Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


Home · Articles · News · Features · Kitchen Magic/ Sara Dakoske
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Kitchen Magic/ Sara Dakoske

Robert Downes - February 23rd, 2009
Kitchen Magic/ Sara Dakoske
Robert Downes 2/23/09


Sara Dakoske looks like she’s having the time of her life at her job, and why not? Her day is spent designing imaginative, creative kitchens and baths for new residents at Building 50, the massive renovation project at the Grand Traverse Commons in Traverse City.
“I thought it would be awesome to get involved with the Building 50 development and it’s been very interesting so far,” she says. “Designing a kitchen or a bath here involves keeping the historical feel of the building, and also working with exposed conduit and duct work, the old windows and the dimensions of each space.”
For those not in the know, Building 50 is the former Northern Michigan Asylum just south of Munson Medical Center. The building has been wildly popular with condo purchasers, but offers significant challenges, considering that its small spaces and wide-open dormitory areas were once the home of mental patients. There are 14-foot ceilings throughout the residential areas, which occupy the second, third and attic floors of the building, as well as the aforementioned exposed ductwork and conduit.
But Dakoske, 27, finds the challenges of working with Building 50 to be one of the most interesting aspects of her job. So far, she’s completed roughly 30 kitchen and bath projects at Building 50, working with three other designers as part of the Shoreline Kitchen & Bath team.
A 2000 graduate of Traverse City West High School, Dakoske studied interior design at Michigan State University. Upon graduating in 2004, she landed a job in Rochester, working with a specialty lumber and building center. One of her specialties there was working with fine cabinetry.
“With the economy down in the Detroit area, I decided to move back up north,” she recalls. “I had known about Building 50 since the time I was a child, and it was great to get involved in its renovation.”
Her job involves working with numerous contractors, all of whom deal with the engineering concerns of working with a 124-year-old building with walls ranging from 12-18 inches thick.
Then there are the spaces themselves: Dakoske has created mini kitchens and baths to fit into 260-square-foot efficiency condos which sell for $60,000. One such unit features a loft above the kitchen and a bookshelf that folds into a Murphy bed.
At the top end, she’s had the luxury of working with a 3,800-square-foot unit that sold for $500,000.
“There are definitely people who want to go very contemporary in their approach and then there are those who want a traditional, historical feeling,” she says. “Everyone wants a space that’s homey and feels like their own.”

 
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