” Amy Packard, artcenter educational coordinator, explains. “The Women in Art lecture is the result of lecturer Patty Pelizzari’s passion for art and an interest in women artists specifically. Our hope is that, if interest warrants, we could continue this exploration on a monthly basis, like a book club or salon with art and artists as the focus.”

WEALTH OF MATERIAL
Both Packard and Pelizzari say that there is a wealth of material to explore.
“This session will discuss broad ranges of topics and time periods, as well as styles of art by women artists,” Pelizzari explains. Packard continues, “our hope is that, following this initial overview, the group will guide future topics… for instance, Sofonisba Anguissola and other Renaissance artists one month; Faith Ringgold and contemporary painted story quilts the next.”
During this particular event, the group will be looking at slides of art and artists, and, as Packard puts it, will also possibly be doing some group art making “if the opportunity presents itself.”
“We envision a relaxed talk,” Packard says. “think of it as an art history lecture with wine and sweets, and an opportunity to question and comment freely throughout.”
So do the two women helming this event have favorite female artists?
“What is wonderful about this topic, as with many “stories” from art history, is that it’s often difficult to choose between the story and the artwork,” Pelizzari says. “some of the most fascinating stories may not represent the artwork that you admire the most or that pleases you most. The most fabulous work may come from the old story of hard work, talent and being in the right place at the right time.”

FULFILLING A MISSION
With artcenter Traverse City’s goal being to “always look at ways to fulfill our mission to encourage and promote art, artists and art education,” according to Packard, the lecture series is just a small part of what artcenter has to offer. Along with classes and workshops, artcenter also publishes the Art and Craft Trail Brochure, sponsors the Traverse Bay Outdoor Art Fair and The Holiday Art and Craft Show, and brings in nationally known artists for their Summer Workshop series. But this time around, it’s all about women’s contributions to art history.

ARTISTS FIRST
“What is most important to remember about looking at women artists throughout art history is not necessarily their contributions as women but their contributions as artists,” Pelizzari points out. “looking at art made by women opens our eyes to looking at all art in new ways, and encourages us to ask new questions. Certainly the Feminist Movement opened our eyes to a lack of knowledge about women artists in general, as well as opening the doors to new subjects and statements about being a woman and about art in general. It even opened doors for the serious consideration of new kinds of art or art forms that were largely ignored in the past.”
Those are insightful words from a knowledgeable person, which perhaps explains why Pelizzari will be head lecturer for this event. In addition to investigating women’s contributions to art history, the group will also discuss how feminism and the arts work together, and how they continue to have relevance in studying art and art history. The event will take place from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the artcenter. the suggested donation is $5 for members and $10 for non-members, and it’s also suggested that you call 231-941-9488 to RSVP.
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close