Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - November 29th, 2007
John Fogerty – Revival – Fantasy
Since John Fogerty disbanded Creedence Clearwater Revival, he’s abdicated his role as spinner of Americana to the likes of John Mellencamp and Bruce Springsteen (see below). But while it took multiple lawsuits and acrimony between him and his former bandmates, Fogerty has seemingly recaptured the magic of those long–ago days. True, he’s had high points since then, principally “Centerfield” from 1985. But he’s never sounded so much like a new and improved version of CCR. He sharpens his pencil and zaps the administration for the war in Iraq, the abandonment of New Orleans, and his view of its corruption and ineffectiveness on “Long Dark Night,” while on “Summer of Love” he lets the guitars do the talking. And his singing really is better than ever, with clearer enunciation and less quaver and twang. Who would have thought you really could go home again?
 

Bruce Springsteen – Magic – Columbia
Critics are calling this Springsteen’s best album in years. The only question is, the best album since when? One could compare this to Born in the USA in terms of its quality and not be embarrassed, or to Darkness on the Edge of Town for its cinematic feel, and not be far off there either. “Radio Nowhere” opens the disc with an anthemic singalong that brings to mind the America Springsteen misses. There’s a maturity here, both lyrically and musically, that the Boss couldn’t claim back then. While his spooky harmonica brings back memories of dustbowl days, the string section argues for an orchestral oeuvre previously unheard, though perhaps hinted at on “Meeting Across the River” on “Born to Run.” It all adds up to an instant classic, one whose moods and majesty measure up to the soaring guitars and wordplay. Magic indeed.
 

Maynard Ferguson – The One and Only Maynard Ferguson – Maynard Ferguson Trust
While critics sometimes panned the late trumpeter’s bravura style, fans – and fellow trumpeters – stood in awe of Ferguson’s audacious chops. The One and Only... is as good a going–away present as he could have left us, with both the power and the too–often–overlooked taste, musical generosity and command of a master musician in full view. Ferguson often capitalized on jazz versions of popular tunes, from “Hey Jude” to his hit version of “Gonna Fly Now” from the Rocky movies. Here, he tips his hat to Bill Withers with “Ain’t No Sunshine.” Ferguson also was a master of the ballad, and his flugelhorn playing, especially in his later years, was a thing of beauty. On “Vita Bella,” he amply demonstrates his vitality and the sheer beauty of his tone. The other standards and originals on this disc convey a feeling of beauty, of bravado, warmth and joy. If he had to go, Maynard certainly went out on one of his highest notes.

 
Will Downing – After Tonight – Peak
Downing is one of those middle–of–the–road R&B singers whose music is appealing enough but lacks the personality or the hits to make him stand out from the crowd. The album has its share of highlights, such as the opening “Will’s Groove” and the delightful “Lover’s Melody,” a much more sprightly track than the name might suggest. The wah–wah guitars and swaying vocals are accompanied by Roy Ayers on vibes, giving the tune a slightly exotic twist. But the energy continues to flag on the overlong title track which follows, finding Downing endlessly repeating the title phrase with no change in the backing, presumably to create emphasis or tension. But instead the repetition tends to have a stultifying effect. There are enough of the high points to make you wish Downing had edited the overlong tracks and deleted the less interesting ones altogether in favor of more exciting tunes.
 
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