Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · All Aboard
. . . .

All Aboard

Robert Downes - January 14th, 2008
Clickety-clack, down the track. If you ever go to Vietnam, the Reunification Express is a good way to see the country, running some 900 miles between Hanoi and Saigon.
The tracks were bombed to smithereens during the war, but were rebuilt with help from the Russians in the late ’70s. India donated some hand-me-down trains, some of which are still on the rails. Today, the train is packed with both western tourists and Vietnamese, poking along at around 40 mph.

Here are some of
the sights you see along the way:
-- Vietnam is “the” place to go for Australians, a nation of 20 million fearless people who are madly in love with traveling the world, especially to cheap, Third World countries. It’s raining Aussies here.
-- And no wonder, because a three-star hotel will set you back $25. But the cheap thrills won’t last. Colossal hotels are being built along the coast, as Vietnam evolves into one of the top tourist destinations in the world. In the beach town of Nha Trang, there’s a new $500 million resort built by (I kid you not) Ukrainium uranium miners. It’s reached by an aerial gondola system that stretches for two miles over the bay.
-- Have you tried the roast frog with chili sauce at the little cafe across from the train station in Danang? They also offer steamed goat with ginger, BBQ pigeon, and the intriguing “Inside of Duck with Lemon Juice.” The Viets love their duck innards.
-- The charming old town of Hoi An has 300 silk shops and tailors who can whip up anything your heart desires for a fraction of the price back home. I had a blue cashmere pinstripe suit hand-tailored for $70. It was finished by the next day, including alterations. Thousands of tourists swarm the tailor shops here, getting fabulous bargains.
-- I befriend a woman named Nan, 42, who runs a snack cart outside my hotel. When she was a one-year-old baby, Nan’s mother and four members of her family were killed by American bombs.
Nan gets up at 5 a.m. to cook breakfast for her children, ages 5 and 16. Then she’s on the job from 6:30 in the morning until 10:30 at night, seven days a week, even in the cold, drizzling rain. I find her late at night, exhausted and sleeping by her cart on the street.
She lives with her father, who is 86 and insane from Alzheimers. Her’s is one of the many sad stories you hear everywhere in Asia.
But Nan has a brilliant smile that’s bright enough to rouse the dead. When I see her taking her baby girl to school the next morning on her motorbike, I realize that despite her hardship, there is still much love in her life.
-- The Vietnamese fishermen never carry lifejackets or safety equipment when they are out on the wild sea, because that of course, would bring bad luck. But they do take
one safety precaution:
they paint eyes on the prows of their boats so the watercraft will know where
they’re going.
-- Don’t put your hand in the basket cage holding a fighting cock. These scruffy, scrappy roosters are raised on steroids. Then, razor blades are fitted to their claws and they’re injected with adrenalin and tossed in the ring for a fight to the death. Cock-fighting is serious business here -- some of the boys bet the only thing they own -- their motorbikes.
-- Saigon (Ho Chi Minh City) is an exciting town with an ocean of motorbikes making an endless roar. You can shop til you drop here, or sit at a sidewalk cafe in plastic chairs designed for preschoolers, and watch the millions pass by. And there’s nothing like a hair-raising ride on the back of a motorbike taxi with half-flat tires, zig-zagging in and out of traffic and running red
lights to put the zest back in your life. A fun town.
-- The old Viet Cong stronghold of Cu Chi is a museum now, and you can crawl through some of the 35 miles of tunnels where 16,000 guerrillas hid out during the war. For $6 you can shoot five rounds of an AK-47. They used to let you shoot a chicken for your dinner, but animal rights activists put the kibosh on the fun.
Hmmm... where to next? Down south to the Equator, I suppose. Beastly hot down there, I hear. But fear not, because after a week in Malaysia, I’ll be headed to a place where it’s chillin’, with many familiar faces -- wrapping up a trip around the world... Xin cam on!
 
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