Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Women in Art
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Women in Art

Kristi Kates - November 1st, 2007
Friday, November 2 is the day for the Women In Art lecture, as put on by artcenter Traverse City - and if you’re at all interested in art, artists, or art education, you’ll want to be there. The event is part of artcenter’s lecture series, designed to introduce artists, art historians, and lecturers to the community to encourage conversation and collaboration.
“Last month, we hosted Joe DeLuca, who had a retrospective showing at Gallery 50 throughout October, and next month, in addition to Women in Art, we will be welcoming Ed Wong-Ligda to speak on the importance of public art,” Amy Packard, artcenter educational coordinator, explains. “The Women in Art lecture is the result of lecturer Patty Pelizzari’s passion for art and an interest in women artists specifically. Our hope is that, if interest warrants, we could continue this exploration on a monthly basis, like a book club or salon with art and artists as the focus.”

WEALTH OF MATERIAL
Both Packard and Pelizzari say that there is a wealth of material to explore.
“This session will discuss broad ranges of topics and time periods, as well as styles of art by women artists,” Pelizzari explains. Packard continues, “our hope is that, following this initial overview, the group will guide future topics… for instance, Sofonisba Anguissola and other Renaissance artists one month; Faith Ringgold and contemporary painted story quilts the next.”
During this particular event, the group will be looking at slides of art and artists, and, as Packard puts it, will also possibly be doing some group art making “if the opportunity presents itself.”
“We envision a relaxed talk,” Packard says. “think of it as an art history lecture with wine and sweets, and an opportunity to question and comment freely throughout.”
So do the two women helming this event have favorite female artists?
“What is wonderful about this topic, as with many “stories” from art history, is that it’s often difficult to choose between the story and the artwork,” Pelizzari says. “some of the most fascinating stories may not represent the artwork that you admire the most or that pleases you most. The most fabulous work may come from the old story of hard work, talent and being in the right place at the right time.”

FULFILLING A MISSION
With artcenter Traverse City’s goal being to “always look at ways to fulfill our mission to encourage and promote art, artists and art education,” according to Packard, the lecture series is just a small part of what artcenter has to offer. Along with classes and workshops, artcenter also publishes the Art and Craft Trail Brochure, sponsors the Traverse Bay Outdoor Art Fair and The Holiday Art and Craft Show, and brings in nationally known artists for their Summer Workshop series. But this time around, it’s all about women’s contributions to art history.

ARTISTS FIRST
“What is most important to remember about looking at women artists throughout art history is not necessarily their contributions as women but their contributions as artists,” Pelizzari points out. “looking at art made by women opens our eyes to looking at all art in new ways, and encourages us to ask new questions. Certainly the Feminist Movement opened our eyes to a lack of knowledge about women artists in general, as well as opening the doors to new subjects and statements about being a woman and about art in general. It even opened doors for the serious consideration of new kinds of art or art forms that were largely ignored in the past.”
Those are insightful words from a knowledgeable person, which perhaps explains why Pelizzari will be head lecturer for this event. In addition to investigating women’s contributions to art history, the group will also discuss how feminism and the arts work together, and how they continue to have relevance in studying art and art history. The event will take place from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the artcenter. the suggested donation is $5 for members and $10 for non-members, and it’s also suggested that you call 231-941-9488 to RSVP.
 
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