Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · The marriage tree
. . . .

The marriage tree

Jolynn Paige - January 21st, 2008
After 20 years of marriage, Ian and Nancy Ashken are still deeply in love - with life, with each other, with their family… and with the Leelanau Peninsula. Ian and Nancy are also dedicated environmentalists, in love with the idea of planting trees, and with the idea of what is known as the Marriage Tree Project.
Ian, a gentle, quiet soul who’s quick to smile and speaks with a charming British accent (he grew up in Norkfolk, England), explains. “We decided that what we wanted to do to commemorate our 20th anniversary was to place two trees – one for each of us – on our property.”
The couple recently purchased a 46-acre Omena Cherry farm, which they will preserve, continue to farm, and use for future summer gatherings and get-aways.
Last August, on a perfect summer afternoon, Ian and Nancy, with their children and several other friends and family members looking on, restated their marriage vows.

A PERSONAL MOMENT
Standing in a large circle in front of their farmhouse, the old red barn in the back ground, the sound of wind in the orchard branches around them, Nancy read a poem – e. e. cumming’s “i carry your heart with me.” She was tranquil, clear, and beautiful as she read.
Their twelve-year old son, Jonathon, read a passage from “The Giving Tree,” by Shel Silverstein. Emily, Ian and Nancy’s fourteen-year-old daughter, looked on, smiling, and hooking her arm around her mother’s arm. The entire family was radiating with the grace and peace of knowing that what they are doing is right and good.
David Milarch, president of Champion Tree Project International,
a non-profit group dedicated to pre-serving America’s tree heritage, spoke to the gathering about the importance of what Ian and Nancy are doing by planting trees.
“Trees give us hope for the future of a healthy environment because they are able to filter off all the garbage that is currently in our atmosphere. I commend you, Ian and Nancy, for helping the world grow stronger by planting these trees,” said Milarch.
Milarch is internationally recognized as a leader in the cloning and planting of champion trees. He’s been featured the past several years in a series of articles in the New York Times and the Washington Post.
After Milarch speaks, the family hops in their jeep, which has been decorated for the occasion, champagne flutes in hand, and heads for “the spot.”
Ian leads his bride to look on as the children and others start digging the hole where the two champion trees – Norway maples, cloned from a tree from Empire, Michigan - will grow for years to come. The honored couple then each pick up a shovel and start digging along with their children, joking, and happy as they do so.
Then, with the help of Milarch and his team, the trees are placed in their new homes. Ian holds up his glass and makes a toast.
“To Nancy,” he says.

DEDICATED MARRIAGE TREES
Ashken’s words and actions mean a lot: He is the chief financial officer, director, and vice-chairman of the board at Jarden Corporation, based in Rye, New York - a Fortune 500 company. When he speaks, people have a tendency to listen. He could choose to dedicate himself to just about any cause – but one of his favorites is the marriage tree project.
“A friend of ours, Terry Stanton, has long-time ties to Leelanau County. He’s very involved with reforesting efforts in Leelanau, and he also knows that in the 19th century, many homesteaders in the area planted trees when they got married. Many of those trees are still standing today. We just thought this was an incredible concept,” Ian said.
Nancy added, “Trees are so symbolic of strength, love, stability, tenderness, and giving. Ian and I thought this gift to each other to be the most beautiful and meaningful way we could express our love for each other and our commitment to the environment.”
Whatever the future holds for re-instituting the old tradition of planting marriage trees, Ian and Nancy can be proud that they have help lead the way to make a difference.
“It is our hope that other couples – from newlyweds to those commemorating anniversaries – may realize that reforestation is critical to our long time future.”

For more information go to
The Champion Tree Project at
www.championtrees.org.

 
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