Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Art · The artistic life of Chuck Forman
. . . .

The artistic life of Chuck Forman

Priscilla Miller - December 31st, 2007
Chuck Forman’s interest in art was initially sparked by a seventh grade art teacher. She got him interested in oil painting, and after that, he was “hooked.” While attending Fordson High School in Dearborn, Michigan, he took courses in engineering and drafting, yet he also managed to get in three hours a day of art classes.
He began his career as an artist at the age of 17. When visiting his grandparents’ farm in the Traverse City area, he saw an ad in the local paper for an apprentice artist. He decided to answer the ad, and of the 72 applicants, Chuck was one of two selected for the job.
“From then on, everything snowballed and one job led to another,” he says.
He met his wife Anita one summer, while working as a lifeguard. Shortly
after they married, he hired into a studio in Lansing, Michigan and also owned a couple of art studios. After vacationing in the Torch Lake/Traverse City area for years, Forman decided that even if he had to get a job pumping gas, he was
going to move to this area. Within a month of moving, job offers started coming in.
With his background in engineering, he became a commercial illustrator, and also spent time as an architectural delineator (one who looks at a set of blueprints and draws a dimensional picture of what the finished building will look like). He once modeled for a magazine ad, and he and Anita both had a small part in the classic Mackinac-Island-filmed movie Somewhere In Time.
Forman was a fisherman, too, which leads to another story of how his art has infused his life. Forman once caught a trophy size fish, but Anita insisted that that fish was not going to hang on a wall in their home. So Forman laid the fish on paper, and traced around it. they ate his catch for dinner, and then, using the tracing made earlier, he proceeded to paint a picture of his fish and hung it on the wall.
In 2000, Forman was commissioned by the Alden State Bank to do their calendar. His paintings of buildings in the quaint village of Alden and scenery of the surrounding Antrim County area proved to be so popular that he is now working on a calendar for 2009. He has never considered his 40-plus years of working with watercolors to be a job; he carries a pad of paper and a small watercolor set with him at all times, and often paints on-site.
An intriguing painting of a man lounging on a long park bench hangs over the mantle in his living room. Names of family members and friends appear to be carved into the wood on the bench. Occasionally, a friend will not see their name on the bench and will ask Chuck where it is.
He says, “I tell them, it must be on the other side of the bench!”
Now in his mid-seventies, Forman says, “It’s slow down time” - but by the looks of his studio, you would not believe it. Watercolors that Forman has painted line the walls in a profusion of color. His home sits on property along the Torch River, and he admits it’s probably a good thing that he cannot see the river from his studio, because if he could, he would never get anything done.
Northern Michigan watercolorist Chuck Forman will have his works on display at the new artcenter Traverse City at 300 E. Front St. in January. Forman will also be volunteering his time to teach free classes in watercolor at the Little Red School House, to Rapid City School children in third to fifth grades on the second Saturday of each month from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. until June. In addition, his work may be seen on display at the Blue Heron Gallery in Elk Rapids; Adams Madams in Central Lake; the Gas Light Gallery in Petoskey; and by calling the Forman Studio at 231-322-6005.




 
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