Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Kitchen Magic/ Sara Dakoske
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Kitchen Magic/ Sara Dakoske

Robert Downes - February 23rd, 2009
Kitchen Magic/ Sara Dakoske
Robert Downes 2/23/09


Sara Dakoske looks like she’s having the time of her life at her job, and why not? Her day is spent designing imaginative, creative kitchens and baths for new residents at Building 50, the massive renovation project at the Grand Traverse Commons in Traverse City.
“I thought it would be awesome to get involved with the Building 50 development and it’s been very interesting so far,” she says. “Designing a kitchen or a bath here involves keeping the historical feel of the building, and also working with exposed conduit and duct work, the old windows and the dimensions of each space.”
For those not in the know, Building 50 is the former Northern Michigan Asylum just south of Munson Medical Center. The building has been wildly popular with condo purchasers, but offers significant challenges, considering that its small spaces and wide-open dormitory areas were once the home of mental patients. There are 14-foot ceilings throughout the residential areas, which occupy the second, third and attic floors of the building, as well as the aforementioned exposed ductwork and conduit.
But Dakoske, 27, finds the challenges of working with Building 50 to be one of the most interesting aspects of her job. So far, she’s completed roughly 30 kitchen and bath projects at Building 50, working with three other designers as part of the Shoreline Kitchen & Bath team.
A 2000 graduate of Traverse City West High School, Dakoske studied interior design at Michigan State University. Upon graduating in 2004, she landed a job in Rochester, working with a specialty lumber and building center. One of her specialties there was working with fine cabinetry.
“With the economy down in the Detroit area, I decided to move back up north,” she recalls. “I had known about Building 50 since the time I was a child, and it was great to get involved in its renovation.”
Her job involves working with numerous contractors, all of whom deal with the engineering concerns of working with a 124-year-old building with walls ranging from 12-18 inches thick.
Then there are the spaces themselves: Dakoske has created mini kitchens and baths to fit into 260-square-foot efficiency condos which sell for $60,000. One such unit features a loft above the kitchen and a bookshelf that folds into a Murphy bed.
At the top end, she’s had the luxury of working with a 3,800-square-foot unit that sold for $500,000.
“There are definitely people who want to go very contemporary in their approach and then there are those who want a traditional, historical feeling,” she says. “Everyone wants a space that’s homey and feels like their own.”

 
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