Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · A soldier‘s tale
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A soldier‘s tale

Robert Downes - May 26th, 2008
Not long ago, I met an old soldier who had made the crossing in the D-Day invasion of June 6, 1944 -- that was 64 years ago. Still as spry as spring at the age of 84, he came over to say hello as I was walking my bike through a local farm market. I’m sorry to say I didn’t catch his name.
“I wish I could ride a bike,” he said. “You save all that money riding a bike. But my joints are all roughed up and I lost my hearing when a cannon went off next to my head at Omaha Beach. You know what you get from the government when you lose your hearing? Not much. And these hearing aids cost $6,000.”
So often, we turn our backs on older people and their stories. But the old soldier was so full of life, I couldn’t resist hearing more.
“So you were in the D-Day invasion crossing the English Channel?” I asked. “I heard that was quite a fight.”
“Oh yes, I was with an outfit of men all thrown together from different units, riding these halftracks with machine guns that we used to spray the hedgerows with because the Germans would be hiding behind them. The turrets could swivel all the way around so you could fire those guns in any direction.”
“Were you scared during the landing? They say it was pretty rough.”
“Oh sure,” he nodded. “The Germans were up on the hills above the beach in pillboxes with little slits in them,” he said, drawing a narrow box with his hands. “And they sprayed our men who were landing with their machine guns, cutting them down. And we also had barbed wire and all sorts of obstacles to get through just to get at them.
“I’m lucky to be alive,” he added, “but I went on to Paris and then up through Belgium and Holland, all the way to Berlin.”
“Were you in the Battle of the Bulge?” I asked, thinking of the biggest, bloodiest battle of the war, in which 19,000 Americans lost their lives in the bitter cold and deep snow of Belgium and northern
Germany.
“I was on the outskirts.”
“Sounds like you did alright, just staying alive.”
“Yes, although I got wounded in the war and got the Purple Heart,” he said. “A few years ago, I took my medal down to the coin store and asked if it was gold because it’s so shiny. And they said, no, it’s fool’s gold. Can you believe that? The government didn’t even give us medals of gold, and back then, gold was cheaper than it is now. They gave me a tin medal, and here I lost my hearing and the government won’t do much of anything.”
But he recounted all this in such a cheery manner that I could only imagine that fate or God or his guardian angel had given him the greatest gift of all for surviving World War II -- that of life and memory.
The unfortunate plight of veterans the world over is that after the fighting is done and the political leaders and their war profiteer pals have made off with the spoils of the national treasury, the veterans who fought the war tend to be forgotten.
In our own country, this goes back to Shay’s Rebellion in 1786 when hundreds of farmers rebelled against the new American republic. Many were unpaid veterans of the American Revolution, whose anger was fueled by heavy taxes and debt. The farmers were short on cash because they relied on a barter system and were often forced to sell their land to speculators.
Veterans have had their grievances with the government (and its apathetic attitude) ever since. In our own lifetime, Vietnam veterans suffering from the effects of Agent Orange and post-traumatic stress syndrome have reported feeling abandoned, as have veterans of the Gulf War in ’90-’91 who suffered from the neurological disorder of Gulf War
Syndrome. Those cases were notorious because initially, our government’s reponse to injured vets was that it was “all in their heads.”
The War in Iraq has seen 29,395 wounded as of last week, along with the 4,058 killed. Many of the wounded are in far graver condition than vets who earned Purple Hearts in the past for the simple reason that today, battlefield surgeons and trauma teams are able to save horribly injured soldiers who would have died of their wounds in prior wars. That‘s both the good and bad news about medical science today: it can keep people alive, but at what personal cost?
On Memorial Day, we honor those who died for their country. Shouldn’t we also honor the wounded who left a part of themselves on the battlefield?
 
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