Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Eye Candy... Playboy takes a...
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Eye Candy... Playboy takes a stroll down memory lane

Glen Young - March 30th, 2009
Eye
Candy
Playboy takes
a stroll down
memory lane

By Glen Young

Okay, so no one is going to buy Playboy’s pictorial for the reading. Nonetheless, astute readers, as well as critics of the culture, will find as many insights into evolving mores in the essays as in the stylized and recognizable photographs.
Oh yes, the photographs. In living color spread across more than 637 pages are “The Complete Centerfolds,” those iconic images from Playboy, starting with Marilyn Monroe in December 1953, concluding with Sasckya Porto, Miss December 2007, and including every lovely lady in between.
First published by Chronicle Books in late 2007, the hefty 720-page book came complete with carrying case, priced at an equally hefty $500. Just before the New Year, however, due to its better than expected popularity, Chronicle issued a more affordable version, sans case, and priced at a mere $50.
Assuredly, “Playboy: The Complete Centerfolds” is not a coffee table book for every family room. With essays from Paul Theroux, Robert Stone, Dave Hickey, Jay McInerney, Maureen Gibbon and others; however, the book is more than a sum of the photographs.
In his foreword, publisher Hugh Hefner asserts that the women in the centerfolds “became standard-bearers for a social revolution that began more than fifty years ago and continues—albeit in fits and starts—to the present day.” While its importance to journalism, and adult publishing has certainly waned over time, Hefner also asserts, “Playboy continues to reflect the dreams of American men.” His conclusion might be a bit overblown, though “The Complete Centerfolds” does colorfully document the changing shape of those dreams over the last half century.

‘FEARFUL, OPPRESSIVE TIME’
Robert Coover writes of the attitudes of the early 1950s, “for the most part, it is a fearful, oppressive, religious, patriotic, domestic, buttoned-down time.” Into this staid stew come Hefner and his notion of a new men’s magazine. In December 1953, Hefner published what would become perhaps the single most important centerfold in sultry actress Monroe. Her later notoriety only heightened the fledgling magazine’s reputation for daring. She is, Coover claims, “the decade’s perfect icon of flesh.” Through the intervening 56 years, Playboy has included the feature in every monthly issue.
In addition to Monroe, the magazine’s center pages have included others who have found more modest, B-level status, from Jenny McCarthy to Pamela Anderson, and Shannon Tweed to Shanna Moaklar.
Writing about the explosive 1960s, novelist Theroux conjures imagery from the Beatles to Vietnam, and Woodstock to The Pill to explain how the centerfolds became the “epitome of American loveliness, our very own asperas, with their creamy skins and bright smiles, the almost awkward willingness in their postures, not hookers but prom queens and biker babes.”
Theroux also explains how changing social attitudes evident outside the magazine’s pages are seen in the re-contoured geography of the centerfolds, which adopted a more informal tone, marked by less coyness and more ease.

LONGER & LEANER
Ultimately, while the women became longer, leaner, and more precisely groomed, the basic look has remained; a sultry invitation to fantasy that has long marked the magazine’s stylized pages.
This is the conclusion of novelist Gibbon, who writes of the more contemporary transformations, “In a time that favors stainless-steel appliances and granite countertops in kitchens, women have been streamlined and made to gleam, too.”
Gibbons’ conclusion, however, notes how through the many changes expressed in the poses or the grooming, the image of the centerfold is timeless, harkening back to early 20th century risqué French postcards, or E.J. Bellocq’s 1912 erotic photos of New Orleans’ women, or even Sappho.
Playboy may have lost some of its cultural collateral over the years, giving way to magazines and then internet versions of itself, many of which leave less to the imagination. “The Complete Centerfolds” however, highlights how Hefner’s vision has endured.
In 1981, J. Geils Band front man Peter Wolf asked, “Does she walk? / does she talk? /does she come complete?” in the band’s number one single “Centerfold.” Chronicle Books “Playboy: The Complete Centerfolds” doesn’t respond directly to the question, but it provides some compelling evidence for those still wondering.

 
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