Letters

Letters 08-25-14

Save America

I read your paper because it’s free and I enjoy the ads. But I struggle through the left wing tripe that fills every page, from political cartoons to the vitriolic pen of Mr. Tuttle. What a shame this beautiful area of the state has such an abundance of Socialist/democrats. Or perhaps the silent majority chooses to stay silent...

Doom, Yet a Cup Half Full

In the news we are told of the civil unrest at Ferguson, Mo; ISIS war radicals in Iraq and Syria; the great corporate tax heist at home. You name it. Trouble, trouble, everywhere. It seems to me the U.S. Congress is partially to blame...

Uncomfortable Questions

defending the positions of the Israelis vs Hamas are far too narrow. Even Mr. Tuttle seems to have failed in looking deeply into the divide. American media is not biased against Israel, nor or are they pro Palestine or Hamas...

The Evolution of Man Revisited

As the expectations of manhood evolve, so too do the rules of love. In Mr. Holmes’s statement [from “Our Therapist Will See Us Now” in last week’s issue] he narrows the key to a successful relationship to the basic need to have your wants and needs understood, and it is on this point I expand...

Home · Articles · News · Music · CCR Keeps on Choogling
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CCR Keeps on Choogling

Ross Boissoneau - March 24th, 2008
Originally a fun idea for a few private parties, Creedence Clearwater Revisited – the rhythm section of the original Creedence Clearwater Revival plus a couple of stand-ins for the missing Fogerty brothers – has become a regular working band since its inception in 1995. Heck, it’s even come complete with lawsuits of the type that helped scuttle the original band back in the ‘70s.
Stu Cook and Doug “Cosmo” Clifford were the men behind the bass and drums, respectively, for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame CCR when it was riding high on the charts behind such tunes as “Who’ll Stop the Rain,” “Lookin’ Out My Back Door,” and, yes, “Proud Mary.” But following Tom Fogerty’s departure in 1971, the band recorded its final album, 1972’s “Mardi Gras,” as a trio. Since then there have been a number of ugly lawsuits, with John Fogerty on one side and the band’s label, Fantasy, on the other, and the remaining members either in the middle or actually allied with the label against John.
The proceedings so angered Fogerty that he vowed never to perform his CCR songs again, which opened the door for Creedence Clearwater Revisited. With one-time Cars member Elliot Easton on lead guitar and John Tristao handling vocals, the band hit the road.
And the courtroom, too, once again facing Fogerty, who fought the band over its name. Eventually Clifford and Cook emerged victorious, the “Revisited” part of the name good enough to suit the courts.

CAN’T STOP THE MUSIC
But what about the music? That’s what led the twosome once again to the bandstand, and critics and audience alike agree the new band keeps the spirit of the old intact. Of course, it helped that Fogerty eschewed his own compositions until just a few years ago, but the new CCR band – now featuring guitarist Tal Morris and guitarist/keyboardist Steve Gunner – continues to tour relentlessly, reminding audiences of how great those hits from nearly 30 years ago really were.
“We never really had any intention of playing for the public,” says Cook. “But a friend wanted to promote a couple of concerts. We got talked into it, but didn’t know how it would go over.”
Audiences were so enthusiastic that the band finally decided to record a live document of their concerts. “Recollection” was recorded in western Canada, the result of numerous requests from Revisited fans to make a CD available. “It was generated by requests of the people who came to the shows,” Cook acknowledges. “Over and over they would ask, ‘Do you guys have a CD?’”
So what can the audience at the Odawa Casino expect? A generous helping of “Susie Q,” “Lodi,” “Down on the Corner” and any number of hits from the three years that CCR owned the top of the pop charts. That unique combination of swamp rock, blues, and boogie sounds just as invigorating now as it did then.
The show takes place Saturday, March 29 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $30 and $40. For more information, call 877-442-6464 or 439-6100, or log onto odawacasino.com.
 
 
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