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Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Kitchen Magic/ Sara Dakoske
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Kitchen Magic/ Sara Dakoske

Robert Downes - February 23rd, 2009
Kitchen Magic/ Sara Dakoske
Robert Downes 2/23/09


Sara Dakoske looks like she’s having the time of her life at her job, and why not? Her day is spent designing imaginative, creative kitchens and baths for new residents at Building 50, the massive renovation project at the Grand Traverse Commons in Traverse City.
“I thought it would be awesome to get involved with the Building 50 development and it’s been very interesting so far,” she says. “Designing a kitchen or a bath here involves keeping the historical feel of the building, and also working with exposed conduit and duct work, the old windows and the dimensions of each space.”
For those not in the know, Building 50 is the former Northern Michigan Asylum just south of Munson Medical Center. The building has been wildly popular with condo purchasers, but offers significant challenges, considering that its small spaces and wide-open dormitory areas were once the home of mental patients. There are 14-foot ceilings throughout the residential areas, which occupy the second, third and attic floors of the building, as well as the aforementioned exposed ductwork and conduit.
But Dakoske, 27, finds the challenges of working with Building 50 to be one of the most interesting aspects of her job. So far, she’s completed roughly 30 kitchen and bath projects at Building 50, working with three other designers as part of the Shoreline Kitchen & Bath team.
A 2000 graduate of Traverse City West High School, Dakoske studied interior design at Michigan State University. Upon graduating in 2004, she landed a job in Rochester, working with a specialty lumber and building center. One of her specialties there was working with fine cabinetry.
“With the economy down in the Detroit area, I decided to move back up north,” she recalls. “I had known about Building 50 since the time I was a child, and it was great to get involved in its renovation.”
Her job involves working with numerous contractors, all of whom deal with the engineering concerns of working with a 124-year-old building with walls ranging from 12-18 inches thick.
Then there are the spaces themselves: Dakoske has created mini kitchens and baths to fit into 260-square-foot efficiency condos which sell for $60,000. One such unit features a loft above the kitchen and a bookshelf that folds into a Murphy bed.
At the top end, she’s had the luxury of working with a 3,800-square-foot unit that sold for $500,000.
“There are definitely people who want to go very contemporary in their approach and then there are those who want a traditional, historical feeling,” she says. “Everyone wants a space that’s homey and feels like their own.”

 
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