Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Interlochen Guitar Festival
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Interlochen Guitar Festival

Ross Boissoneau - August 18th, 2008
Expect the unexpected at this year’s three-day Guitar Festival at Interlochen Center for the
Arts. Artists as varied as Lionel Loueke from Benin in Africa, Pierre Bensusan from France, and Daryl Stuermer of the U.S. will be sharing the bill with regional and local favorites like Jabo Bihlman, Dan Kelchak, and festival organizer John Wunsch.
Stylistically, the music will vary from acoustic folk to gentle jazz to hard-rocking blues. Don’t forget fusion, world music and classical strains as well.
So in short, it will be exactly like years past: A potpourri of styles, all showcasing fluid fretwork. Wunsch says that has been the goal from the start.
“The first year, we started out with fingerstyle, classical, acoustic, jazz and flamenco. Last year we added pick style, with blues and rock, with slide and electric guitar,” he said.
This year features those same styles with the addition of jazz fusion, courtesy of Stuermer. Stuermer is probably most familiar as the touring guitarist with Genesis and Phil Collins. He also has an extensive background in jazz fusion, both through his association with electric violinist Jean-Luc Ponty and his own solo efforts, including “Go!,” from 2006.
Also new to the festival is the unique combination of world and jazz music of Loueke, whose solo album on Blue Note includes guest spots by jazz
titans Wayne Shorter and Herbie
Hancock. He’s also a member of
Hancock’s band. Not only does Loueke play guitar, he sings in an altogether unique manner that is completely integrated into his music.
In addition to the concert settings, the classes that are an integral part of the festival include a focus on the musician as a whole person. That means classes like Tai Chi for guitarists and classes dealing with performance anxiety, as well as more beginner and intermediate classes.
“It’s holistic, on the health of the musician and what we do for the community,” said Wunsch. “It’s more than just what we do as a musician. It relates to wellness and the joy of music and musicianship.”
The festival runs Aug. 21-23, with a program on Thursday including classical virtuoso Ana Vidovic, Andy McKee on harp guitar, and acoustic master Pierre Bensusan. Friday’s show features such guitarists as Bihlman, Wunsch, and headliner Loueke. Saturday’s show finds Stuermer headlining with guests Claudia Schmidt and Luke Winslow King.
Wunsch says the format features different performers and groupings in short “setlets” of about six minutes each. “It’s music, music, music, intermission, then more music” he said. “We don’t want to have large breaks between the tunes, so the stage will be preset with the performers ready to go.”

Tickets for the 8 p.m. shows in Corson Auditorium are $25. For information, log onto Interlochen’s website at interlochen.org or call the box office at 800-681-5920.
 
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