Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · It‘s tax time
. . . .

It‘s tax time

Harley L. Sachs - April 7th, 2008
Because of some past foreign employment records, in addition to our annual U.S. federal income tax, I get tax forms for two very small foreign pensions.
Other than actually owing nothing abroad because the sums are so small, I do get an insight into tax filing practices in Sweden and Denmark. The tax forms of both countries consist of a single sheet of paper. No, they don’t say: 1) write down everything you earned, and, 2) send it. They do have high rates for those who earn enough to pay, but that’s another story.
Every year we go through the same routine with the IRS. Since I am the president of a struggling, miniscule corporation and have a losing business, I have more forms than the usual 1040EZ return to fill out. There are schedules A & B, C, D and E. There’s even a fiction the IRS has for a Foreign Tax Credit, a 1119, but by the time you go through all the arcane formulas it turns out the credit is zero anyway, so unless you are a puzzle freak it’s not worth the effort.
Even with a Ph.D. in language and literature and a work record of teaching technical writing (not accounting), the IRS instructions could as well be written in Sanskrit.
Convinced that the companies that are paid to prepare your taxes are in collusion with Congress and the IRS to make filing taxes so difficult that you have to provide them with lifetime employment, I refuse to hire them or buy the tax software. The result is that every year I make mistakes. Ah, well, it’s to be expected. The loyal civil servants at the Internal Revenue need me. I provide them with employment leading to hefty pensions. Like the old Smith Barney TV ad, “We make money the old fashioned way: we earn it,” I insist that the IRS earn their money by recalculating my returns.
These are not frivolous returns, mind you. I do my best, at least as well as the rest of the 50% of the American adult population which is functionally illiterate.
So last year when I filed for my refund, I miscalculated again. The IRS ran the numbers and decided that I had asked for too small a refund. They sent more money than I asked for. Then someone else calculated it again, and sent me another $22. I thought that after being reviewed twice I was done.
Ah, silly me. Now someone at the IRS has decided that I left something out and they want another $4,700; this on an income so small I’m too embarrassed to reveal it. It’s incredible. Seems I didn’t say how much the purchase price was of the stock my mother gave my wife about 30 years ago. All we know is that the sale netted us a capital gain of $11. That’s taxed, if I understand this correctly, at 15% as a long term capital gain. That’s $1.65, hardly worth the time it took the clerk to point this out.
Two other investments lost us a total of $653.27, which is more than my 2006 total income tax before this new bill. So how can I owe $4,700?
It’s beginning to smell like harassment.
I always invite the IRS to come and audit, bring a fishing rod, and plan to stay a few weeks. They won’t collect any more money than I already paid, which this year is nothing, but they will be paid handsomely for their time, be provided transportation and per diem, and if they buy a Michigan license may legally catch some fish — in season.
And of course if it is harassment, there’s always our congressman to write and the head of the IRS and the civil service commission suggesting that the nasty persons find other, more gainful employment. Blackwater pays a hefty salary for those mercenary security jobs in Iraq. Of course, in those jobs, instead of getting office paper cuts, you can get your head blown off. To each his own.
Some people do the New York Times crossword. I do my taxes, but never get them right. Ah, well.
Now, what’s your tax story?

Harley Sachs writes the Express ‘Technology‘ column.
 
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