Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Books · There‘s Nothing Amateurish...
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There‘s Nothing Amateurish About The Amateur Marriage

Nancy Sundstrom - May 20th, 2004
As a longtime fan of the gifted author Anne Tyler, I had very much been looking forward to reading her latest and 16th novel, “The Amateur Marriage,“ when it came out earlier this winter.  Just as the book was released, my own 25-year marriage came spiraling apart, and try as I might, I just couldn‘t seem to immerse myself in Tyler‘s tale of two people who love each other deeply but seem to be unable to live together – it simply cut too close to the bone.
Some months later, it became apparent that there was no hope for salvaging my marriage, and Tyler‘s book still remained on my nightstand.  I took the plunge, and in doing so,  found an incredible amount of wisdom, insight and humanity in Tyler‘s perceptive story that shed new light on the way the heart and soul can be ravaged by marriage and divorce.  In that way, reading it was quite therapeutic, while again confirming why Tyler is one of the most respected “popular“ writers of her generation, and earned her the Pulitzer Prize in 1988 for her modern classic, “Breathing Lessons.“  “The Amateur Marriage“ is also a decidedly ambitious work, with a number of unexpected surprises, as well, all of which gives it range, power and an undeniably compelling quality, even when it is at its most heartbreaking and penetrating.
In the book‘s first chapter, “Common Knowledge,“  Tyler introduces us to Michael and Pauline, two very different people who first meet in the days prior to WWII, and will spend the next 30 years of their life married to each other, until Michael decides he can no longer stay with her:

“Anyone in the neighborhood could tell you how Michael and Pauline first met.
It happened on a Monday afternoon early in December of 1941. St. Cassian was its usual poky self that day—a street of narrow East Baltimore row houses, carefully kept little homes intermingled with shops no bigger than small parlors. The Golka twins, identically kerchiefed, compared cake rouges through the window of Sweda‘s Drugs. Mrs. Pozniak stepped out of the hardware store with a tiny brown paper bag that jingled. Mr. Kostka‘s Model-B Ford puttered past, followed by a stranger‘s sleekly swishing Chrysler Airstream and then by Ernie Moskowicz on the butcher‘s battered delivery bike.
In Anton‘s Grocery—a dim, cram-packed cubbyhole with an L-shaped wooden counter and shelves that reached the low ceiling—Michael‘s mother wrapped two tins of peas for Mrs. Brunek. She tied them up tightly and handed them over without a smile, without a “Come back soon“ or a “Nice to see you.“ (Mrs. Anton had had a hard life.) One of Mrs. Brunek‘s boys—Carl? Paul? Peter? they all looked so much alike—pressed his nose to the glass of the penny-candy display. A floorboard creaked near the cereals, but that was just the bones of the elderly building settling deeper into the ground.
Michael was shelving Woodbury‘s soap bars behind the longer, left-hand section of the counter. He was twenty at the time, a tall young man in ill-fitting clothes, his hair very black and cut too short, his face a shade too thin, with that dark kind of whiskers that always showed no matter how often he shaved. He was stacking the soap in a pyramid, a base of five topped by four, topped by three. .. although his mother had announced, more than once, that she preferred a more compact, less creative arrangement.
Then, tinkle, tinkle! and wham! and what seemed at first glance a torrent of young women exploded through the door. They brought a gust of cold air with them and the smell of auto exhaust. “Help us!“ Wanda Bryk shrilled. Her best friend, Katie Vilna, had her arm around an unfamiliar girl in a red coat, and another girl pressed a handkerchief to the red-coated girl‘s right temple. “She‘s been hurt! She needs first aid!“ Wanda cried.
Michael stopped his shelving. Mrs. Brunek clapped a hand to her cheek, and Carl or Paul or Peter drew in a whistle of a breath. But Mrs. Anton did not so much as blink. “Why bring her here?“ she asked. “Take her to the drugstore.“
“The drugstore‘s closed,“ Katie told her.
“It says so on the door. Mr. Sweda‘s joined the Coast Guard.“
“He‘s done what?“
The girl in the red coat was very pretty, despite the trickle of blood running past one ear. She was taller than the two neighborhood girls but slender, more slightly built, with a leafy cap of dark-blond hair and an upper lip that rose in two little points so sharp they might have been drawn with a pen. Michael came out from behind the counter to take a closer look at her. “What happened?“ he asked her—only her, gazing at her intently.
“Get her a Band-Aid! Get iodine!“ Wanda Bryk commanded. She had gone through grade school with Michael. She seemed to feel she could boss him around.
The girl said, “I jumped off a streetcar.“
Her voice was low and husky, a shock after Wanda‘s thin violin notes. Her eyes were the purple-blue color of pansies. Michael swallowed.“

There is poetic justice in the fact that that Michael and Pauline, while destined to e together, are basically disastrously mismatched. She is impulsive, impractical, big-hearted and believes that love can triumph over anything.  He is reserved, cautious, judgmental and almost defiant in his self-righteousness. In the heat of WWII fever, they wed, but the truth is that they never should have.  For this reason, they remain “amateurs“ at the art of marriage, even as they carve out a life together, raise children and segue from one decade to another.
Because they are so different, their bitter and unrelenting quarrels build over time with a stunning sort of regularity and tedium to which many will be able to relate.  Pauline believes as she always has, that their rifts can be mended, but to Michael they become unbearable, forcing him to believe that divorce is not only his only option, but will bring him liberation and redemption.  By the time they reach the 1970‘s, diversions, such as caring for their little grandson, Pagan, whom they rescue from Haight-Ashbury when their goes into rehab, cannot steer them from the inevitable destruction of their marriage.  
At the end of the book, when readers will most likely expect that they know the outcome of the story, Tyler lobs in a hand grenade of a plot twist that is fitting poetic justice, especially since the complexity and unpredictability of relationships is such a major theme throughout.  In lesser hands, this sort of device might simply detonate and explode, but in Tyler‘s, it serves to illustrate a deeper point about human survival.  This is a poignant and unforgettable book that dares to ask if we all aren‘t amateurs somehow when it comes to dealing with the forces that keep people together or tear them apart.  It  resonates with a universality that makes this a must-read not only for those who have dealt with or are coping with the end of a marriage, but for those who simply appreciate finely crafted examinations of human connection.
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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