Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Books · Rubber City Rampage
. . . .

Rubber City Rampage

Robert Downes - December 1st, 2008
Punk Rock and Trailer Parks
By Derf - SLG Publishing
152 pages. $15.95


Who knew? Akron, Ohio was at the epicenter of the punk rock movement at the dawn of the ‘80s, churning out some of the greatest bands of the era.
That’s one of the revelations in Punk Rock and Trailer Parks, a new graphic novel by Derf, the artist whose comic, The City has run in the Northern Express since the early ‘90s.
If anyone would know, it’s Derf Backderf, a resident of Cleveland whose work appears in alternative newspapers across the nation. Derf’s noir viewpoint is almost gothic in his approach to trolling the gritty, banal bottomlands of life in the Midwest -- an Ohio frozen in a New Dark Age and locked in medieval attitudes.
Nowhere is that exploration more evident than in his high school haunts of Akron, a town known as Rubber City for its tire factories, which also happens to be stalled by a Rustbelt recession as the book opens.
Yet there’s one bright spot for the trailer park kids doomed to life in Akron: by some odd confluence of fate, rage and despair, the town gave rise to a dynamic punk rock scene, starting in 1979, with acts such as Devo, Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders and other raw & ragged groups swept up by punk’s power. A lively club scene took root in a ruined bank, bringing in such iconic acts as The Ramones and The Clash. The punk rock eruption prompted Melody Maker magazine to dub Rubber City as “the new Liverpool.”

NERB POWER
Derf tells Akron’s story through the eyes of Otto, a high school marching band nerd who discovers his calling as a punk rock singer. Otto lives in his crazy uncle’s trailer park on the edge of town. His nerdiness extends to recording a symphony of his own farts on a cassette deck and quoting from the wisdom of the elves and wizards of J.R.R. Tolkien. He lusts after a high school hottie, Teri Workman, whose only attribute seems to be her outsize mammaries.
Otto makes for a dreary protagonist as the reader endures a series of his high school hijinx and his transformation from outcast to a local rock hero. But the payoff for the reader is the trip down punk history lane as Otto attends a succession of concerts at Akron’s rock club, The Bank. He has encounters with The Ramones, Joe Strummer of The Clash, and the pneumatic Wendy O. Williams of The Plasmatics -- among the most dazzling characters of punk’s hey-day.
Derf also explores the subtext of rock politics. While epic bands such as The Clash perform their masterpiece album, “London Calling” for a few hundred kids at The Bank, slick, corporate rock stars such as Journey pack a local stadium with 17,000 fans. Rock music critic Lester Bangs makes a pilgrimage to Akron to witness the scene, commiserating on the triumph of style over substance. “These are mutant times,” Bangs says. “We need people making passionate music out of noise and sonic scraps! Instead, we get Steve Perry crooning banal flapdoodle to throngs of mesmerized sheep!”

UNMATCHED STYLIST
And when Otto finally gets to strut his stuff for Teri as the frontman for his band at The Bank, she doesn’t even know he appeared on stage. “Well... I don’t really like this punk stuff much...” she says. “I like real rock-n-roll. Frampton.. Journey...”
And so it goes. The other star of the show is Derf’s artistry. As a stylist, few graphic artists match his ability to capture the “no future” slouch and despair of the underclass. This is his second and longest graphic novel (the first was a saga of his high school classmate, Jeffrey Dahmer, the notorious gay cannibal of the ‘90s). Derf was also the recipient of a prestigious Robert F. Kennedy Award in 2006 and his work is featured in Best American Cartoons: 2008 (Houghton-Miiflin).
Punk Rock and Trailer Parks is a historical document of the recent past, unearthing a time and place that may have already fled the memories of the boomers and Gen-X kids who made that scene. Readers will be thrilled to find a soundtrack of more than 40 artists that can be downloaded from iTunes to be read along with the book. There’s also a fatal aftermath of 10 players who made the punk scene in Akron and didn’t live to tell the tale -- Oh, the wages of rock stardom...
Will Otto get the girl? Will Akron rise to the heights of a music mecca? Will the geniuses of punk find their reward with commercial love and acceptance? Find out in Punk Rock and Trailer Parks, available at bookstores and www.derfcity.com

 
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