Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


Home · Articles · News · Music · Brett Dennen
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Brett Dennen

Robert Downes - February 16th, 2009
These are high times for singer-songwriter Brett Dennen: He just wrapped up a performance on the Conan O’Brien Show; he’s been signed to perform at the 2009 Bonnaroo festival in Tennessee; and he’s backing up The Fray on a tour of Britain this April.
With a buzz building in Dennen’s direction, it’s a good time to catch the acoustic rocker on his way up. Locally, music fans will have their chance when Brett Dennen and his band perform with The Little Ones this Thursday, Feb 19 at 8 p.m. at the City Opera House in Traverse City.
The 29-year-old considers himself a late-bloomer; his first big break was opening for John Mayer, who caught his gig in California in 2006 and asked him to join his tour.
Raised in northern California, Dennen was home-schooled by his parents. He worked as a camp counselor in Yosemite National Park in his early 20s. Part of the job involved introducing juvenile offenders to the great outdoors as part of an Outward Bound-style program. “I pushed them to the limit,” he said in a Rolling Stone interview, adding that he taught his crew how to purify water, establish shelters in the wild, and other woodcraft.
Musically, you can place Dennen in the roots-rock bag with the likes of Dave Matthews and Jack Johnson. His vocals have been compared to the two (minus the frog in Matthews voice) and he tends toward sunny songs about nature, peace and love. His bio touts his “earthy tenor” as being “somewhere between Neil Young and Amy Winehouse,” and perhaps there’s a dash of Jeff Buckley in there too.
Dennen is big on social causes. His website (BrettDennen.net) offers info on various non-profit organizations, a “Hope for the Homeless”
CD, and a rather ill-defined “Mosaic Project,” which crafts “children’s songs for peace and a better world.”
“Hope for the Homeless” is a 12-song CD that draws inspiration from the music of Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell and worldbeat artists.
A Porterhouse Productions show, this Thursday’s perfor-mance at the City Opera House runs $15 for general admission seating. Other upcoming shows at the Opera House include comedians Drew Hastings on Friday, March 6, and Louis CD on Thursday, April 16, with Ani DiFranco performing Monday, April 27.
 
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