Letters

Letters 07-21-2014

Disheartened

While observing Fox News, it was disheartening to see what their viewers were subjected to. It seems the Republicans’ far right wing extremists are conveying their idealistic visions against various nationalities, social diversities or political beliefs with an absence of emotion concerning women’s health issues, children’s rights, voter suppression, Seniors, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid...

Things That Matter

All of us in small towns and large not only have the right to speak on behalf of our neighbors and ourselves, we have the duty and responsibility to do so -- and 238 years ago, we made a clear Declaration to do just that...

An Anecdote Driven Mind

So, is Thomas Kachadurian now the Northern Express’ official resident ranter? His recent factfree, hard-hearted column suggests it. While others complain about the poor condition of Michigan’s roads and highways, he rants against those we employ to fix them...

No On Prop 1

Are we being conned? Are those urging us to say “yes” to supposedly ”revenue neutral” ballot proposal 1 on August 5 telling us all the pertinent facts? Proposal 1 would eliminate the personal property tax businesses pay to local governments, replacing its revenue with a share of Michigan’s 6 percent use tax paid by us all on out-of-state purchases, hotel accommodations, some equipment rentals, and telecommunications...

Fix VA Tragedy

The problems within the Veterans Administration identified under former President Bush continue to hinder the delivery of quality health care to the influx of physically wounded and emotionally damaged young men and women...

Women Take Note

I find an interesting link between the Supreme Court Hobby Lobby and the crisis on the southern border. Angry protesters shout at children to go home. These children are scared, tired, hungry and thirsty, sent to US prisons awaiting deportation to a country where they may very likely be killed...


Home · Articles · News · Art · Women in Art
. . . .

Women in Art

Kristi Kates - November 1st, 2007
Friday, November 2 is the day for the Women In Art lecture, as put on by artcenter Traverse City - and if you’re at all interested in art, artists, or art education, you’ll want to be there. The event is part of artcenter’s lecture series, designed to introduce artists, art historians, and lecturers to the community to encourage conversation and collaboration.
“Last month, we hosted Joe DeLuca, who had a retrospective showing at Gallery 50 throughout October, and next month, in addition to Women in Art, we will be welcoming Ed Wong-Ligda to speak on the importance of public art,” Amy Packard, artcenter educational coordinator, explains. “The Women in Art lecture is the result of lecturer Patty Pelizzari’s passion for art and an interest in women artists specifically. Our hope is that, if interest warrants, we could continue this exploration on a monthly basis, like a book club or salon with art and artists as the focus.”

WEALTH OF MATERIAL
Both Packard and Pelizzari say that there is a wealth of material to explore.
“This session will discuss broad ranges of topics and time periods, as well as styles of art by women artists,” Pelizzari explains. Packard continues, “our hope is that, following this initial overview, the group will guide future topics… for instance, Sofonisba Anguissola and other Renaissance artists one month; Faith Ringgold and contemporary painted story quilts the next.”
During this particular event, the group will be looking at slides of art and artists, and, as Packard puts it, will also possibly be doing some group art making “if the opportunity presents itself.”
“We envision a relaxed talk,” Packard says. “think of it as an art history lecture with wine and sweets, and an opportunity to question and comment freely throughout.”
So do the two women helming this event have favorite female artists?
“What is wonderful about this topic, as with many “stories” from art history, is that it’s often difficult to choose between the story and the artwork,” Pelizzari says. “some of the most fascinating stories may not represent the artwork that you admire the most or that pleases you most. The most fabulous work may come from the old story of hard work, talent and being in the right place at the right time.”

FULFILLING A MISSION
With artcenter Traverse City’s goal being to “always look at ways to fulfill our mission to encourage and promote art, artists and art education,” according to Packard, the lecture series is just a small part of what artcenter has to offer. Along with classes and workshops, artcenter also publishes the Art and Craft Trail Brochure, sponsors the Traverse Bay Outdoor Art Fair and The Holiday Art and Craft Show, and brings in nationally known artists for their Summer Workshop series. But this time around, it’s all about women’s contributions to art history.

ARTISTS FIRST
“What is most important to remember about looking at women artists throughout art history is not necessarily their contributions as women but their contributions as artists,” Pelizzari points out. “looking at art made by women opens our eyes to looking at all art in new ways, and encourages us to ask new questions. Certainly the Feminist Movement opened our eyes to a lack of knowledge about women artists in general, as well as opening the doors to new subjects and statements about being a woman and about art in general. It even opened doors for the serious consideration of new kinds of art or art forms that were largely ignored in the past.”
Those are insightful words from a knowledgeable person, which perhaps explains why Pelizzari will be head lecturer for this event. In addition to investigating women’s contributions to art history, the group will also discuss how feminism and the arts work together, and how they continue to have relevance in studying art and art history. The event will take place from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the artcenter. the suggested donation is $5 for members and $10 for non-members, and it’s also suggested that you call 231-941-9488 to RSVP.
 
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