Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Art · The Push-Pin Man
. . . .

The Push-Pin Man

Al Parker - September 1st, 2008
Traverse City artist Eric Daigh is not only passionate about his creative works, he’s also intent on earning a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records.
While other artists typically work in oils, watercolors or charcoal, Daigh has chosen to express his abilities through a very unusual medium – push pins, those run-of-the-mill, plastic colored pins that are jabbed into bulletin boards in offices around the world.
“We’ve applied to the Guinness book for ‘The Most Push Pins Applied by an Individual,’” says Daigh, an affable, energetic artisan whose lifelike character portraits are catching eyes at the
InsideOut Gallery in Traverse City.
Daigh will be featured in a one-man show, “Portraits: 50 Thousand Pieces of Plastic,” from 7 to 11 p.m. at the gallery on Sept. 19.
From a distance, Daigh’s works look like compelling, insightful portraits of a uncertain medium. But up close, a viewer is surprised to find thousands of common push pins transformed into a vibrant piece of creativity.
“Push pins are only the medium. The image is what is important to me – the gaze has to be really compelling,” explains Daigh, whose works are all oversized portraits that reflect passion, much like the works of one of his favorite artists, Chuck Close.
“He’s far and away my biggest influence,” says Daigh, who also admires the work of portrait photographer Martin Schoeller and his father, Rick Daigh.

PROCESS PAINTER
Close is noted for making huge oversized portraits, using a grid as an underlying basis for the representation of an image through digital or photo-mechanical means. It’s a simple, but versatile process that offers more creativity than one might expect.
Like Close, Daigh considers himself a “process painter” whose works combine creativity with hours of diligent application.
“It’s the humanity that we’re trying to show,” says Daigh. “It’s really tricky sometimes, trying to get the exact curve of a cheek or wrinkle under an eye.”
Daigh begins his projects by taking a series of photos of the subject. After carefully analyzing the photos, he uses a computer and specialized software to break an image down to a very low resolution and force the computer to make the image out of only five colors, the primary colors of red, blue and yellow, plus black and white.
“With the push pins, I don’t have every color in the rainbow to use. It’s a limited color palette,” he explains. “Push pins only come in a few colors.”
Daigh gets his multi-colored packs of 500 pins through local retailers. He and his wife, Meghan, sometimes spend their evenings sorting pins into the five colors he uses. Push pins don’t come in black, so Daigh has to spray paint green pins to black.
After breaking the image down to a low resolution, Daigh produces a row-by-row grid that dictates where each color pin should be placed to form the image. Daigh then places the pins, one-by-one, following the grid map. It takes some 11,000 push pins to complete one of his 3x4-foot works.
“If I can do 1,000 pins a day, I’m pretty happy,” says Daigh. “But one advantage to working with pins is that I can work on it for two minutes and place a few pins or I can work for two hours at a time.”

CIRCLE OF BLUE
Born and raised in Southern California, Daigh was 15 when his family moved to Traverse City. He graduated from TC Central High School and later the University of Montana.
After college he moved back to Traverse City in 2004. When not working on his art projects, Daigh works for Circle of Blue, an international organization that focuses on the global freshwater crisis.
While most of his recent works utilize the colored pins, Daigh is already planning on expanding his medium into thread and colored duct tape. He tried working with colored star stickers, but they were too reflective.
No matter the medium, Daigh is very pleased that the public has expressed interest in his works.
“It’s impressive to me to think that someone has paid their hard-earned money to have one of my works in their home,” he says. “It’s quite an honor.”
For more information, go to www.daigh.com/pins or www.insideoutgallery.com.
 
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