Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · The Value of...
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The Value of Vaccinations

Rebecca Peterson - March 2nd, 2009
As a mother of four young children, I am alarmed by the current pertussis alert, which is due to low vaccination rates in our area.
Vaccination programs suffer when people romanticize nature. A few “natural but deadly” threats include: lead poisoning, polio and violent weather. Yet we protect against these. In the auto state we drive a lot. Not exactly natural. So I don’t buy the “natural” argument. Making it to age 60 is not natural. It is only thanks to nutrition, clean water, vaccines, and skilled surgeons that Americans live so long. Life expectancy in Kenya? Fifty-three. Botswana? Thirty-three.
Vaccine programs also suffer due to anti-government and anti-science sentiments, common in the extreme right and the extreme left. It is “conservative“ to privatize public health - to take this decision into one’s own hands. The issue of vaccination should not be politicized, however, because science is science and diphtheria kills people.
Some people feel that strict vaccination laws (which require public school children to vaccinate with little exception) are “socialist” and “oppressive.” What I find to be socialist and oppressive is polio. Talk about an iron fist! And let’s not forget the complementary iron lung.
In an urban area, there’s no need for conversations such as: “Is polio crippling and/or fatal?” (Yes.) or, “Is polio still endemic in six countries?” (Yes.) This is because city-dwellers are seated between people from Ghana and Peru every day on their subway commute.
Arthur Allen’s article, “Bucking the Herd,” suggests that “vaccination is a victim of its own success.” There’s a reason that diseases are less common today (at least in the U.S.). One nurse in the article explains that “when they’re real little, babies don’t whoop, they just stop breathing,” in reference to a baby who died after contracting pertussis from unvaccinated siblings. Another practitioner addresses parents who choose against vaccination: “That’s not avant-garde. That’s not enlightened.”
I find that failure to vaccinate one‘s children is myopic, not hip or natural. It is also trendy and irresponsible. Our kids are global citizens. Vaccination should be a group decision, not an individual one. The do-it-yourself attitude is dangerous when it comes to contagious disease. A truly “informed” decision must include the advice of global public health experts and epidemiologists.
Many parents base immunization decisions on anecdotes, fake science, and Internet misinformation. Look no further than Dr. Andrew Wakefield, who was recently caught manipulating data in an effort to link autism to vaccines. Notice that the billions of vaccine success “anecdotes” are ignored. Sadly, this is a polarized issue, which doesn’t help anyone in the end.
Blaming vaccines is akin to blaming seatbelts, sunscreen, or chemotherapy. Are people occasionally injured by these? Yes. Do we still use them for protection?
Why is it that occasionally even a vaccinated person contracts one of these diseases? As with any medicine, vaccines are not 100 percent effective (per individual). With claims that unvaccinated and vaccinated people are at equal risk during an outbreak, try to look at percentages, not numbers. Vaccines are effective when everyone shares the responsibility, the risk, and the benefit. It’s based on the idea that everyone is participating. Vaccination is the social contract.
Unlike Michigan, New York has very strict laws on vaccination and (lo and behold!) fewer outbreaks. Loose laws equal outbreaks. Communicable diseases prey upon unvaccinated populations. Therefore, states that have loose laws (unvaccinated pockets) see outbreaks. Unfortunately, it is strict laws and deadly outbreaks that compel people to vaccinate. Michigan has one of the highest exemptor rates (a result of loose laws).
Is there some risk in vaccinating? Sure. This is exactly why the parents who take that risk (by participating) may resent those who don’t. If polio stays at bay, then it is because the majority of us are vaccinated. Vaccinated adults and children (the herd) protect those people who cannot vaccinate - including newborns and patients with compromised immune systems.
The anti-vaccine movement asks us to “think twice” about vaccines. Listen, twice is not enough. Two is a sorry number of times to think about anything, let alone history’s greatest scientific discovery.
Myth: Contagious disease will never reach Northern Michigan. Just because I may not travel a lot, does not stop other people from visiting my area. International flights take off every minute of the day. Detroit Metro, Chicago O’Hare, Ann Arbor, Lansing, NMC, local farms -- these all have international traffic. In some areas, the migrant populations have had better immunization rates than the local, resident population. Arrogant, right? Read: “We locals don’t have to vaccinate, but, hey - can you foreigners go get your shots, por favor?”
The important focus is not on the people who break the social contract, but, rather, on the two million children who die needlessly each year of vaccine-preventable disease. Either you support the global eradication of these diseases or you don’t.
Please support your local public health department, who used your tax dollars tracking pertussis recently. Thank you for vaccinating.

 
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