Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Something fishy in the woods
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Something fishy in the woods

Glen Young - January 5th, 2009
in the Woods

Death Roe: A Woods Cop Mystery
By Joe Heywood
Lyons Press

This time around, Grady Service might really be in the soup. Chasing suspicions that a long-time government contractor might be illegally mixing tainted salmon eggs in its caviar production, Service has alienated colleagues, irritated friends, and infuriated alleged foreign mobsters.
Service, the laconic Department of Natural Resources conservation officer protagonist of author Joe Heywood’s Woods Cop mystery series, is back in the sixth installment, “Death Roe.” Based on a case Heywood says he isn’t at liberty to further identify, “Death Roe” finds Service investigating allegations that a long-time, highly-paid, state contractor is illegally mixing salmon roe contaminated with the carcinogen Mirex with safe eggs, then selling the mixture to unsuspecting Caribbean cruise ship lines.
“When I write these books,” Heywood says, “I think it’s useful to use situations that will inform.” He says his books are regularly “based largely on real cases. Virtually nothing is invented in these books.”
Still recovering from the murders of his girlfriend and aspiring conservation officer Maridly Nantz, and his son Walter, Service again uses work both as focus and as distraction.
Navigating ever-changing territory, Service finds himself reluctantly coordinating with agents from IRS, FDA, FBI, as well as fisheries personnel from New York. He is working further outside the boundaries of his DNR confines than ever before.

The case centers on fish processor Piscova, suspected of combining contaminated Lake Ontario roe with safe Lake Michigan eggs, all at the behest of the Ukrainian mafia. When Service begins to unravel the case, he finds threads that might lead all the way to the top levels of the DNR, a development both absorbing and offensive.
Relegated to a rental house in Saranac, in mid Michigan, Service is sharing duties with a younger officer, the attractive Dani Denninger, who had known Nantz and has a propensity for sleeping in the buff. Uncomfortable working with others, Service nonetheless “likes (Denninger’s) aggressiveness.” But while she “was easy to work with…he noticed she constantly looked to him for direction.”
Denninger and Service are aided in their efforts by Zhenya Leukonovich, a Russian-born forensic accountant who also has an eye for Service, along with an eerie habit of referring to herself in the third person.
With salmon season quickly winding down in Michigan, Service and Denninger have to work swiftly to build their case. In typical Service fashion, the introverted woods cop logs long miles on the road, veering from the U.P.’s Huron Mountains, where a former “Caviar Queen” is dying of cancer, likely caused by Mirex, to Lansing’s governmental buildings, and even Anchorage, Alaska, where he meets with a former Piscova employee with a grudge.
Author Heywood has again reconstituted his winning Woods Cop formula in “Death Roe.” In addition to the new case, with unlikely villains and wild twists, Service’s personal tragedies and small triumphs outline a fully formed character.

Returning for encore performances too are Service’s fellow CO Candi McCants, Walter’s pregnant girlfriend Karlyanne, as well as Service’s longtime buddy Luticious Treebone, and even Michigan’s doppelganger governor Lorelei Timms. The combination of recognizable characters with new turns creates a believable tension, long a hallmark of Heywood’s fiction.
The author, who lives in Portage, still lights out for the U.P. regularly, as often as not riding along with real life woods cops. He believes because COs do much the same work regardless of location, he could set his tales anywhere. Using the U.P., however, means, “The setting then becomes a character in the story.” The U.P., he believes, “has a different kind of natural beauty than we have down here.”
While Heywood worries that he might have started his series with Service too old, he has already finished the next installment. Tentatively titled “Hard Green Violets,” the new story starts out with a tale nearly a century old, then fast forwards to the present.
Heywood takes the same approach to all of his writing. He writes in longhand one day, then transcribes his work the next day on computer. When he’s comfortable with the material, he submits it to his agent and waits for news of a contract with the publisher.
The formula works and Heywood says he’s already written nearly 10,000 words on what will become his eighth Woods Cop mystery. “It’s based on something I discovered about how two state agencies interact.” He’s keeping further details a secret, at least that is until Grady Service takes over the case.

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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