Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · A Circle of Comfort: Yurt...
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A Circle of Comfort: Yurt Living Offers an Affordable Alternative Close to Nature

Danielle Horvath - February 20th, 2003
It‘s like stepping into a circle of warmth in the middle of winter. Large windows bring in bright light, even on a gray day. The steel support beam dIrects your eye up to the skylight dome in the middle, and then down the wood trim that completes the circle to the wood floor. Open, airy and inviting, the yurt home of Karen Coussens stands out in a field overlooking an 80-acre valley in Benzie County.
“I wanted a home that was as close to being outside as I could get, and this is it,“ Karen explained. A retired career preparation specialist, she discovered the property while visiting friends in Cedar and quickly fell in love with the area.
“I knew I wanted to build a new house, -- one that would fit the property -- where I could see out of windows everywhere. I laughed the first time I heard of a yurt, but then I started doing some checking and found Pacific Yurts in Oregon. The more I learned about them -- energy efficient, open, designed to bring fresh air in, could be built anywhere -- the more I was sure that‘s what I wanted.“
The traditional portable home of the shepherds of inner Asia, the yurt is the equivalent of the American tipi. It is ingeniously constructed with light poles for a roof, sapling lattice for walls and a thick felt exterior skin. With the rising cost of house building in the early 1970s, many young people turned to unique, inexpensive, do-it-yourself construction methods. Pacific Yurts has been manufacturing a modern yurt for 21 years and was awarded the U.S. Senate Productivity Award for excellence in manufacturing and an international Achievement Award for design excellence.
Considered a “soft“ structure, the yurt reacts more readily to climatic conditions than do “rigid“ structures, so the site must be considered for wind patterns, over-head tree limbs, water runoff, etc. For yurts set up for extended periods, a deck is recommended.
It took a little longer to complete the project because the local contractor and excavator had never built a yurt before. At first, the excavators didn‘t know how they would do a round cement basement.
“There was a lot of cell phone calls between Roger Pierce -- the contractor -- and the yurt company,“ Coussens says. “But Roger was great; once they got the idea, it all came together.“
Yurts come pre-fabricated in a kit, ready to assemble. Coussen‘s design included a sma}ler- yurt for the bedroom, with the two connected by a closet and front entryway.
Coussens has made it through her first year in her yurt and so far she loves it. “It‘s so easy to clean, a little Pledge on a rag, a couple of turns and I‘m done. There‘s no outside maintenance. In the spring, I take off the plexiglas on the inside of the windows and let the air in through the screens and lattice. If it rains, I go out and lower the flaps. The canvas is guaranteed for twenty years; the roof for 25. By then, I won‘t really care!“ she says with a laugh.
Coussens heats with a pellet-burning stove and has electric heat for back up. She estimates the cost of her yurt is about the same as a traditional 2,000 square foot house with a basement. “There was more ttime and labor, and the windows had to be insulated and drywall had to be installed on the inside walls for it to pass the county building codes.“
For more information, check out www.yurts.com.


 
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