Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Books · Eye Candy... Playboy takes a...
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Eye Candy... Playboy takes a stroll down memory lane

Glen Young - March 30th, 2009
Eye
Candy
Playboy takes
a stroll down
memory lane

By Glen Young

Okay, so no one is going to buy Playboy’s pictorial for the reading. Nonetheless, astute readers, as well as critics of the culture, will find as many insights into evolving mores in the essays as in the stylized and recognizable photographs.
Oh yes, the photographs. In living color spread across more than 637 pages are “The Complete Centerfolds,” those iconic images from Playboy, starting with Marilyn Monroe in December 1953, concluding with Sasckya Porto, Miss December 2007, and including every lovely lady in between.
First published by Chronicle Books in late 2007, the hefty 720-page book came complete with carrying case, priced at an equally hefty $500. Just before the New Year, however, due to its better than expected popularity, Chronicle issued a more affordable version, sans case, and priced at a mere $50.
Assuredly, “Playboy: The Complete Centerfolds” is not a coffee table book for every family room. With essays from Paul Theroux, Robert Stone, Dave Hickey, Jay McInerney, Maureen Gibbon and others; however, the book is more than a sum of the photographs.
In his foreword, publisher Hugh Hefner asserts that the women in the centerfolds “became standard-bearers for a social revolution that began more than fifty years ago and continues—albeit in fits and starts—to the present day.” While its importance to journalism, and adult publishing has certainly waned over time, Hefner also asserts, “Playboy continues to reflect the dreams of American men.” His conclusion might be a bit overblown, though “The Complete Centerfolds” does colorfully document the changing shape of those dreams over the last half century.

‘FEARFUL, OPPRESSIVE TIME’
Robert Coover writes of the attitudes of the early 1950s, “for the most part, it is a fearful, oppressive, religious, patriotic, domestic, buttoned-down time.” Into this staid stew come Hefner and his notion of a new men’s magazine. In December 1953, Hefner published what would become perhaps the single most important centerfold in sultry actress Monroe. Her later notoriety only heightened the fledgling magazine’s reputation for daring. She is, Coover claims, “the decade’s perfect icon of flesh.” Through the intervening 56 years, Playboy has included the feature in every monthly issue.
In addition to Monroe, the magazine’s center pages have included others who have found more modest, B-level status, from Jenny McCarthy to Pamela Anderson, and Shannon Tweed to Shanna Moaklar.
Writing about the explosive 1960s, novelist Theroux conjures imagery from the Beatles to Vietnam, and Woodstock to The Pill to explain how the centerfolds became the “epitome of American loveliness, our very own asperas, with their creamy skins and bright smiles, the almost awkward willingness in their postures, not hookers but prom queens and biker babes.”
Theroux also explains how changing social attitudes evident outside the magazine’s pages are seen in the re-contoured geography of the centerfolds, which adopted a more informal tone, marked by less coyness and more ease.

LONGER & LEANER
Ultimately, while the women became longer, leaner, and more precisely groomed, the basic look has remained; a sultry invitation to fantasy that has long marked the magazine’s stylized pages.
This is the conclusion of novelist Gibbon, who writes of the more contemporary transformations, “In a time that favors stainless-steel appliances and granite countertops in kitchens, women have been streamlined and made to gleam, too.”
Gibbons’ conclusion, however, notes how through the many changes expressed in the poses or the grooming, the image of the centerfold is timeless, harkening back to early 20th century risqué French postcards, or E.J. Bellocq’s 1912 erotic photos of New Orleans’ women, or even Sappho.
Playboy may have lost some of its cultural collateral over the years, giving way to magazines and then internet versions of itself, many of which leave less to the imagination. “The Complete Centerfolds” however, highlights how Hefner’s vision has endured.
In 1981, J. Geils Band front man Peter Wolf asked, “Does she walk? / does she talk? /does she come complete?” in the band’s number one single “Centerfold.” Chronicle Books “Playboy: The Complete Centerfolds” doesn’t respond directly to the question, but it provides some compelling evidence for those still wondering.

 
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