Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Art · The artistic life of Chuck Forman
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The artistic life of Chuck Forman

Priscilla Miller - December 31st, 2007
Chuck Forman’s interest in art was initially sparked by a seventh grade art teacher. She got him interested in oil painting, and after that, he was “hooked.” While attending Fordson High School in Dearborn, Michigan, he took courses in engineering and drafting, yet he also managed to get in three hours a day of art classes.
He began his career as an artist at the age of 17. When visiting his grandparents’ farm in the Traverse City area, he saw an ad in the local paper for an apprentice artist. He decided to answer the ad, and of the 72 applicants, Chuck was one of two selected for the job.
“From then on, everything snowballed and one job led to another,” he says.
He met his wife Anita one summer, while working as a lifeguard. Shortly
after they married, he hired into a studio in Lansing, Michigan and also owned a couple of art studios. After vacationing in the Torch Lake/Traverse City area for years, Forman decided that even if he had to get a job pumping gas, he was
going to move to this area. Within a month of moving, job offers started coming in.
With his background in engineering, he became a commercial illustrator, and also spent time as an architectural delineator (one who looks at a set of blueprints and draws a dimensional picture of what the finished building will look like). He once modeled for a magazine ad, and he and Anita both had a small part in the classic Mackinac-Island-filmed movie Somewhere In Time.
Forman was a fisherman, too, which leads to another story of how his art has infused his life. Forman once caught a trophy size fish, but Anita insisted that that fish was not going to hang on a wall in their home. So Forman laid the fish on paper, and traced around it. they ate his catch for dinner, and then, using the tracing made earlier, he proceeded to paint a picture of his fish and hung it on the wall.
In 2000, Forman was commissioned by the Alden State Bank to do their calendar. His paintings of buildings in the quaint village of Alden and scenery of the surrounding Antrim County area proved to be so popular that he is now working on a calendar for 2009. He has never considered his 40-plus years of working with watercolors to be a job; he carries a pad of paper and a small watercolor set with him at all times, and often paints on-site.
An intriguing painting of a man lounging on a long park bench hangs over the mantle in his living room. Names of family members and friends appear to be carved into the wood on the bench. Occasionally, a friend will not see their name on the bench and will ask Chuck where it is.
He says, “I tell them, it must be on the other side of the bench!”
Now in his mid-seventies, Forman says, “It’s slow down time” - but by the looks of his studio, you would not believe it. Watercolors that Forman has painted line the walls in a profusion of color. His home sits on property along the Torch River, and he admits it’s probably a good thing that he cannot see the river from his studio, because if he could, he would never get anything done.
Northern Michigan watercolorist Chuck Forman will have his works on display at the new artcenter Traverse City at 300 E. Front St. in January. Forman will also be volunteering his time to teach free classes in watercolor at the Little Red School House, to Rapid City School children in third to fifth grades on the second Saturday of each month from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. until June. In addition, his work may be seen on display at the Blue Heron Gallery in Elk Rapids; Adams Madams in Central Lake; the Gas Light Gallery in Petoskey; and by calling the Forman Studio at 231-322-6005.




 
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