Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · Running with a mission
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Running with a mission

Erin Cowell - April 6th, 2009
Running with a mission
My half-marathon helps find a cure for blood cancers

By Erin Crowell

A few months ago, I took a weekend girls’ trip to the Upper Peninsula. A couple hours after crossing the bridge, we were met by a fresh 33 inches of fallen snow in the Munising area. Snow piles that stood 10 feet tall, easily, acted as guarding pillars at the end of driveways. Our little red cabin sat nestled into its own snowdrift, and as the other girls unloaded their gear and cracked open a “welcome home” beer, I pulled on my running shoes and headed out for a frozen five-mile run.
Normally, I wouldn’t be so open to starting a vacation with such physical torture. Who wants to voluntarily put themselves in the middle of nowhere, running down a slippery road with snowmobiles roaring by at an uncomfortably close distances? I would -- because I joined something that sends a little voice to the back of my mind whenever I’d rather stay inside and oh, I don’t know, crack open a beer.
That something is known as Team In Training (TNT): the ones at races wearing purple, with supporters waving signs on the sidelines and showing the biggest smiles when they reach the finish line. TNT is a national program geared toward the every day person who wishes to complete an endurance race, all while raising money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS).
The Society’s mission is simple: “To find a cure for deadly blood cancers and provide support for patients and their families.” So far, TNT has raised over $800 million for LLS. My contribution to that chunk will be $4,000 and my race will be the Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon in San Diego, California. I’ve got until May 11 to raise the money and I’ve got until May 31 to get my butt in shape, which will be the day of the race with a groggy 6:30 a.m. start time.
For those unfamiliar with race distances, a half marathon is 13.1 miles -- the farthest I’ve ever run is eight miles, uncomfortably. Not that I don’t enjoy running, but to do so requires commitment and discipline. The beauty of Team In Training is in the name: You’re not the only one busting your butt. You’ve got an entire support system of teammates and coaches to help you along the way.

There are a handful of Team In Training chapters around the state of Michigan, with the closest being in Grand Rapids. Since traveling over 200 miles once or twice a week was out of the question, I became a member of the Virtual Team In Training Chapter (VTNT). The network is comprised of participants from all over the country, connected by their computers.
Let’s say we’re having the usual sun-rain-snow freak weather pattern in Northern Michigan; I’ve got five miles to run and I don’t want to deal with the crappy weather. All I have to do –and trust me, I’ve done this—is go onto the VTNT communication site and bitch.
In return, I get sympathy from my teammates and a swift kick to just get outside and deal with it because someone else is in North Dakota dealing with a white-out.
This modern-day help has revolutionized not only communication, but the way people train. Today, there are running blogs and chat forums all over the Internet, providing a community of support and training advice.
The VTNT Chapter has Joe English, a marathon runner and the managing editor for Running Advice and News. Joe has mapped out a training schedule to help us in our running goals –whether it’s to run a half marathon, a full marathon or finish with a better time. Twice a week, Joe sends out an “email blast” covering everything from hydration issues to injury prevention.
When those issues arise, Joe is just an email or phone call away.
“Distance running is about pushing our physical limits,” Joe says. “It’s about taking a journey to a place that is uncomfortable, painful and difficult and then emerging on the other side with a completely new sense of self.”
Recently, I’ve been having issues with my running pace; my stride is slower and my legs become weaker, sooner. I didn’t feel like I was prepared enough to finish the longer run on the weekends – my solution? To run more. I would simply add mileage during the week in hopes to “unshock” my body for the long run.
Joe’s answer?
“What you’re suggesting goes something like this: ‘I wasn’t able to eat a whole pizza for lunch, so tomorrow I’ll try to eat a whole pizza for breakfast in preparation for lunch; and then I’ll try to eat another whole pizza for (dinner).’”
Okay, I see the logic.
Thanks to Joe, I’m not going into my first half marathon blind with shin splints. Having a training schedule assures me I’m doing enough while telling me not to overdo it.

I’ve had the good fortune of chatting with another past Team In Training participant, living right here in Northern Michigan. Laura Jolly heard an interview on her husband’s radio show (The Ron Jolly Show on WTCM-am). The TNT participant discussed her experience and it got Laura’s attention. Shortly after, she attended an informational meeting and signed up for the Anchorage Marathon.
Training for the race, which took place in 1999, became a discovery process for Laura.
“I learned a lot about myself and setting goals. If my goal was to complete a 26.2 mile run -- before nightfall -- I had to learn to take baby steps,” Laura says. “On the days when you don’t feel like training or fundraising, remember someone with leukemia would love to be in your shoes.”
Many people today are dealing with leukemia, along with other blood cancers. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society has provided TNT participants with a slew of information, including some of the most disturbing I’ve learned:
“Leukemia causes more deaths than any other cancer among children under the age of
20; More than 894,000 Americans are battling Leukemia, Lymphoma, Hodgkin’s Disease and myeloma every day; Every four minutes, someone new is diagnosed with blood cancer; and every 10 minutes, someone dies.”
This information has driven me to a level of commitment I haven’t felt since my old high school track days. Each run feels more meaningful than the last. Like Laura says, when the training gets tough, all I have to do is think of someone who would trade my place in a heartbeat.
The race in San Diego is a particularly special race, hosting over 2,800 runners representing Team In Training -- “A sea of purple,” as TNT Southern Regional Director Julie Oplinger tells me.
Everyone there will have taken the same journey I have in the last several months. They will have felt the pain form the asphalt in their knees and the emotional drain in their heads.
I may have experienced some bumps in the road (literally) -- Some runs may hurt and the weather might suck, but you know what? There could be worse things in life. If me taking a little pain for 13 miles can help ease a lifetime of pain for someone else, well then…
…bring on the shin splints!

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