Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Region Watch · The search for affordable...
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The search for affordable housing

Robert Downes - February 18th, 2008
Can you afford to live in the town where you work? Or, are you forced to live far out of town where housing is more affordable?
That‘s one of the issues to be addressed at an upcoming conference on “Creating Housing Choices“ in northwest Michigan.
“Affordable housing is a regional issue,“ says Sarah Lucas, coordinator of Community Housing Choices, a program of the Northwest Michigan Council of Governments. “It‘s not a single topic -- it touches on our local economy, transportation, and land-use issues.“
For instance, from an economic standpoint, Lucas notes that a concern of new businesses interested in relocating to Northern Michigan is whether there will be affordable housing for their employees.
“And in terms of transportation or land-use, when there‘s a lack of affordable housing in town, that contributes to sprawl and more traffic on local roads,“ she adds.
In Northern Michigan, more than 60% of the population is considered to be in the “low income“ range in regard to what it takes to purchase an affordable home.
“A household falls in the low-income range if it earns less than 80% of the area‘s median income,“ Lucas says.
Median income refers to the halfway point between the lowest and highest incomes in a given area.
In Grand Traverse County, the median income is $62,000 for a family of four. “So that means that if your family earns $49,000 or less, you are a low-income household.“
At a $49,000 income range, an “affordable“ home would be $125,000 --difficult to find within the city limits of Traverse City or Petoskey.
By 2010, it‘s estimated that “more than 44,000 families in our five-county region will be earning less than 80% of the median income, or less than $47,000 for a family of four in Grand Traverse County.“
The disparity between income and housing prices is driving Traverse City workers out of town to rural communities in Fife Lake, Grawn, Interlochen and Kingsley. In Petoskey, workers may drive in from Alanson or Boyne City.
Even city employees may not make enough to live where they work, notes Matt McCauley, associate director of Community Housing Choices.
He notes that Traverse City recently advertised a firefighter‘s position that paid $38,000 per year. “Using the median income formula, that means that a city employee can‘t afford to live in the city in which they serve,“ he says. “There‘s a bit of irony in that.“
McCauley make clear that low income housing isn‘t the same as government-subsidized housing for the indigent poor, which has been a turn-off in many communities across the country. “It‘s not a handout or an advocacy group for those in poverty -- we‘re just trying to provide a minimal level of support for the area‘s workforce, and that can be teachers, firefighters and other members of the community.“
Lucas is one such example: she qualified as a low-income earner and moved into a specially-intended affordable housing unit at the Midtown Center development in Traverse City five years ago.
At the conference, realtors, municipalities and members of the Grand Vision project, among others, plan to discuss strategies for easing the housing crunch in Northern Michigan, including:
• downsizing lot sizes in rural townships, where minimum lot requirements may be as much as 10 acres per home;
• downsizing home sizes;
• encouraging ‘mixed-use‘ communities of residential, office and retail spaces;
• allowing ‘granny flats‘ and other creative housing options.
Speaking will be Julie Bornstein, former director of the California Department of Housing and Community Development and president of the nonprofit group Campaign for Affordable Housing. She will explain “why safe, decent, affordable housing is essential in creating healthy economies and vibrant communities.“

The Creating Housing Choices Conference will be held Thursday, March 13 at the NMC-Hagerty Center in Traverse City, with all welcome. Registration forms and the conference agenda are available online at:
www.communityhousingchoices.org
 
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