Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Hangin‘ with The Horndogs
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Hangin‘ with The Horndogs

Ross Boissoneau - August 18th, 2008
“Hey, I know. Let’s get a band together next week for a party, and then in a few years make a CD.”
Well, that’s not exactly the way the Fabulous Horndogs story goes, but it’s close. In mid-December 13 years ago, a friend of saxophonist Newt Cole told Cole he’d booked him for a New Year’s Eve party. Only problem was, Newt had no band.
A few phone calls later, and Newt had gathered a bunch of musician friends at his house. They worked up some tunes, and next thing you know, there were the Fabulous Horndogs.
“We rehearsed a few tunes, and it sounded pretty good,” recalled Mike Marois. Marois had known Cole for years, and had been guitarist with one of his previous groups, Newt and the Salamanders, which gigged across the Midwest in the ‘70s. “Then Newt said, ‘Who can sing?’ Nobody said anything, and then I raised my hand and said I could sing a little, and Tim (keyboardist Tim Wire) said he could too.”
Thus was born the group that bills itself as Michigan’s premier dance and party band. There have been numerous personnel changes over the years, and now Marois, Wire, and Jim Murphy on drums are the only originals left. Cole left three years ago to move to Florida, and the band is rounded out by Jack Conners on bass, Hank Lawler on trombone, and Al Anderson on sax.
And yes, the group has finally made a CD. Dog Tracks is a set of 10 songs that cover a variety of blues styles. While in a live setting the band can stretch out to jazz, funk and rock, the decision to keep the disc bluesy was a deliberate one.
“We wanted to have a theme of sorts, rather than be all over the place,” said Marois. “Familiarity was a key. We didn’t want to stumble over the music in the studio.”
Not that the tunes sound the same. Marois said they were very careful to program it so there was some variety in keys and tempo within the style. The opening “For You My Love” is a midtempo tune originally by Jimmy Reed, with a few shout-outs to local landmarks. “Red Beans” is an uptempo romp written by Professor Longhair, featuring the horns and Wire. “Tim comes from that Professor Longhair-Dr. John New Orleans style,” said Marois.
Marois shines on the decidedly slower “Blues as Blues Can Get,” while the band picks it back up on “Funky Kid.” It all adds up to an enjoyable, danceable set of blues.
Marois says that danceability is the key to all the Fabulous Horndogs’ music. “It’s stuff that moves your feet,” he said. “If it doesn’t make you move, if people can’t dance to it, then we shouldn’t be doing it.”
The Horndogs perform at various events around the region, from private parties to corporate events to the occasional nightclub show. Every Wednesday the rhythm section performs as the Stray Dogs at the Cedar Tavern.
Dog Tracks is available through the band’s website or on CD Baby, or for downloading at Digstation.com. For more information, go to the band’s website at fabuloushorndogs.com.




 
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