Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Art · The artistic life of Chuck Forman
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The artistic life of Chuck Forman

Priscilla Miller - December 31st, 2007
Chuck Forman’s interest in art was initially sparked by a seventh grade art teacher. She got him interested in oil painting, and after that, he was “hooked.” While attending Fordson High School in Dearborn, Michigan, he took courses in engineering and drafting, yet he also managed to get in three hours a day of art classes.
He began his career as an artist at the age of 17. When visiting his grandparents’ farm in the Traverse City area, he saw an ad in the local paper for an apprentice artist. He decided to answer the ad, and of the 72 applicants, Chuck was one of two selected for the job.
“From then on, everything snowballed and one job led to another,” he says.
He met his wife Anita one summer, while working as a lifeguard. Shortly
after they married, he hired into a studio in Lansing, Michigan and also owned a couple of art studios. After vacationing in the Torch Lake/Traverse City area for years, Forman decided that even if he had to get a job pumping gas, he was
going to move to this area. Within a month of moving, job offers started coming in.
With his background in engineering, he became a commercial illustrator, and also spent time as an architectural delineator (one who looks at a set of blueprints and draws a dimensional picture of what the finished building will look like). He once modeled for a magazine ad, and he and Anita both had a small part in the classic Mackinac-Island-filmed movie Somewhere In Time.
Forman was a fisherman, too, which leads to another story of how his art has infused his life. Forman once caught a trophy size fish, but Anita insisted that that fish was not going to hang on a wall in their home. So Forman laid the fish on paper, and traced around it. they ate his catch for dinner, and then, using the tracing made earlier, he proceeded to paint a picture of his fish and hung it on the wall.
In 2000, Forman was commissioned by the Alden State Bank to do their calendar. His paintings of buildings in the quaint village of Alden and scenery of the surrounding Antrim County area proved to be so popular that he is now working on a calendar for 2009. He has never considered his 40-plus years of working with watercolors to be a job; he carries a pad of paper and a small watercolor set with him at all times, and often paints on-site.
An intriguing painting of a man lounging on a long park bench hangs over the mantle in his living room. Names of family members and friends appear to be carved into the wood on the bench. Occasionally, a friend will not see their name on the bench and will ask Chuck where it is.
He says, “I tell them, it must be on the other side of the bench!”
Now in his mid-seventies, Forman says, “It’s slow down time” - but by the looks of his studio, you would not believe it. Watercolors that Forman has painted line the walls in a profusion of color. His home sits on property along the Torch River, and he admits it’s probably a good thing that he cannot see the river from his studio, because if he could, he would never get anything done.
Northern Michigan watercolorist Chuck Forman will have his works on display at the new artcenter Traverse City at 300 E. Front St. in January. Forman will also be volunteering his time to teach free classes in watercolor at the Little Red School House, to Rapid City School children in third to fifth grades on the second Saturday of each month from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. until June. In addition, his work may be seen on display at the Blue Heron Gallery in Elk Rapids; Adams Madams in Central Lake; the Gas Light Gallery in Petoskey; and by calling the Forman Studio at 231-322-6005.




 
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