Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Dave Dempsey‘s Great Lakes...
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Dave Dempsey‘s Great Lakes for sale

Rick Coates - August 18th, 2008
Dave Dempsey’s
Great Lakes for Sale
Great Lakes for Sale
The University of Michigan Press
128 pages
$22.95



As the final beach days wind down for 2008, consider taking Great Lakes For Sale From Whitecaps to Bottlecaps along with you for that final beach read.
Now at first glance this might seem a little bit of a heavy read for a leisurely afternoon at the beach. But there is really no better place to read this book than gazing over the miles of Lake Michigan.
First of all, author Dave Dempsey has taken one of the most challenging and often misunderstood issues in Michigan and the surrounding Great Lake states and put it all in layman terms. Dempsey has made this an easy read, not one full of scientific mumbo-jumbo, but rather he has written a 100-page essay (easy to read in an afternoon) that puts forward the issues at hand and offers solutions as well.
Dempsey is one of the leading advocates and experts for the future of the Great Lakes Water Basin. He is a senior policy advisor for the Michigan Environmental Council and well known for his writings on environmental issues in the Great Lakes region. He is author of Ruin and Recovery: Michigan’s Rise as a Conservation Leader and William G. Milliken: Michigan’s Passionate Moderate.
A REVIVAL
Despite recent challenges, Michigan may find itself soon in economic renaissance and the Great Lakes will probably be at the heart of the revival. But as fresh water supplies in other regions of the country become more limited, Dempsey poses several questions as to what is in the best interest of the Great Lakes in meeting the future water needs of the rest of the country.
What Dempsey does early for the reader is put in perspective the true mass of the Great Lakes. A surface view and even statistics point to this massive water system as being endless; but is it? For example, the Great Lakes hold 18% of the world’s available surface freshwater and 95% of the United States’ available surface freshwater. Throw in the fact that they comprise six quadrillion gallons of water, and if you spread it over the continental United States the lakes would create a 9.5-foot-deep swimming pool.
At the heart of the author’s thesis is the belief that the Great Lakes should not be put up for sale to the highest bidder. And that the potential commercialization of the Great Lakes to corporations would have long lasting negative impact, both environmentally and economically to those communities along the shoreline.
“It’s difficult to understate the importance of the Great Lakes water system -- economically, environmentally, or from a public-health perspective,” Dempsey writes. “The Great Lakes support a year-round sport fishery, they provide a route for commercial and recreational navigation, and they supply many communities with drinking water. Water means jobs and life in the Great Lakes region. And, while residents of this huge region revel in a seemingly limitless quantity of fresh water today, it’s likely that the future will see that same fresh water grow ever more scarce as well as become a source of contention between thirsty communities---and corporations -- further afield and those who live in this giant watershed.”

LONG-TERM THREAT
Dempsey drives home his point:
“It’s not simply a matter of how much water in the short term is removed; the long-term threat is control of water and the possibility that non-Great Lakes interests will assert ownership of the very substance of the Great Lakes.”
If Great Lakes For Sale has any shortcomings it would be that Dempsey does not address the waterways for alternative energy usage, either as a positive or a negative. His primary focus is the use of the Great Lakes water basin solely for bottle water usage and for the potential diverting to other regions. While these make strong arguments for protective measures, one has to wonder what sort of impact alternative energy initiatives would have as well.
One of the great attributes in Dempsey’s work is his willingness to accurately portray both sides of the issue. He presents the reader (who may be unaware of the commercial bottling company’s positions) with the arguments for the commercialization of the Great Lakes water basin.
Dempsey even recounts one surreal moment when he was debating the spokesperson for the water bottling industry on the Ron Jolly Show on WTCM-AM when they went to commercial break, only to have that commercial be for a new children’s book “The Day The Great Lakes Drained Away.”
Overall Dave Dempsey in a concise and easy to read format has made a compelling argument in support of his final chapter “Great Lakes Not For Sale.” This is a must read for anyone at all concerned about the future of the Great Lakes.

(In the cause of full disclosure, it should be noted that Express contributing editor Rick Coates was Dave Dempsey’s paperboy 35 years ago.)

The Fight for the Lakes:

Excerpt from Dave Dempsey’s Great Lakes for Sale: From Whitecaps to Bottlecaps:

“…The fight is not about hoarding or denying or even, in the end, keeping the Great Lakes as they are. Should some catastrophic need arise, few will stand in the way of an emergency transfusion of water to save lives far away. But under what terms, for whom, and for how long? The words ‘short-term humanitarian emergency’ may be the most important yet least well-defined of the many in the Great Lakes compact. They deserve more consideration and thought. And the Great Lakes will definitely not stay the same: as they always have, they will continue to transform themselves.
The fight is about something much bigger than that. It is about democracy and public interest. For when have the people, or their duly elected representatives at any level of government, after open debate in front of the citizenry and with full consciousness of their own actions, and with the assent of the same citizenry, authorized the taking of Great Lakes water for private profit by constitutional amendment, statute or rule?
They have not as of this writing. And until they do the waters of the Great Lakes belong to all the people and are held in trust by the governments charged with protecting their interests…”






 
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