Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Charlevoix Art Fair
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Charlevoix Art Fair

Carina Hume - August 4th, 2008
Fine art treasures and a lakefront setting make Charlevoix’s Waterfront Art Fair a summer crowd-pleaser. Returning to the newly-completed downtown East Park on the shores of Charlevoix’s Round Lake, the art fair is celebrating its 50th anniversary on August 9.
Nearly 130 artists from as far away as Florida and New York offer visitors one-of-a-kind pieces. “The artists juried into the show present a range of art that is affordable to the first time art buyer and also includes pieces that are desired by the experienced art collector,” says Mary Beth McGraw, director of the art fair and president of the Charlevoix Council for the Arts.

AMBITIOUS BEGINNINGS
Charlevoix’s art fair began in 1959 with Mrs. Edward Lemcke organizing the first committee. “Determined to bring fine arts into the remote, northwestern area of Michigan’s lower peninsula, a committee, comprised of year-round and seasonal residents, held the first art fair,” explains McGraw, a 27-year member of the art fair committee and director for 13 years.
“At that time, there were no galleries in Charlevoix, and art was not part of the school curriculum. The art fair could provide encouragement for working artists in the region and young people with an interest in art.”
Two years later, Caroline Rader succeeded Lemcke and continued as leader for 22 years.
Early art fairs offered special exhibits of loaned masterworks – many borrowed from Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Cummings, eventual Sara Lee Corporation founders – by famous artists such as Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas and Henri Matisse, in order to further encourage the area’s fine arts education.
“It was a wonderful opportunity to view important, original works of art, locally, and committee member Edith Gilbert was able to make it happen,” says McGraw. “Edith was also instrumental in bringing the Detroit Institute of Arts’ Artmobile to the Charlevoix Waterfront Art Fair for three consecutive summers in the sixties.”
Special exhibits continued through 1978, but then were disbanded due to impossible logistics for transportation and insurance fees connected with the exhibits.

HIGH QUALITY ART
Originally awarding ribbons in all categories for artists desiring their work to be judged and allowing paid entry to all, the art fair’s growth eventually warranted a jury.
“We have a knowledgeable and balanced group that jury the fair each year,” says McGraw. “Based on the feedback we’ve received from artists, the public, and the reputation the art fair enjoys in the media, it appears they do a laudable job of selecting high quality art/artists.”
An estimated 600 to 1,000 entries are received each year – although no actual count is recorded – with only 150 spaces available on the East Park lawn. With several entries needing double booths, the show is limited to around 130 exhibitors each year.
“There is a great deal of variety within the primary categories that are ceramics, drawing, glass, jewelry, mixed media, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture and wood,” says McGraw.
“An enforced requirement is that the exhibition is comprised of original works by the artist, and the artist must be present. Any reproductions must be clearly marked as such and are limited to a single bin.”
Area artists Sue and Russ Bolt, Bonnie Staffel, Todd Warner, Terry Salmonson, Lori Bolt (a scholarship winner three years: 1976-1978), Luciano Duse and Barbara Godwin are all long-time exhibitors in Charlevoix’s art fair, with the late Norman Brumm – present at the second art fair in 1960 – exhibiting more years than anyone in the history of the fair.
“Painter Lars-Birger Sponberg is (now) the longest exhibiting artist – having missed only one year since 1966,” says McGraw. “He will be exhibiting in the 2008 Waterfront Fair.”

STILL FURTHERING ARTS EDUCATION
Goals of the first art fair – to further arts education – are still in place, with funds raised being used to sponsor art scholarships for Charlevoix-area students.
“The Charlevoix Waterfront Art Fair was the first (1972) in the state to commit proceeds from the show to fund scholarships for students wanting to pursue further education in the arts,” explains McGraw. “Since that time more than $30,000 has been awarded.”
The non-profit Charlevoix Council for the Arts was formed in 1990 and continues to devote art fair proceeds toward area youth.
“In addition to college scholarships, profits from the art fair provide funding for youth attending art and music camps, performances by professional dance troupes and drama companies, concerts by musical groups, purchase of original art for display in the schools and other public places, art and music workshops, visiting authors, museum visits, and grants for purchase of art, music, and drama equipment,” continues McGraw. “The monies have brought wonderful opportunities to our community, and the Council has stayed true to the founder’s original goal.”
To commemorate Charlevoix Waterfront Art Fair’s 50th anniversary, a unique publication is also being offered. “A special book will be published on the fair’s history, which will be given to the artists and available to the public for $10,” adds McGraw.

Check out Charlevoix’s Waterfront
Art Fair on Saturday, August 9 from
9 a.m. – 6 p.m., downtown. For more information visit
www.charlevoixwaterfrontartfair.org

 
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