Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Tiempo Libre
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Tiempo Libre

Ross Boissoneau - January 19th, 2009
People think there are certain things that just don’t go together. Plaids and stripes, for instance. Or maybe chocolate and lemonade. How about Latin music and orchestral music?
Two out of three maybe. Tiempo Libre intends to prove to the audience at Corson Auditorium on Saturday, Jan. 24 that the group’s fiery Latin music can indeed coexist with symphonic stylings. One of the hottest Latin groups today, Tiempo Libre will be teaming up with the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra to perform Venezuelan composer Ricardo Lorenz’s “Rumba Sinfnica.” And if that’s not enough, the Grammy-nominated group will also play a set of their signature brand of salsa known as timba.
“We were classical music students, but it’s different playing timba than classical,” said Jorge Gomez, the group’s pianist, just before Tiempo Libre began its tour.
But whatever the form, Gomez says the crowd at Interlochen had better be ready for a good time. “I’m looking forward to seeing the crowd dancing,” he said. “They’re going to sing with us and dance with us. It’s like a Cuban party.
“They’d better be prepared.”

BEST OF BOTH WORLDS
For his part, Lorenz says the piece he composed in collaboration with Gomez will bring out the best in both the orchestra and in Tiempo Libre. “They are disparate musics,” he said from his office at Michigan State University, where he is a professor of music composition. “That’s the point – to have two different genres that don’t connect (come together).”
The inspiration for “Rumba Sinfnica” came when Lorenz saw a performance by the band. He suggested they collaborate on a piece, and Tiempo Libre agreed. While he had previously composed pieces that mixed genres in a similar fashion, such as his “Pataruco: Concerto for Venezuelan Maracas and Orchestra” or “Puente Trans-Arábico for Middle Eastern percussion and String Quartet,” this was the first time he composed a piece specifically for a working band.
“This is unique because of the people involved,” Lorenz said. “From the onset I collaborated with Jorge. If it was going to work, I knew Tiempo Libre had to think of it as their own.
“Another group could perform it, but it needs a group that comes in (together) to be so tight. If they needed to rehearse to play together, it would be a disaster.”
No such worries with this group. The seven members of Tiempo Libre learned the ropes by studying classical music by day in Cuba, then, despite orders to the contrary, picking up the nuances of their homeland’s rhythms outside the classroom. Upon immigrating to Florida, the members came back together as Tiempo Libre to celebrate their heritage while taking advantage of the skills they’d learned in the conservatories.

UPLIFTING RESULTS
Those classical lessons come in handy on the group’s latest recording as well, O’Reilly Street, with famed classical flutist Sir James Galway. Galway and four members of Tiempo Libre – Gomez, bassist Tebelio Fonte, drummer Hilario Bell, and percussionist Leandro González – collaborated on selections from Claude Bolling’s “Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano” and traditional pieces, along with a Gomez original and Bach’s “Contradanza.”
The results are engaging and uplifting, with the Cuban musicians bringing new life to Bolling’s music and bringing out the best in Galway. Or maybe it’s the other way around. No matter, the end result is a delight.
Gomez promises the same for the show at Interlochen.
“Music is energy. It’s everything about Cuban culture,” he said.

Tickets for the 7:30 p.m. show are $21 for adults, $18 for seniors and $9 for students. Call the box office at 276-7800 or go online to tickets.interlochen.org.

 
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