Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Books · The English Major
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The English Major

Glen Young - November 17th, 2008
Native Michigander Jim Harrison is a man of large appetites and larger passions.
The writer -- whose new novel “The English Major,” a Kerouac-like road novel with Whitman-like sensibilities, is garnering widespread praise -- is also noted for his outsized ego. And though ego can insulate against public pressures, it is little help against personal anguish.
So when 70 year-old Harrison finished last year’s “Returning To Earth,” compelled in part by the death of his older brother John, he needed a reprieve. “After I finished ‘Returning to Earth,’ which is a tale of considerable melancholy, I was trying to figure out how to levitate my spirits,” he says over the phone from his home outside Livingston, Montana, inhaling audibly on an American Spirit cigarette.
“I began (writing the ‘English Major’) four days after finishing ‘Returning to Earth.’ I usually wait months.”
He admits the idea came to him more than 40 years ago. “I thought about it first in the ‘60s, when I was at Stony Brook (in New York). It wasn’t very pleasant,” he says about his brief teaching stint. “I was terribly homesick.”
The new book, set early and late in the Boyne City area, combines levity with loss and uncertainty with unwillingness. When his wife comes back to a class reunion picnic with grass stains on her knees, 60-year-old Cliff discovers his companion of nearly 40 years, Vivian, is having an affair with an old high school flame. Distraught and disbelieving, Cliff is further crushed when he thinks he’s run over his best dog Lola with his aging Taurus.
“Marriages can become quite disheveled due to overexposure,” Harrison says of Cliff and Vivian’s deterioration. “Cliff couldn’t survive the growing boredom between the two of them.”
Lola didn’t succumb to the Taurus, but Cliff largely succumbs to his wife’s affair. Vivian, lately selling real estate near their comfortable farm, has sold out and Cliff finds all he wants to do is light out.
A former English teacher turned cherry farmer, Cliff is prototypical Harrison, his agrarian attitudes tempered with literary aspirations and refined tastes in all things sensuous, from fine food to fine women.
“Before I can write anything, I have to pin it down geographically,” Harrison says of his approach to his work.
“I’m always wondering, in the aging process, what would happen to a guy who just sort of went flat,” he says of his new book. “It’s almost the flip side of ‘Farmer,’” his 1976 novel about school teacher Joseph who finds his emotions and libido pulled in competing directions.
Propelled by the affair and Vivian’s announcement that she’s sold the farm they’ve shared since her father died, “while fishing perch up in the Les Cheneaux Islands near Cedarville,” Cliff determines not just to light out, but to journey with a purpose. Inspired by a childhood puzzle of the United States, he decides the states need new names and the state birds should be renamed as well. “Each of our United States must have an Indian name for a tribe that originally inhabited the area,” he realizes in his moment of epiphany.
With a loose itinerary, Cliff points his Taurus west and angles toward Wisconsin, Minnesota, Nebraska, Montana, and points further west. His adventures begin almost immediately, when he rediscovers Marybelle, a former student and “off brand peach.”
In Minnesota, Cliff picks up the married Marybelle, and continues. Her insatiable appetites feed his libido, but her incessant ramblings hurt his psyche.
“Both Vivian and Marybelle are right on the money for a certain kind of woman,” the author says knowingly.
With Marybelle in tow, Cliff heads further west, into Montana for some trout fishing, then to California to visit his movie producer son Robert. Flush from his film projects, Robert attempts to reconcile Cliff to his new position. From Robert’s comfortable but spare San Francisco condo, Cliff next heads back to Montana to fish and meet his Michigan veterinarian buddy Ad.
Eventually free of Marybelle and buoyed by newfound purpose in his renaming project, Cliff understands how, “Ten years of teaching and twenty five years of farming had beaten my youthful idealism senseless, but now I had begun to feel it burble up again.”
“Think of the idealism we inhabit as English majors,” Harrison says. “When we meet the world and the culture we have now, Emerson isn’t the answer. There ought to be a product warning label on books.”
For Harrison, the book is about “the horror of answered prayers.”
Cliff, buffeted by doubt and bolstered by doing, winds his way back to Michigan and to his grandfather’s farm, coming as close as he can come to his old cherry orchards and his old life.
Dividing his time between Montana and Arizona, Harrison has been slowed by Type 2 diabetes, and though he admits his “behavioral problems are (still) smoking and drinking,” he has taken his doctors’ advice against a book tour to promote “The English Major.”
His health will not however keep him from more writing. Harrison recently completed “the best novella I’ve ever written,” and there are plans for more nonfiction as well, including “Pilgrimages,” detailing some 35 writers who have influenced him over the years, including “everyone from Willa Cather to Henry James” as well French novelists like Camus.
“For 15 years I’ve been making it as a novelist,” he says of his success. “I see no reason to stop.”

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