Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Coping with Lymphedema
. . . .

Coping with Lymphedema

Valerie Kirn-Duensing - November 3rd, 2008
Good news. Bad news. That seems to be the way things work. The good news is that breast cancer detection and survival rates are improving. The bad news is that once you survive the rigors of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, a condition called Secondary Lymphedema is likely to park itself front and center in your life as a result of the surgery and follow-up treatment. Again, the good news is lymphedema is finally receiving more attention and therefore more research dollars. The bad news is once you develop it, there is no cure. It becomes a life-long concern.
Lymphedema occurs when the lymphatic system becomes disrupted or malfunctions in some way and the lymphatic fluid stops flowing, resulting in unsightly swelling, pain and even life-threatening infection.
There are two types of lymphedema: Primary lymphedema, which is rare, is caused by the absence of certain lymph vessels at birth or genetic abnormalities in the lymphatic vessels. Secondary lymphedema, or acquired lymphedema, develops as a result of surgery, radiation or trauma where the lymph nodes are removed or damaged.
Cancer surgeries are the main culprits of secondary lymphedema because they typically also involve the
removal of lymph nodes. The most common surgeries are breast, melanoma, gynecological, prostate, bladder and colon surgery. The insidious thing is that secondary lymphedema can develop at any time–days, weeks, months or even years later. One woman was diagnosed nine years after her mastectomy when her arm swelled up during an airplane flight (a fairly common trigger for the onset of lymphedema).
How many people suffer from lymphedema? It is difficult to say because many of the cases are never diagnosed accurately and some are often not reported at all. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimate that 100 million men, women and children around the world suffer from this condition. In the United States alone, at least three million Americans are affected. Another statistic released in 2006 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, states there are presently about 10 million cancer survivors in the U.S. It is estimated that between 20-40 percent of these survivors will develop lymphedema at some time in their lives. What that means is that there are currently three million cases of lymphedema in our country caused by cancer treatment alone.

A NEW THERAPY
In 1979, Sherry Lebed Davis’ mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and, after surgery, fell into a state of depression and inactivity. Lebed Davis and her two brothers, both physicians, decided to intervene. Based on Lebed Davis’ experience as a professional dancer and teacher for 15 years, and her brothers’ medical expertise, they developed “The Lebed Method” which focused on regaining and maintaining range of motion, balance and “frozen shoulder” syndrome.
In 1996 Lebed Davis herself was diagnosed with breast cancer and in 1999 developed secondary lymphedema. As a result, several new exercises were added to the Lebed program to specifically address the lymphatic system to help reduce swelling and encourage drainage. Thus, “The Lebed Method: Focus on Healing Through Movement and Dance” was born.
Currently, the Lebed exercise program is offered at more than 450 hospitals, cancer centers, fitness centers and community centers around the world. And not just breast cancer survivors and lymphedema sufferers are finding it helpful. Those diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and arthritis are also claiming benefits.
In Traverse City, occupational therapist and newly-certified Lebed instructor Sharon Studinger will inaugurate the area’s first Lebed Method movement and dance program at Munson Community Health Center, 550 Munson Avenue. Classes will run every Wednesday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., October 29 through December 3, 2008. The first six-week session is free to all participants. After that, the eight-week class will cost $120.
“The movements are slow and smooth and set to up-beat music from the sixties through the nineties,” Studinger said. “The class is completely designed for those with little or no dance experience. Everyone will find their pace.”
Benefits of the Lebed program have been most recently documented by the Cancer Nursing journal, in which the program was shown to have a significant positive effect on the psychological well-being and quality of life of the participants, as well as increased range of shoulder motion.
“Besides the positive effects of exercise, participants find camaraderie and a support group of others who have the same challenges,” Studinger said. “Class members are encouraged to stay after class and talk.”
If interested in The Lebed Method Focus on Healing Through Movement and Dance class, call Studinger at
231-668-7430.
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close