Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · The dropout dilemma
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The dropout dilemma

Robert Downes - March 9th, 2009
Raising Michigan’s high school dropout age to 18 sounds like a good idea in principle. But one could also argue that the new legislation may harm students who are committed to graduating by forcing them to endure the company of disruptive kids who are turned off by high school.
On March 4, the Michigan House of Representatives voted 71-31 to approve passage of House Bill 4030, which will require students to attend high school until the age of 18. The bill has gone on to the State Senate, where it faces an uncertain future.
Sponsored by State Rep. Doug Geiss (D-Taylor), the bill is the first change in Michigan’s allowable dropout age in 113 years. In 1896, the legislature ruled that students could leave school at the age of 16, primarily to help work on family farms.
Rep. Geiss makes some good points in promoting his bill. He notes that 70 percent of prisoners in Michigan are high school dropouts. He points out that requiring students to spend an extra two years in high school will better prepare them to find jobs, instead of being a drag on society.
Then too, 28 other states have raised the dropout age for students, and the bill has the support of Governor Granholm, who hopes to double the number of college students in Michigan.
We also have what amounts to a dropout crisis in our state, according to the Michigan Education Association (MEA).
Doug Pratt, communications director for the MEA, noted in an interview on Lansing radio station WILS that an estimated 20,000 Michigan students drop out of high school each year. On the average, they cost state residents $127,000 per year in lost tax revenues, public health care, unemployment, law enforcement, incarceration and other costs. “That’s $2.5 billion we could be recapturing if we could keep students in high school.”
Sounds pretty good, doesn’t it? The hope is that by raising the dropout age to 18, millions of bored, unmotivated students will be energized by two more years of school, turning their lives around to become productive members of society.
At least, that’s how it’s supposed to work, but you have to wonder if Michigan teachers are doing handsprings over the idea.
For starters, if a teenager wants to learn something, like playing the guitar or how to create a website, nothing can stop him or her. We’ve all known teens willing to spend every waking moment learning what they love.
But for kids who don’t want to learn, that’s another story.
One can only imagine the difficulty in keeping restless teenagers motivated to study subjects such as algebra, history, chemistry and English literature. Our teachers perform a heroic service every day of the week, trying to keep kids on track to graduation.
Will that gargantuan effort be made any easier by requiring unhappy, uncaring, potentially disruptive students to remain in school?
Parents of younger female students might also question the wisdom of requiring older ne’er-do-well male students to remain in school. Many studies point out the hazards of 18 and 19-year-old men hooking up with impressionable 15- and 16-year-old girls.
Do you want your honor student daughter swayed by a nihilistic young Romeo who’s going nowhere with his life, but has been stuck in high school for an extra two years? He may not have any interest in studying, but plenty of interest in leading your naive, easily-swayed child down the wrong track.
These days, you’d have to be a fool to drop out of high school, since even unskilled jobs are disappearing. Unfortunately, many teens have difficulty seeing the big picture of what their lives will be like 10, 20, 30 years on. Many teens suffer from poor judgement, low self-esteem, depression, and a general feeling of hopelessness about their future. Some are simply not inclined towards academics, but may be a whiz at working in an auto shop.
Ultimately, perhaps we’d be better off with cultural solutions to the dropout crisis, rather than a government fix. In a recent speech to Congress, President Obama made a ringing statement directed at students, noting that when you drop out of high school, you’re letting your country down as well as yourself.
Perhaps that’s the kind of talk we need to hear more of, not just in our schools, but on TV and in our homes. Kids need inspiration, perhaps in the form of more counseling in our schools. The Michigan Chamber of Commerce suggests hiring ‘dropout coaches’ for students who are at risk of dropping out; or allowing community colleges to accept students who feel the need for a challenge greater than high school can provide.
“Solutions... such as raising the dropout age are punitive. That doesn’t get to the cause of why they drop out in the first place,” the MEA’s Doug Pratt said in the interview quoted earlier.
We also need to remember that our cash-strapped state already has a cultural cure for the dropout crisis. It’s the reality check of working for minimum wage for a few years until it sinks in that it’s time to reboot your life.
That’s why we have the G.E.D. -- to give young people a second chance. In 2006, 9,839 students took the General Educational Development course in Michigan to complete their high school equivalency.
That leaves about 10,000 dropouts per year who didn‘t complete either high school or the G.E.D. That‘s a shame, but we can‘t expect government to solve every social ill, especially when scarce money for education might be better spent on those who really want to learn.

 
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