Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

Home · Articles · News · Art · The Bellstone revisits Gallery 544
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The Bellstone revisits Gallery 544

Robert Downes - September 15th, 2008
Marcia Bellinger will be bringing back some familiar faces for the Sept. 19 Art Walk in downtown Traverse City. Dan Oberschulte, former owner of Gallery 544, and many of the artists he used to feature there, will be the focus of Bellinger’s show at her Belstone Gallery.
“The Art Walk is a wonderful event, with all the downtown art galleries,” Bellinger said. “I do a show every Artwalk. Most are up two weeks to a month. This display will run through the end of October.”
In addition to Oberschulte, the “Gallery 544 Revisited” show will feature Mary Fuscaldo, Joe De Luca, Jerry Gates, Dorothy Grow, Dan Heron, Joe Stearns, Angela Saxon, Flora Stuck, Nancy Hoffman, Billie Hoxie and Julie Pearson.
Gallery 544 was located at 544 Eighth St., and Oberschulte displayed work by many local artists, focusing primarily on those who will be featured in this show. The idea for this show came about from casual conversations among the artists and Bellinger.
“The Gallery 544 people are all friends of mine,” Bellinger said. “We said, wouldn’t it be fun to do something? So I thought, I’ve got the place. Why not?”

She’s got the place indeed. Located at 321 E. Front St., Belstone Gallery was founded in 1986 by Bellinger, a retired English teacher. The first thing you notice when you walk in the door is the play of light and color. With windows on three sides, including transom windows extending all the way to the ceiling, the sunshine is reflected from the colorful glassware on display. The light literally sparkles from everywhere.
That’s just the way Bellinger intended it. “Lighting is very important,” she said. “And a lot of color. I thought gallery walls had to be white, but then I used some color.”
That’s certainly the case. In addition to the sparkling colors of the art work, the walls vary in hue from a rich chocolate to yellow to chartreuse. But rather than looking haphazard, the different colors only add to the appeal of the gallery. All of it reflects Bellinger’s carefree approach to art.
“I buy what I like. I like glass, so there’s a lot of glass. I’ve stayed pretty open to just about anything.”
And when she decides it’s time to change the color scheme, she’s the one on the ladder doing the painting. “I paint the walls to complement the art,” she said. “Here I can do anything. At home I’ve got a husband.”
Art Walk patrons pay $5 for an inscribed wine goblet, which they can take with them from gallery to gallery, where the various venues may offer refreshments. The money goes toward downtown art projects.
For more information, go to
belstonegallery.com or call 946-0610.

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