Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · There Should Be Hell To...
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There Should Be Hell To Pay

Robert Downes - October 6th, 2008
Back in college economics 101, we learned that the Great Depression could never happen again because our wise legislators had enacted many iron-clad regulations and safeguards to ensure that the stock market would never again reach such a state of peril.
But, like the chaos theory taught by the mathematician in Jurassic Park, you can never say never -- the destruction of those market regulations over the years has let the T-Rex out of its cage.
Thus, the rampage on Wall Street last week and terror plastered across the media. Let’s hope we don’t all get eaten alive by this thing.
Now, millions of Americans are of the opinion that the gamblers on Wall Street should bail themselves out. Why should we contribute a nickel to help these pirates? They can sink or swim.
But unfortunately, we are chained to the pirates. In some pirate navies, if you killed another sailor, your ankle was tied to his corpse and it was shoved overboard.
So, if you oppose the bailout, consider that you’re likely to go under too.
Why are we chained? Because as the pirates have pointed out, they are the dispensers of credit. And when they run dry, they don’t have money to lend. They want us to pay off $700 billion in their bad debt.
In a sense, they‘ve got us by the throat: without access to credit, the business you work for may not be able to get its annual short-term loan to keep operations going (ie: paychecks), or buy inventory for the coming year. And you might not receive a student loan; or get the loan you need to buy a used truck for that snow-plowing business you’re planning to start, now that you’re out of a job...
So, that’s the boat we’re in today.
How did we get here? It started with the “Reagan Revolution” in the 1980s, otherwise known as the “Decade of Greed.” That’s when deregulation fever swept our government (lubricated by the oil of cash from lobbyists). It was felt at the time that those bothersome old regulations from the 1930s were getting in the way of business; we put our faith in a “free market” ideology of economist Milton Friedman, believing that the wisdom of the captains of industry would steer us to safe harbors, with a hefty cargo of earnings onboard to boot.
Regulations on banking, the stock market, and other financial institutions were ignored, deep-sixed, or went unenforced by the Reagan administration, with that trend continued by Clinton and the Bushes.
This fever reached its height in 1999, when Senator Phil Gramm (R-Texas), the chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, authored an act which repealed regulations in the financial services industry. Gramm and his supporters said the regulations were no longer necessary because we‘d grown so much smarter and more sophisticated.
This is the guy, by the way, who said Americans were a “nation of whiners” back in July when he was serving as John McCain’s chief financial advisor.
Gramm’s legislation opened a Pandora’s Box of “wild, casino-type operations” to gamble with the money that you and I have placed in the trust of the banks and Wall Street, with today’s sick results.
There’s not enough space here to go into the pros and cons of the bailout. You could wallpaper Wall Street with all of the opinions generated on this subject over the past two weeks.
But conservative
financial wizard Ben Stein (who made the casino analogy above) likens the bailout to throwing the Constitution out of the window, and possibly ranking as “the most dangerous attack on the law in my lifetime.” Stein says that raiding the U.S. Treasury and the taxpayers to bail out Wall Street gamblers takes America down the same communist/socialist road blazed by Vladimir Lenin or Fidel Castro.
Many people on the Left feel the same way, while those in the middle seem inclined to bail out the mess and move on.
One thing that everyone agrees on, however, is that there should be hell to pay. In China, there would be firing squads for those involved.
Here, at the least, we need to ensure the end of CEOs making more than 344 times as much as the workers in their factories. No more tax breaks for companies that outsource American jobs overseas. No more “golden parachutes” of tens of millions of dollars for CEOs who run their companies into the ground and then bail out. We need to revive the regulations that keep us safe from Wall Street gamblers and make them pay us back for any bailout.
For once, we’re all in the same sinking boat: Republicans, Democrats, rich, poor, young, old: it’s our necks at stake here -- our jobs, our savings, our retirement. We need to lock arms and make the pirates of Wall Street pay for what they’ve done.
 
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