Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · The dropout dilemma
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The dropout dilemma

Robert Downes - March 9th, 2009
Raising Michigan’s high school dropout age to 18 sounds like a good idea in principle. But one could also argue that the new legislation may harm students who are committed to graduating by forcing them to endure the company of disruptive kids who are turned off by high school.
On March 4, the Michigan House of Representatives voted 71-31 to approve passage of House Bill 4030, which will require students to attend high school until the age of 18. The bill has gone on to the State Senate, where it faces an uncertain future.
Sponsored by State Rep. Doug Geiss (D-Taylor), the bill is the first change in Michigan’s allowable dropout age in 113 years. In 1896, the legislature ruled that students could leave school at the age of 16, primarily to help work on family farms.
Rep. Geiss makes some good points in promoting his bill. He notes that 70 percent of prisoners in Michigan are high school dropouts. He points out that requiring students to spend an extra two years in high school will better prepare them to find jobs, instead of being a drag on society.
Then too, 28 other states have raised the dropout age for students, and the bill has the support of Governor Granholm, who hopes to double the number of college students in Michigan.
We also have what amounts to a dropout crisis in our state, according to the Michigan Education Association (MEA).
Doug Pratt, communications director for the MEA, noted in an interview on Lansing radio station WILS that an estimated 20,000 Michigan students drop out of high school each year. On the average, they cost state residents $127,000 per year in lost tax revenues, public health care, unemployment, law enforcement, incarceration and other costs. “That’s $2.5 billion we could be recapturing if we could keep students in high school.”
Sounds pretty good, doesn’t it? The hope is that by raising the dropout age to 18, millions of bored, unmotivated students will be energized by two more years of school, turning their lives around to become productive members of society.
At least, that’s how it’s supposed to work, but you have to wonder if Michigan teachers are doing handsprings over the idea.
For starters, if a teenager wants to learn something, like playing the guitar or how to create a website, nothing can stop him or her. We’ve all known teens willing to spend every waking moment learning what they love.
But for kids who don’t want to learn, that’s another story.
One can only imagine the difficulty in keeping restless teenagers motivated to study subjects such as algebra, history, chemistry and English literature. Our teachers perform a heroic service every day of the week, trying to keep kids on track to graduation.
Will that gargantuan effort be made any easier by requiring unhappy, uncaring, potentially disruptive students to remain in school?
Parents of younger female students might also question the wisdom of requiring older ne’er-do-well male students to remain in school. Many studies point out the hazards of 18 and 19-year-old men hooking up with impressionable 15- and 16-year-old girls.
Do you want your honor student daughter swayed by a nihilistic young Romeo who’s going nowhere with his life, but has been stuck in high school for an extra two years? He may not have any interest in studying, but plenty of interest in leading your naive, easily-swayed child down the wrong track.
These days, you’d have to be a fool to drop out of high school, since even unskilled jobs are disappearing. Unfortunately, many teens have difficulty seeing the big picture of what their lives will be like 10, 20, 30 years on. Many teens suffer from poor judgement, low self-esteem, depression, and a general feeling of hopelessness about their future. Some are simply not inclined towards academics, but may be a whiz at working in an auto shop.
Ultimately, perhaps we’d be better off with cultural solutions to the dropout crisis, rather than a government fix. In a recent speech to Congress, President Obama made a ringing statement directed at students, noting that when you drop out of high school, you’re letting your country down as well as yourself.
Perhaps that’s the kind of talk we need to hear more of, not just in our schools, but on TV and in our homes. Kids need inspiration, perhaps in the form of more counseling in our schools. The Michigan Chamber of Commerce suggests hiring ‘dropout coaches’ for students who are at risk of dropping out; or allowing community colleges to accept students who feel the need for a challenge greater than high school can provide.
“Solutions... such as raising the dropout age are punitive. That doesn’t get to the cause of why they drop out in the first place,” the MEA’s Doug Pratt said in the interview quoted earlier.
We also need to remember that our cash-strapped state already has a cultural cure for the dropout crisis. It’s the reality check of working for minimum wage for a few years until it sinks in that it’s time to reboot your life.
That’s why we have the G.E.D. -- to give young people a second chance. In 2006, 9,839 students took the General Educational Development course in Michigan to complete their high school equivalency.
That leaves about 10,000 dropouts per year who didn‘t complete either high school or the G.E.D. That‘s a shame, but we can‘t expect government to solve every social ill, especially when scarce money for education might be better spent on those who really want to learn.

 
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