Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · The artistic life of Chuck Forman
. . . .

The artistic life of Chuck Forman

Priscilla Miller - December 31st, 2007
Chuck Forman’s interest in art was initially sparked by a seventh grade art teacher. She got him interested in oil painting, and after that, he was “hooked.” While attending Fordson High School in Dearborn, Michigan, he took courses in engineering and drafting, yet he also managed to get in three hours a day of art classes.
He began his career as an artist at the age of 17. When visiting his grandparents’ farm in the Traverse City area, he saw an ad in the local paper for an apprentice artist. He decided to answer the ad, and of the 72 applicants, Chuck was one of two selected for the job.
“From then on, everything snowballed and one job led to another,” he says.
He met his wife Anita one summer, while working as a lifeguard. Shortly
after they married, he hired into a studio in Lansing, Michigan and also owned a couple of art studios. After vacationing in the Torch Lake/Traverse City area for years, Forman decided that even if he had to get a job pumping gas, he was
going to move to this area. Within a month of moving, job offers started coming in.
With his background in engineering, he became a commercial illustrator, and also spent time as an architectural delineator (one who looks at a set of blueprints and draws a dimensional picture of what the finished building will look like). He once modeled for a magazine ad, and he and Anita both had a small part in the classic Mackinac-Island-filmed movie Somewhere In Time.
Forman was a fisherman, too, which leads to another story of how his art has infused his life. Forman once caught a trophy size fish, but Anita insisted that that fish was not going to hang on a wall in their home. So Forman laid the fish on paper, and traced around it. they ate his catch for dinner, and then, using the tracing made earlier, he proceeded to paint a picture of his fish and hung it on the wall.
In 2000, Forman was commissioned by the Alden State Bank to do their calendar. His paintings of buildings in the quaint village of Alden and scenery of the surrounding Antrim County area proved to be so popular that he is now working on a calendar for 2009. He has never considered his 40-plus years of working with watercolors to be a job; he carries a pad of paper and a small watercolor set with him at all times, and often paints on-site.
An intriguing painting of a man lounging on a long park bench hangs over the mantle in his living room. Names of family members and friends appear to be carved into the wood on the bench. Occasionally, a friend will not see their name on the bench and will ask Chuck where it is.
He says, “I tell them, it must be on the other side of the bench!”
Now in his mid-seventies, Forman says, “It’s slow down time” - but by the looks of his studio, you would not believe it. Watercolors that Forman has painted line the walls in a profusion of color. His home sits on property along the Torch River, and he admits it’s probably a good thing that he cannot see the river from his studio, because if he could, he would never get anything done.
Northern Michigan watercolorist Chuck Forman will have his works on display at the new artcenter Traverse City at 300 E. Front St. in January. Forman will also be volunteering his time to teach free classes in watercolor at the Little Red School House, to Rapid City School children in third to fifth grades on the second Saturday of each month from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. until June. In addition, his work may be seen on display at the Blue Heron Gallery in Elk Rapids; Adams Madams in Central Lake; the Gas Light Gallery in Petoskey; and by calling the Forman Studio at 231-322-6005.




 
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