Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

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4Play

Ross Boissoneau - November 29th, 2007
John Fogerty – Revival – Fantasy
Since John Fogerty disbanded Creedence Clearwater Revival, he’s abdicated his role as spinner of Americana to the likes of John Mellencamp and Bruce Springsteen (see below). But while it took multiple lawsuits and acrimony between him and his former bandmates, Fogerty has seemingly recaptured the magic of those long–ago days. True, he’s had high points since then, principally “Centerfield” from 1985. But he’s never sounded so much like a new and improved version of CCR. He sharpens his pencil and zaps the administration for the war in Iraq, the abandonment of New Orleans, and his view of its corruption and ineffectiveness on “Long Dark Night,” while on “Summer of Love” he lets the guitars do the talking. And his singing really is better than ever, with clearer enunciation and less quaver and twang. Who would have thought you really could go home again?
 

Bruce Springsteen – Magic – Columbia
Critics are calling this Springsteen’s best album in years. The only question is, the best album since when? One could compare this to Born in the USA in terms of its quality and not be embarrassed, or to Darkness on the Edge of Town for its cinematic feel, and not be far off there either. “Radio Nowhere” opens the disc with an anthemic singalong that brings to mind the America Springsteen misses. There’s a maturity here, both lyrically and musically, that the Boss couldn’t claim back then. While his spooky harmonica brings back memories of dustbowl days, the string section argues for an orchestral oeuvre previously unheard, though perhaps hinted at on “Meeting Across the River” on “Born to Run.” It all adds up to an instant classic, one whose moods and majesty measure up to the soaring guitars and wordplay. Magic indeed.
 

Maynard Ferguson – The One and Only Maynard Ferguson – Maynard Ferguson Trust
While critics sometimes panned the late trumpeter’s bravura style, fans – and fellow trumpeters – stood in awe of Ferguson’s audacious chops. The One and Only... is as good a going–away present as he could have left us, with both the power and the too–often–overlooked taste, musical generosity and command of a master musician in full view. Ferguson often capitalized on jazz versions of popular tunes, from “Hey Jude” to his hit version of “Gonna Fly Now” from the Rocky movies. Here, he tips his hat to Bill Withers with “Ain’t No Sunshine.” Ferguson also was a master of the ballad, and his flugelhorn playing, especially in his later years, was a thing of beauty. On “Vita Bella,” he amply demonstrates his vitality and the sheer beauty of his tone. The other standards and originals on this disc convey a feeling of beauty, of bravado, warmth and joy. If he had to go, Maynard certainly went out on one of his highest notes.

 
Will Downing – After Tonight – Peak
Downing is one of those middle–of–the–road R&B singers whose music is appealing enough but lacks the personality or the hits to make him stand out from the crowd. The album has its share of highlights, such as the opening “Will’s Groove” and the delightful “Lover’s Melody,” a much more sprightly track than the name might suggest. The wah–wah guitars and swaying vocals are accompanied by Roy Ayers on vibes, giving the tune a slightly exotic twist. But the energy continues to flag on the overlong title track which follows, finding Downing endlessly repeating the title phrase with no change in the backing, presumably to create emphasis or tension. But instead the repetition tends to have a stultifying effect. There are enough of the high points to make you wish Downing had edited the overlong tracks and deleted the less interesting ones altogether in favor of more exciting tunes.
 
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