Letters

Letters 02-01-2016

Real Contamination In 1968, Chicago (its Mayor Richard Daley in particular) felt menaced by anti-war protesters (Abbie Hoffman in particular) threatening to put the hallucinogenic LSD into Chicago’s water supply. In reaction to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., we reacted vigorously to a perceived threat of chemical or biological terrorist attacks on our water supply. A religious cult contaminating a city water tank with salmonella in Oregon, sickening about 700, was the only such attack in our country until now. The water supply of Flint, Mich., was attacked and contaminated, not by terrorists or protesters, but by our own government...

Why The Muslim Debate? I was passing through your fine town last week and picked up a couple copies of Northern Express. There I noted a discourse concerning the Muslim situation in Dearborn. It is interesting to note that I see similar conversations in newspapers and blogs throughout the country and, in fact, throughout the world...

Kachadurian Has It All Wrong Thank you for continuing to publish Thomas Kachadurian’s bigoted editorials. If not for this publication, I wouldn’t know that such people lived in my sweet northern Michigan...

Over The Line I felt Sarah Palin crossed the line when she indicated our president did not care about those like her son who came home wounded. No one challenges her on these remarks; to me it is shameful...

Flints’ Man-made Disaster Governor Snyder’s Financial Emergency Manager Law has created a State of Emergency in Flint. In 2011, newly elected Governor Snyder signed Public Act 4, giving him the freedom to take over any city government his office found financially bankrupt, with power to override any decision of elected city officials. This law showed his primary motive — money before people. In November 2012, the People of Michigan voted down his Financial Emergency Manager Law, as they resented losing control of their cities. In December 2012, he showed his contempt for the people’s vote and signed a revised version, one that did not give power back to the people...

Defending the AR15 And Gun Rights I was amazed to read David Downer’s recent letter. He admits he is a gun owner but he expresses his ignorance of what an “assault rifle” really is, and thereby spreads the antigun position that an AR15 is an assault rifle...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Blissfest plans new recreation...
. . . .

Blissfest plans new recreation center

Robert Downes - January 5th, 2009
A new Blissfest Arts Recreation Center is in the works at the music organization’s 120-acre site outside Cross Village.
Blissfest Director Jim Gillespie says the new center will offer a range of attractions in a quiet, natural setting.
“The center will place special emphasis on traditional music, dance and crafts education,” Gillespie said in a release. “In addition, general recreation activities such as camping, hiking, nature walks and gardening will be available. Guests and members will be encouraged to participate in developing and maintaining the facility’s gardens, orchards and trails.”
The project is contingent on approval of township and county planning commissions that review special use permit zoning requests and allow for public input.
Several years ago, the Blissfest attempted a similar expansion and was met with opposition from a number of neighbors in Readmond Township. Since that time, the music organization has worked hard to prove itself a good neighbor by tightening up regulations and oversight at Northern Michigan’s biggest music festival, which is held the second weekend in July.

QUIETER ROLE
On that score, the Blissfest intends for its new Arts Recreation Center to be a low-key operation, compared to the folk festival. In addition to its nature experiences, the center will be used for “occasional retreats, school programs, workshops and small summer concerts and dances, in addition to general recreational camping use by Blissfest members, guests and the general public.”
Music, of course, will provide a common ground.
“We are following our Bliss,” says Jim Gillespie. “Music is the universal language and a quality of life essential. To be able to explore the diverse music and dance traditions of American and other cultures at a small retreat center in Northern Michigan is a legacy project we aspire to.”
Gillespie helped found the organization 29 years ago when the first Blissfest Folk Festival was held in a farmers field near the crossroads of Bliss in 1981. “We were musical gypsies at first, moving the festival site each year to our farmer friend’s current fallow field. The festival eventually migrated to its current location in 1988 and the property was purchased in 1995. “Now we are really setting down permanent roots with a center where folk and roots music and dance can grow and flourish in our area.”

CAMPING TOO
The Arts Recreation Center will also offer 35 campsites with 10 of the campsites as walk-in only. The rustic campground will cater to tents and small trailers, with a few sites will be constructed to accommodate disabled individuals. There are also plans to build 10 small cabins that will demonstrate historic and innovative designs. Plans are to include renewable energy components, such as wind generators and solar panels for power sources. The existing historic farmhouse will be remodeled and be used as a guesthouse. The maximum design capacity of the facility accommodations will be 200 people. In addition, a multiple-use solar pavilion building is being planned, along with a camp information center that will house a souvenir and snack shop for guests.
“We are very excited to present this project to the community,” says Bob Humphrey, Blissfest board president. “Blissfest is a primary source for cultural heritage programming and folk and roots music education. To be able to do that on the land that we have such a historical connection with and respect for will be a great advancement for the organization and the community.“

-- Robert Downes contributed to this story
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close