Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Coping with Lymphedema
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Coping with Lymphedema

Valerie Kirn-Duensing - November 3rd, 2008
Good news. Bad news. That seems to be the way things work. The good news is that breast cancer detection and survival rates are improving. The bad news is that once you survive the rigors of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, a condition called Secondary Lymphedema is likely to park itself front and center in your life as a result of the surgery and follow-up treatment. Again, the good news is lymphedema is finally receiving more attention and therefore more research dollars. The bad news is once you develop it, there is no cure. It becomes a life-long concern.
Lymphedema occurs when the lymphatic system becomes disrupted or malfunctions in some way and the lymphatic fluid stops flowing, resulting in unsightly swelling, pain and even life-threatening infection.
There are two types of lymphedema: Primary lymphedema, which is rare, is caused by the absence of certain lymph vessels at birth or genetic abnormalities in the lymphatic vessels. Secondary lymphedema, or acquired lymphedema, develops as a result of surgery, radiation or trauma where the lymph nodes are removed or damaged.
Cancer surgeries are the main culprits of secondary lymphedema because they typically also involve the
removal of lymph nodes. The most common surgeries are breast, melanoma, gynecological, prostate, bladder and colon surgery. The insidious thing is that secondary lymphedema can develop at any time–days, weeks, months or even years later. One woman was diagnosed nine years after her mastectomy when her arm swelled up during an airplane flight (a fairly common trigger for the onset of lymphedema).
How many people suffer from lymphedema? It is difficult to say because many of the cases are never diagnosed accurately and some are often not reported at all. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimate that 100 million men, women and children around the world suffer from this condition. In the United States alone, at least three million Americans are affected. Another statistic released in 2006 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, states there are presently about 10 million cancer survivors in the U.S. It is estimated that between 20-40 percent of these survivors will develop lymphedema at some time in their lives. What that means is that there are currently three million cases of lymphedema in our country caused by cancer treatment alone.

A NEW THERAPY
In 1979, Sherry Lebed Davis’ mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and, after surgery, fell into a state of depression and inactivity. Lebed Davis and her two brothers, both physicians, decided to intervene. Based on Lebed Davis’ experience as a professional dancer and teacher for 15 years, and her brothers’ medical expertise, they developed “The Lebed Method” which focused on regaining and maintaining range of motion, balance and “frozen shoulder” syndrome.
In 1996 Lebed Davis herself was diagnosed with breast cancer and in 1999 developed secondary lymphedema. As a result, several new exercises were added to the Lebed program to specifically address the lymphatic system to help reduce swelling and encourage drainage. Thus, “The Lebed Method: Focus on Healing Through Movement and Dance” was born.
Currently, the Lebed exercise program is offered at more than 450 hospitals, cancer centers, fitness centers and community centers around the world. And not just breast cancer survivors and lymphedema sufferers are finding it helpful. Those diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and arthritis are also claiming benefits.
In Traverse City, occupational therapist and newly-certified Lebed instructor Sharon Studinger will inaugurate the area’s first Lebed Method movement and dance program at Munson Community Health Center, 550 Munson Avenue. Classes will run every Wednesday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., October 29 through December 3, 2008. The first six-week session is free to all participants. After that, the eight-week class will cost $120.
“The movements are slow and smooth and set to up-beat music from the sixties through the nineties,” Studinger said. “The class is completely designed for those with little or no dance experience. Everyone will find their pace.”
Benefits of the Lebed program have been most recently documented by the Cancer Nursing journal, in which the program was shown to have a significant positive effect on the psychological well-being and quality of life of the participants, as well as increased range of shoulder motion.
“Besides the positive effects of exercise, participants find camaraderie and a support group of others who have the same challenges,” Studinger said. “Class members are encouraged to stay after class and talk.”
If interested in The Lebed Method Focus on Healing Through Movement and Dance class, call Studinger at
231-668-7430.
 
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