Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Something fishy in the woods
. . . .

Something fishy in the woods

Glen Young - January 5th, 2009
SOMETHING FISHY
in the Woods

Death Roe: A Woods Cop Mystery
By Joe Heywood
Lyons Press
$24.95

This time around, Grady Service might really be in the soup. Chasing suspicions that a long-time government contractor might be illegally mixing tainted salmon eggs in its caviar production, Service has alienated colleagues, irritated friends, and infuriated alleged foreign mobsters.
Service, the laconic Department of Natural Resources conservation officer protagonist of author Joe Heywood’s Woods Cop mystery series, is back in the sixth installment, “Death Roe.” Based on a case Heywood says he isn’t at liberty to further identify, “Death Roe” finds Service investigating allegations that a long-time, highly-paid, state contractor is illegally mixing salmon roe contaminated with the carcinogen Mirex with safe eggs, then selling the mixture to unsuspecting Caribbean cruise ship lines.
“When I write these books,” Heywood says, “I think it’s useful to use situations that will inform.” He says his books are regularly “based largely on real cases. Virtually nothing is invented in these books.”
Still recovering from the murders of his girlfriend and aspiring conservation officer Maridly Nantz, and his son Walter, Service again uses work both as focus and as distraction.
Navigating ever-changing territory, Service finds himself reluctantly coordinating with agents from IRS, FDA, FBI, as well as fisheries personnel from New York. He is working further outside the boundaries of his DNR confines than ever before.

UKRAINIAN MAFIA
The case centers on fish processor Piscova, suspected of combining contaminated Lake Ontario roe with safe Lake Michigan eggs, all at the behest of the Ukrainian mafia. When Service begins to unravel the case, he finds threads that might lead all the way to the top levels of the DNR, a development both absorbing and offensive.
Relegated to a rental house in Saranac, in mid Michigan, Service is sharing duties with a younger officer, the attractive Dani Denninger, who had known Nantz and has a propensity for sleeping in the buff. Uncomfortable working with others, Service nonetheless “likes (Denninger’s) aggressiveness.” But while she “was easy to work with…he noticed she constantly looked to him for direction.”
Denninger and Service are aided in their efforts by Zhenya Leukonovich, a Russian-born forensic accountant who also has an eye for Service, along with an eerie habit of referring to herself in the third person.
With salmon season quickly winding down in Michigan, Service and Denninger have to work swiftly to build their case. In typical Service fashion, the introverted woods cop logs long miles on the road, veering from the U.P.’s Huron Mountains, where a former “Caviar Queen” is dying of cancer, likely caused by Mirex, to Lansing’s governmental buildings, and even Anchorage, Alaska, where he meets with a former Piscova employee with a grudge.
Author Heywood has again reconstituted his winning Woods Cop formula in “Death Roe.” In addition to the new case, with unlikely villains and wild twists, Service’s personal tragedies and small triumphs outline a fully formed character.

BACK FOR MORE
Returning for encore performances too are Service’s fellow CO Candi McCants, Walter’s pregnant girlfriend Karlyanne, as well as Service’s longtime buddy Luticious Treebone, and even Michigan’s doppelganger governor Lorelei Timms. The combination of recognizable characters with new turns creates a believable tension, long a hallmark of Heywood’s fiction.
The author, who lives in Portage, still lights out for the U.P. regularly, as often as not riding along with real life woods cops. He believes because COs do much the same work regardless of location, he could set his tales anywhere. Using the U.P., however, means, “The setting then becomes a character in the story.” The U.P., he believes, “has a different kind of natural beauty than we have down here.”
While Heywood worries that he might have started his series with Service too old, he has already finished the next installment. Tentatively titled “Hard Green Violets,” the new story starts out with a tale nearly a century old, then fast forwards to the present.
Heywood takes the same approach to all of his writing. He writes in longhand one day, then transcribes his work the next day on computer. When he’s comfortable with the material, he submits it to his agent and waits for news of a contract with the publisher.
The formula works and Heywood says he’s already written nearly 10,000 words on what will become his eighth Woods Cop mystery. “It’s based on something I discovered about how two state agencies interact.” He’s keeping further details a secret, at least that is until Grady Service takes over the case.


 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close