Letters

Letters 07-28-14

Worry About Legals

I can’t figure out what perplexes me more, the misinformation everywhere in the media or those who believe it to be true. Take the Hobby Lobby case; as a company that is primarily owned by a religious family, they felt their First Amendment rights were infringed upon by the “Affordable” Care Act...

Stop Labeling and Enjoy

I have been struggling to find a simple way of understanding for myself the concepts of conservative, liberal, and moderation as it relates to our social interactions with each other...

Proposal One & The Public Good

Are you kidding me? Another corporate giveaway with loopholes for large corporations who rule us? Hasn’t our corrupt and worthless governor done enough to raise taxes, provide corporate welfare, unjustly tax pensions, and shut down elected officials with his emergency manager racket...

The Truth About Road Workers

Apparently Mr. Kachadurian did not catch on to the fact that the MDOT Employee Memorial in Clare is a tribute to highway workers who lost their lives building our transportation systems. It was paid for by current and former MDOT employees who likely knew some of these people personally...

Idiotic and Misguided

As a seasonal resident, I always look forward to reading your paper, if only because of the idiotic letters to the editor and off the wall columns...


Home · Articles · News · Letters · Letters 7/28/08
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Letters 7/28/08

- July 28th, 2008
Holy Childhood victims
Thank you for publishing the recent articles about the sexual abuse at Holy Childhood School. I’m a Catholic and a former employee of a Catholic church in our area. I did not know this abuse happened and the two articles disturbed me.
My heart goes out to the victims. I understand why some people would not want the building torn down. I might feel the same if I had not listened to a feature story reported on CBS news concerning a house where several teenagers were killed by an ex-boyfriend at a pizza party. The teenagers were loved and respected by all members of the the small town. Several residents, family and friends raised enough money to buy the house from the owner and tear it down. They were not trying to erase the memory of the kids. They were trying to erase the memory of the unspeakable evil that happened.
I can’t imagine the people from the Diocese of Gaylord would tear down this building just to sweep these memories “under the rug,” but there can be a fine line between sweeping and moving forward. Sometimes to move forward we must be willing to look back.
There is a wonderful Hawaiian word: “ho’o’pono’pono.“ It is kind of an encounter session where people stay in the same room sometimes for days until the evil surfaces and is rooted out. I pray for dialogue between the victims and members of the Catholic community.
I attended a presentation by an Indian in Sedona, Arizona. I say Indian because he does not like to be called Native American. He said the word Indian comes from a word that means “in God.” He said Native American comes from a German map-maker named Amerigo. He would rather be associated with the former. He said the song “one little, two little, three little Indians” was a song about how Indian boys were killed. After his presentation he said white people want to come to him after the presentation and apologize. He said it’s not necessary because the people listening to him didn’t do the wrong. What else can we do if we can’t apologize?
I read “Black Elk Speaks” many years ago. Black Elk said the most stupid thing he ever saw was when the white man built a little white house that God was in from 9 to 10 on Sunday morning. If only the people of my race were more willing to learn from the Indian people.
I hope I can start sleeping at night after getting this off my chest.

Irene Parker • Petoskey

(Part three of the series featuring memories of former students will run next week. - ed.)

Honoring George Bush
The Associated Press recently reported that San Francisco is naming their sewage treatment plant after President Bush. The idea is to commemorate the mess Bush made.
Hey East Bay Township, let’s start a nationwide trend here! Your septage treatment plant already spilled 150,000 gallons of partially treated waste when it collapsed, AND it’s way over budget. Hmmm... spewing poo... shoddy... millions over budget? Sounds like Bush to me! Let’s get this name change on the ballot! Who’s with me?

Scott Jones • Kalkaska

Soldiers & freedom
WOW is the only word that came to mind reading some responses to the poem about the soldier at the Blue Angels airshow (Letters 7/21).
One writer actually must be entertaining the thought that our current soldiers are not honorable, or similar, in that he only discussed soldiers who served in WWII. Obviously the writers must not think highly of those that have served, and DIED, in Vietnam, Grenada, Panama, Lebanon, and our current conflicts.
For those that forgot, the Constitution did NOT give us our freedoms. The minutemen of the Revolutionary War won our freedom. It was the musket and the brave fighters that gave us the freedom to create the Constitution. It is the soldier who protects those freedoms.
God bless the soldiers who have served and died protecting those freedoms. I will take a soldier over a poet, a lawyer, or a protestor any day. They are our best, they are our bravest, and they deserve EVERY recognition they get.
I never served, but respect all that have. We have far too many in our community who seemingly forget what our military gives us. “Culture of death” indeed. It is obvious the ‘60s mindset is still alive and kicking. The same culture that felt it necessary to spit at our soldiers after Vietnam and called them baby killers, acting like Genghis Khan. Well, there are those that respect and honor what the brave men and women of our military provide us, and all too often, we aren’t heard from. Go Army, Go Marines, Go Navy, Go Air Force, Go Coast Guard, and GO BLUE ANGELS!!!!

Chris Brown • Interlochen

Murder trial balloon
“Still time to impeach,” was a commendable article that appeared in the July 7th issue of the Express. It mentioned the valiant efforts of Congressmen Kucinich to initiate impeachment hearings in an effort to reestablish constitutional rule to this country.
While all efforts to hold this criminal administration are to be applauded, Vincent Bugliosi, the attorney who prosecuted Charles Manson, has just published a book intended as a guide for holding George W. Bush accountable by prosecuting him for murder -- “The Prosecution Of George W. Bush For Murder.”
Bugliosi, in his book, outlines how Bush, by initiating the Iraq War -- based on lies -- is culpable for the deaths of Iraqis and Americans killed from this disaster. Bugliosi, in numerous recent TV and radio interviews, stresses that there is no statute of limitation for the crime of murder, but more importantly, that Bush can be charged with murder by any state attorney general or prosecutor. The attorney general or a local prosecutor from any state can bring such charges against Bush provided that that state has suffered a causality in the Iraq War.
Estimates of Iraq casualties from our invasion and continued occupation vary now between 100,000 and one million. Thousands more are certain die before this debacle is finally over. Many will die as part of the four million desperately poor Iraqis refugees that have either fled abroad or have been internally displaced.
As of July 10, our own reported casualties are 4,116. George W. Bush bears responsibility for every one of these Iraqi and American deaths. He elected to begin this bloodshed based on fabricated falsehoods, which has created the anarchy of present-day Iraq.
At the Nuremberg trials, the primary crime of which the Nazis were accused and convicted was of course the crime against peace. A crime of planning and executing a war of aggression. And this is the central juridicial fact of the Nuremberg trials. George W. Bush, and much of his administration, have committed not merely impeachable offences, but war crimes.
Throughout Bush’s public career he has demonstrated an affection for a decidedly Old Testament view of justice. George W. Bush during his six years as governor of Texas presided over 152 executions, more than any other governor in the recent history of the United States. More than that, as the result of FOIA documents made available because of the embarrassing tenure of Alberto Gonzales as Attorney General, we know that Bush only occasionally even read the clemency requests made by death row prisoners in Texas.
There’s an old saying in Tennessee — I know it’s in Texas, probably in Tennessee, probably the whole country: “If you can’t do the time, don’t do the crime.” Buy a copy of “The Prosecution of George W. Bush For Murder” and mail it to our Michigan attorney general, Mike Cox. Ask for the prosecution of George W. Bush for murder.

Matt Malpass • East Jordan

Don‘t be apathetic
An open letter to 18 or older political “apathetics.” It’s not a partisan thing, it’s a participatory thing.
Once our biological clock hits the much-anticipated stroke of legality: 18, a new tone of social responsibility rings loud and clear. Many young adults find it nearly physically painful to partake in normal chores and other such obnoxious obligations, but there is one chore that rises above the others: participating in our democracy.
There are countless people I have talked with who say they simply “don’t care” about the election, that their vote doesn’t matter, and/or that they don’t care enough about any of the candidates to bother pulling a lever this November.
Our generation, no matter which political color we bleed, needs now more than ever to put the effort towards pulling that magic lever, and hopefully take some time to look over the issues and standpoints that lay just behind the polished soundbites and over-drawn scandals, before doing so.
We need to vote because it will basically determine almost everything in our future lives. You may not care about taxes and health care and even the environment at a young age, but someday, (hopefully) you will care. Peel yourself away from Facebook, and put a few minutes into learning about the candidates and the issues.
Voting may always seem like a chore to some, but I plead for enlightenment from just some of my contemporaries. Being politically active, as in being sexually active (perhaps something more young adults can relate to), requires responsibility, and many people my age turn away from responsibility like vampires from the sun. However, this is one chore that really matters. It’s as simple as that: vote, participate. Remember: your vote doesn’t matter if you don’t cast it.

Abby Hartig • Elk Rapids

Correction
Last week‘s story on Aphrodesia had the wrong time for their African dance/drum workshop: it begins at 7 p.m. (not 10 a.m. as listed in the article). They perform Friday, Aug. 1 at 1:30 p.m. at the Dunegrass.

 
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