Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Hangin‘ with The Horndogs
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Hangin‘ with The Horndogs

Ross Boissoneau - August 18th, 2008
“Hey, I know. Let’s get a band together next week for a party, and then in a few years make a CD.”
Well, that’s not exactly the way the Fabulous Horndogs story goes, but it’s close. In mid-December 13 years ago, a friend of saxophonist Newt Cole told Cole he’d booked him for a New Year’s Eve party. Only problem was, Newt had no band.
A few phone calls later, and Newt had gathered a bunch of musician friends at his house. They worked up some tunes, and next thing you know, there were the Fabulous Horndogs.
“We rehearsed a few tunes, and it sounded pretty good,” recalled Mike Marois. Marois had known Cole for years, and had been guitarist with one of his previous groups, Newt and the Salamanders, which gigged across the Midwest in the ‘70s. “Then Newt said, ‘Who can sing?’ Nobody said anything, and then I raised my hand and said I could sing a little, and Tim (keyboardist Tim Wire) said he could too.”
Thus was born the group that bills itself as Michigan’s premier dance and party band. There have been numerous personnel changes over the years, and now Marois, Wire, and Jim Murphy on drums are the only originals left. Cole left three years ago to move to Florida, and the band is rounded out by Jack Conners on bass, Hank Lawler on trombone, and Al Anderson on sax.
And yes, the group has finally made a CD. Dog Tracks is a set of 10 songs that cover a variety of blues styles. While in a live setting the band can stretch out to jazz, funk and rock, the decision to keep the disc bluesy was a deliberate one.
“We wanted to have a theme of sorts, rather than be all over the place,” said Marois. “Familiarity was a key. We didn’t want to stumble over the music in the studio.”
Not that the tunes sound the same. Marois said they were very careful to program it so there was some variety in keys and tempo within the style. The opening “For You My Love” is a midtempo tune originally by Jimmy Reed, with a few shout-outs to local landmarks. “Red Beans” is an uptempo romp written by Professor Longhair, featuring the horns and Wire. “Tim comes from that Professor Longhair-Dr. John New Orleans style,” said Marois.
Marois shines on the decidedly slower “Blues as Blues Can Get,” while the band picks it back up on “Funky Kid.” It all adds up to an enjoyable, danceable set of blues.
Marois says that danceability is the key to all the Fabulous Horndogs’ music. “It’s stuff that moves your feet,” he said. “If it doesn’t make you move, if people can’t dance to it, then we shouldn’t be doing it.”
The Horndogs perform at various events around the region, from private parties to corporate events to the occasional nightclub show. Every Wednesday the rhythm section performs as the Stray Dogs at the Cedar Tavern.
Dog Tracks is available through the band’s website or on CD Baby, or for downloading at Digstation.com. For more information, go to the band’s website at fabuloushorndogs.com.

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